Year:

  1. Conscience Exemptions in Medicine: A Hegelian Feminist Perspective.Victoria I. Burke - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):267-287.
    In this article, I defend the view that conscience exemption clauses for medical practitioners (doctors, nurses, technicians, pharmacists) should be limited by patient protection clauses. This view was also defended by Mark Wicclair, in his book on conscience exemptions in medicine (Cambridge UP, 2011). In this article, I defend Wicclair’s view by supplementing it with Hegelian ethical theory and feminist critical theory. Conscience exemptions are important to support as a matter of human rights. They support an individual’s right to protect (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. A Dilemma for Moral Deliberation in AI.Ryan Jenkins & Duncan Purves - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):313-335.
    Many social trends are conspiring to drive the adoption of greater automation in society, and we will certainly see a greater offloading of human decisionmaking to robots in the future. Many of these decisions are morally salient, including decisions about how benefits and burdens are distributed. Roboticists and ethicists have begun to think carefully about the moral decision making apparatus for machines. Their concerns often center around the plausible claim that robots will lack many of the mental capacities that are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Love.Natasha McKeever - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):201-218.
    It is usually taken for granted that romantic relationships will be sexual, but it seems that there is no necessary reason for this, as it is possible for romantic relationships to not include sex. Indeed, sometimes sex is a part of a romantic relationship for only a relatively short period of it. Furthermore, scientific explanations of the link between sex and love don’t seem fully satisfying because they tell us only about the mechanics of sex, rather than its meaning or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Adultery, Open Marriage, and Autonomy.Mark Piper - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):219-229.
    It is often claimed that adultery can be morally permissible in cases where those engaged in adulterous behavior are part of an open marriage. Yet this only follows if the institution of open marriage itself can be justified. This problem has been generally overlooked, but it deserves attention, as it is far from evident that open marriage has sterling moral credentials. I argue that the most promising general justification of the institution of open marriage is not based on consequentialist or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Killing, Letting Die, and the Death Penalty.Brian K. Powell - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):337-346.
    One popular sort of argument for the death penalty depends on the idea of possibly saving innocent lives through added deterrent value. Defenders of such arguments generally concede that: a) we do not know whether or not the death penalty actually adds marginal deterrent value beyond life in prison, and b) any actual death penalty regime is likely to include the execution of some innocent people. Use of the death penalty might save some innocent people, but it is also likely (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. The Temporal Structure of Habits and the Possibility of Transformation.Shannon B. Proctor - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):251-266.
    Habits and habitudes are peculiar in that they are both a condition of human agency, as well as one of its most significant hurdles. They open up the world by providing us with ways of being within it. However, they also confine our worldly behavior given their repetitive and often predictable nature. This tension between spontaneity and repetition arises out of the two-fold temporal structure of habits—i.e., the habitual body simultaneously directs us toward the future and the past. An understanding (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  2
    Real-Time Democracy.Shane Ryan - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):301-312.
    Standard representative democracy is criticised on democratic grounds and the case is made for an alternative system of democratic governance. The paper discusses ways in which representative democracy falls short of the democratic ideal of self-governance. Referendum and initiative are examined as mechanisms that further self-governance, but are argued not to go far enough. Direct democracy is considered as an alternative to representative democracy, but the case is made that even on democratic grounds direct democracy is unnecessarily demanding. It is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Reintegration of Myth in the Socratic Method.A. Stephan Rick, M. Alhassoon Omar & Torre-Bueno Ava - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):231-249.
    Recent studies indicate that adapting common components of universal healing practices increases the effectiveness of multicultural therapies, especially incorporating initial and reformulated myths. The Socratic method, part of an original philosophical process directed toward therapeutic goals, has long been instrumental to many psychotherapies, but limited in application to dialectical discourse. Through a rediscovery and clarification of the original integrated Socratic-Platonic method inclusive of mythmaking as well as systematic questioning, the authors argue that this new, more comprehensive model provides a foundation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Obligations of Justice and the Interests of the Dead.Janna Thompson - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):289-300.
    Intergenerational justice gives present citizens obligations to past as well as future generations. Present members of a political society have an obligation to respect the contributions of their predecessors. But respect for past generations also means taking their intergenerational objectives into account in political decision-making—giving them weight in determining intergenerational policies—and thus treating past generations as participants in intergenerational policymaking. Neither the inability of the dead to have experiences, nor epistemological difficulties in determining their interests, nor the entitlement of present (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. A Hookup of Her Own.Allison B. Wolf - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):191-200.
    The last fifteen years have seen an increasing social science scholarship into the nature and pervasiveness of hooking up amongst college students,1 but research on the philosophical and ethical issues within hookup culture and practice has not kept pace. To the extent that hooking up has been taken up by philosophers, it has been as part of a larger conversation about the ethics of casual sex, broadly construed; a conversation which is dominated by questions of objectification. As such, investigations into (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  2
    Obesity, Metabolically Healthy or Otherwise—A Word of Caution.Douglas Edward Barre - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):175-185.
    Stewart and Korol contend that obesity is benign. In support of their position they have focussed on selected papers that do not take into consideration key realities. Their attempt to minimise the impact of obesity appears to centre on how difficult it can be to lose weight by diet alone and problems with measurements of obesity, while failing to acknowledge the specific and well-documented impact of deleterious biochemical alterations arising from central obesity. Stewart and Korol also do not point out (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  5
    Life Extension and Future Generations.Adrian Bunn - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):133-147.
