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  1.  3
    On the Value of Life.Ognjen Arandjelović - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):227-241.
    That life has value is a tenet eliciting all but universal agreement, be it amongst philosophers, policy-makers, or the general public. Yet, when it comes to its employment in practice, especially in the context of policies which require the balancing of different moral choices—for example in health care, foreign aid, or animal rights related decisions—it takes little for cracks to appear and for disagreement to arise as to what the value of life actually means and how it should guide our (...)
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  2.  1
    Psychotherapy Using Religious Texts.Vikas Beniwal - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):135-157.
    The paper presents a method for interpreting religious texts for use in psychotherapy. In particular, the paper takes the example of the pivotal character Arjuna in Bhagavad-Gita as having low frustration tolerance and uses the collective philosophy of the Bhagavad-Gita and Bhagavata-Purana through six steps of Logic-Based Therapy to overcome it. Although the paper uses Hindu religious texts, the treatment of these texts will speak to anyone interested in the possibility of integrating religious texts into psychotherapy.
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  3.  7
    What is an Emotion?Elliot D. Cohen - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):171-181.
    This paper distinguishes between two types of emotion: “bottom-up” largely “prewired” or conditioned responses to environmental stimuli and “top-down” “evaluative” emotions that are a function of a person’s evaluative inferences and use of “emotive” language. The paper, in turn, develops an analysis of the latter type of emotion and formulates a definition that tracks three interrelated levels of activity transpiring during an emotional episode: logico-linguistic, phenomenological, and neurological. In the light of this analysis, it shows how Logic-Based Therapy, a prominent (...)
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  4.  3
    The Dawn of the Future-Like-Ours Argument Against Abortion.Gianluca Di Muzio - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):209-226.
    Although several scholars have held that the Greeks and the Romans viewed abortion as morally unproblematic, an examination of three ancient texts reveals that, starting around the first century CE, some Greek and Roman writers were willing to explore reasons for opposing abortion on ethical grounds. The three texts introduce a form of opposition to abortion that has come to be known in our time as the future-like-ours argument against abortion. The present paper explores the argument that emerges from the (...)
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  5.  1
    Philosophy as a Way of Life for Addiction Recovery.Guy du Plessis - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):159-170.
    In this essay I explore the notion of philosophy as a way of life as a recovery pathway for individuals in addiction recovery. My hypothesis is that philosophy as a way of life can be a compelling, and legitimate recovery pathway for individuals in addiction recovery, as one of many recovery pathways. I will focus on logic-based therapy applied in the context of addiction recovery. The aim of presenting a case study is to show how a client receiving LBT is (...)
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  6.  1
    Applied Political Philosophy: Indira Gandhi and the Subcontinent.Jane Duran - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):243-251.
    More than one line of argument is adduced to buttress and support the contention that the writings of Indira Gandhi constitute a valuable political philosophy for today. Her Peoples and Problems is alluded to, and the advertence of her thought to Vedanta made clear.
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  7.  3
    Addressing Albert’s Anger Through Logic-Based Therapy.Michael A. Istvan - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):183-208.
    Here I recount my practicum sessions with Albert, a client who struggles with anger outbursts. Since it can be hard to draw a line between a DSM and a non-DSM issue, my first inclination as a practitioner of Logic-Based Therapy (LBT)—and in line with practice boundaries and referral standards affirmed by the National Philosophical Counseling Association (NPCA)—was to refer Albert to a licensed therapist. But since Albert was already seeing a therapist, and since Albert never loses cognizance of what he (...)
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  8.  8
    Bioethics and Non-Consequentialism.Stephen Kershnar - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):289-307.
    The various features of bioethics center around a person’s right to decide what happens to her body and what she may do with it. This is true for patients and medical professionals. Our intuitions concerning rights in bioethics are similar to our intuitions concerning rights in other areas. Consider, for example, rights concerning movement, privacy, religion, sex, speech, and thought. Intuitively, these rights are consistent with one another, trump other moral considerations, and can be lost. If people were to own (...)
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  9.  4
    Hume’s “Third Way”: A Pareto Optimal Account of Convention.Uros Prokic - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):253-272.
    This inquiry critically assesses previous research utilizing a game theory framework to understand Hume’s account of convention as the tangible expression of justice for the purpose of regulating possessions. In so doing, this research offers an alternative understanding of Humean convention that first clearly lays out the rules and main assumptions of the game, as presented in A Treatise of Human Nature, and then proceeds to analyze the implied optimal strategy and outcome. Rejecting commonly held views considering Humean convention in (...)
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  10.  1
    Professional Responsibility as a Response to Systematic Moral Ambiguity.James Rocha - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):273-287.
    There is something mysterious about what explains the foundations or grounding for professional responsibility. What grounds the distinct professional responsibility that an engineer, doctor, or lawyer has that is separate from their moral duties and legal requirements? I argue that professional responsibility can derive from a systematic response to ambiguities that occur within moral issues that arise for given professions. Moral problems can often be solved in different ways that are equally permissible, which I will say provides a “moral ambiguity.” (...)
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  11. Moral Grounds for Forgiveness.Derek R. Brookes - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):97-108.
    In this paper, I argue that forgiveness is a morally appropriate response only when it is grounded in the wrongdoer’s demonstration of genuine remorse, their offer of a sincere apology, and, where appropriate, acts of recompense and behavioral change. I then respond to John Kleinig’s suggestion (in his paper “Forgiveness and Unconditionality”) that when an apology is not forthcoming, there are at least three additional grounds that, when motivated by virtues such as love and compassion, could nevertheless render “unconditional forgiveness” (...)
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  12.  57
    Forgiveness as Conditional: A Reply to Kleinig.Derek R. Brookes - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):117-125.
    In my paper “Moral Grounds for Forgiveness,” I argued that forgiveness is morally appropriate only when a sincere apology is received, thus ruling out the three grounds for unconditional forgiveness suggested by John Kleinig in his paper “Forgiveness and Unconditionality.” In response to his reply “Defending Unconditional Forgiveness,” I argue here that my terminology, once clarified, does not undermine my construal of resentment; that conditional forgiveness is just as discretionary as unconditional forgiveness; and that what we choose to take into (...)
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  13.  2
    When Should the Military Get Involved in Politics?Jovana Davidovic - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):1-12.
    Commonly the military stays out of politics, and for good reason. Federal law regulates political activity for active duty military rather strictly because the consequences of having a military that is partisan can be devastating, as history has shown us repeatedly. In this paper, I argue that the current rules of political neutrality are too broad and that there are times when our military leaders ought to engage in political debate so as to serve the same aims that justify having (...)
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  14. The Palestinian Right of Return.Raja Halwani - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):65-82.
    The paper argues that individual Palestinians have a right of return to historic Palestine in virtue of being members of the Palestinian people that continues to have occupancy rights in historic Palestine. More specifically, the paper argues that the Palestinians were, when Israel was founded, a people with occupancy rights to their lands, that they continue to be a people to this day, and that their occupancy right has not been alienated, forfeited, or prescripted. The paper then argues that individual (...)
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  15.  6
    The Palestinian Right of Return.Raja Halwani - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):65-82.
    The paper argues that individual Palestinians have a right of return to historic Palestine in virtue of being members of the Palestinian people that continues to have occupancy rights in historic Palestine. More specifically, the paper argues that the Palestinians were, when Israel was founded, a people with occupancy rights to their lands, that they continue to be a people to this day, and that their occupancy right has not been alienated, forfeited, or prescripted. The paper then argues that individual (...)
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  16.  12
    The Sabermetrics of State Medical School Admissions.Stephen Kershnar - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):45-63.
    In this paper, I argue that medical school admissions should be limited to statistically relevant factors. My argument rests primarily on three assumptions. A state professional school should maximize production. If a state professional school should maximize production, then it should maximize production per student. If a state professional school should maximize production per student, then, within the optimum budget, a state medical school should maximize quality-adjusted medical services per graduate. I put forth a tentative equation for ranking applicants as (...)
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  17.  6
    Forgiveness and Unconditionality.John Kleinig - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):83-96.
    If forgiveness is to be seen as a virtuous act, it must satisfy certain conditions. For many, those conditions are construed narrowly and must involve some change of heart on the part of the wrongdoer who is to be forgiven: remorse, apology, a willingness to provide recompense, and so forth. Such an account is usually characterized as one of conditional forgiveness. Others construe the conditions differently—not eschewing remorse and apology, but neither always requiring it—and see those conditions as those relevant (...)
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  18.  2
    Cognitive-Behavior Interventions for Self-Defeating Thoughts: Helping Clients to Overcome the Tyranny of "I Can’T". [REVIEW]Mike W. Martin - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):127-132.
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  19.  8
    Pain, Suffering, and Euthanasia in Insects.Matan Shelomi - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):31-43.
    While unnecessarily killing or injuring an insect is arguably wrong, euthanasia of an accidentally injured insect raises anew issues of whether insects can experience pain. The question takes renewed significance due to increasing insect farming for food and feed and concerns over farmed insect welfare. For euthanasia of a damaged insect to be justifiable, the damage must be sensed as a noxious stimulus that the insect consciously experiences as pain. This pain must then lead to suffering or frustrated desire, with (...)
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  20.  9
    The Myth of Semiotic Arguments in Democratic Theory and How This Exposes Problems with Peer Review.James Stacey Taylor - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):13-29.
    In a recent series or books and articles Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski have developed criticisms of what they term “semiotic” arguments. They hold that these arguments are widely used both to criticize markets in certain goods, to defend democracy, and criticize epistocracy. Their work on semiotics is now widely cited. In this paper I argue that there is no reason to believe that any defenders of democracy or critics of epistocracy have offered semiotic arguments for their positions. I (...)
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