    Future technology may dramatically extend the human lifespan. Peter Singer argues that we should reject life extension because developing it would result in a world with lower total and average happiness. Singer’s argument depends on the claim that we should maximise average happiness per moment. I will argue that developing the life-extending drug would not be impermissible because doing so will maximise average happiness per person. I offer an independent argument for why we should adopt a consequentialist principle which says (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  6
    The Price of a Person.Michael Davis - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):105-114.
    While we’re inclined to think that a person is “above all price,” we in fact make a lot of decisions that seem to set a price on persons—or, at least, on their life. For example, I was recently involved with setting standards for buildings in areas susceptible to earthquakes. The consensus seemed to be $3/sq. ft. increase in construction cost was reasonable, more than that was not, even though lives could be saved if the standard were higher, assuring the survival (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  8
    Everyday Sexism.John Draeger - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):163-174.
    Men often allow their eyes to linger over the least bit of exposed cleavage or uncovered knee. This paper considers the harm done by such looks. Taken individually, male looks may not seem that bad. They need not cause direct harm and need not be done with malicious intent. Like environmental degradation, however, the accumulation of individually imperceptible harms pollutes the moral environment, especially given a long history of gender discrimination. Given the complexity of the gendered environment, I appeal to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  2
    Democratic Liberty and Poverty Eradication.Daryl Glaser - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):15-26.
    This article engages with H. P. P. Lötter’s account of democracy, liberty, and poverty in this IJAP symposium devoted to his book, Poverty, Ethics, and Justice. For Lötter liberty and democracy are intrinsically part of what is meant by poverty eradication and necessary instrumentally to secure whatever else it means. Lötter insists that liberty rights and socio-economic rights are interdependent and that neither has moral priority. This account is pitched at a level of generality, and contains ambiguities, that evade certain (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  3
    Justice in the Public Square.Raymond Hain - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):149-162.
    This paper develops some foundations for an Aristotelian ethics of the built environment by combining the formal elements of Aristotelian justice with the design theory of Christopher Alexander. The resulting ordered set of human actions and their corresponding built environments require social deliberation about the integration of activities. This deliberation is required at all levels of human action, is characterized by local and step-wise decision making, and in important ways makes it possible for us to know if and how we (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  7
    The Ethics of Current Drone Policy.Steven P. Lee - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):115-132.
    The subject of this paper is the ethics of the use of attack drones by a state. My concern is not the moral acceptability of drones as such, but rather that of current drone policy insofar as it involves the targeted killing of individuals in the “war on terror.” I seek to clarify and extend some of the arguments offered regarding the policy. Though this will involve some appeal to just war theory, my moral argument is broader than this. I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  11
    Is Poverty Eradication Impossible? No, Says Dignitarianism.H. P. P. Lötter - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):43-64.
    In this article, I reply to three discussions of Poverty, Ethics and Justice that are published in this symposium of the Journal. In my book I argued for a moral obligation on the part of the state and an array of other agents to eradicate poverty, but critics maintain that doing so would be impossible, either because it would logically contradict the liberal ends of the state, or because it would undermine a robust commitment to democratic choice, or because it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  19
    Poverty as Inhuman: Plausible but Illiberal?Thaddeus Metz - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):1-14.
    In this article, part of a special issue devoted to Hennie Lötter’s Poverty, Ethics and Justice, I draw out an interesting implication of Hennie Lötter’s original and compelling conception of the nature of poverty as essentially inhuman. After motivating this view, I argue that it, like the capabilities approach and other views that invoke a conception of good and bad lives, is inconsistent with a standard understanding of a liberal account of the state’s role, one that is independently supported and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  61
    Duties to the Global Poor and Minimalism About Global Justice.Alex Rajczi - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):65-89.
    This paper is about the implications of a common view on global justice. The view can be called the Minimalist View, and it says that we have no positive duties to help the poor in foreign countries, or that if we do, they are very minimal. It might seem as if, by definition, the Minimalist View cannot require that we do very much about global poverty. However, in his book World Poverty and Human Rights, Thomas Pogge pointed out that this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  2
    Oaxacan Transborder Communities and the Political Philosophy of Immigration.Amy Reed-Sandoval - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):91-104.
    In this paper I argue that members of Oaxacan Indigenous “transborder communities” of Mexico and the United States are entitled to a freedom of movement right between these two countries. First, I explore the vital role that migration across the U.S.-Mexico border plays in maintaining Oaxacan transborder societal culture. Second, I explore the implications of Will Kymlicka’s views on collective rights for this phenomenon. On the one hand, Kymlicka’s argument that just states must protect the societal cultures of minority groups (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  3
    Eradicating Poverty, Resource Allocation, and the Environment.Tristen Taylor - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):27-42.
    Hennie Lötter, in his book Poverty, Ethics, and Justice, contends that we have a moral obligation to eradicate global poverty, but does so under the assumption that eradicating poverty is possible under current political and economic policy. Roughly 1.8 billion people currently consume the majority of the world’s economic production. About 5.2 billion poor people would like to consume at similar levels. Is it possible for the non-consuming class to approach levels of material welfare similar to that of the consuming (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues