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  1.  2
    Communicating Progress on Meeting the United Nations Global Compact Goals – an Analysis of the South African Experience.Daniel Malan - 2017 - African Journal of Business Ethics 11 (2).
    The purpose of business has been a consistent focus area in the field of corporate responsibility. This article examines public disclosures on CR made by South African signatories to the United Nations Global Compact, with reference to recent contributions on the purpose of business. Over time, the focus of CR has shifted from an internal corporate to a broader systemic perspective, reflecting the view that the responsibility of corporations cannot be addressed in isolation. In terms of purpose, Porter and Kramer (...)
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  2.  1
    Economic Growth and Progress: A Paradigmatic Conflation.John Myburgh Morrison - 2017 - African Journal of Business Ethics 11 (2).
    This paper uses a paradigmatic lens to conceptually explore the global sustainability crisis. To anchor what would otherwise be an abstract thought experiment, the discussion focuses on GDP, economic growth and progress measurement. By reviewing the extensive debate around GDP through a paradigmatic lens, the paper explores why the prevailing growth-centric paradigm is “in crisis”. More importantly, it suggests that the crisis is unlikely be resolved by human agency, unless the requisite convincing forces for a paradigm shift are present. Or, (...)
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  3.  1
    Can We Overcome the Anthropocentrism Bias in Sustainability Discourse?Piet Naudé - 2017 - African Journal of Business Ethics 11 (2).
    Based on a turn to the rational human subject in Descartes, Kant and Feuerbach, this paper critically examines four efforts at shaping sustainability discourse: the definition of sustainability in Our common future; stewardship Christian theology; forms of partisan justice; and GDP as measure of economic growth. These efforts made certain advances, but because they share the underlying anthropocentric bias of Western philosophy, they fail to step out of the current sustainability paradigm. The paper closes with two suggestions of how to (...)
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  4.  1
    Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting of Banks Operating in Ghana.Kwamena Minta Nyarku - 2017 - African Journal of Business Ethics 11 (2).
    This study seeks to track corporate social responsibility reporting of local and foreign banks in Ghana from 2010-2014 financial year ends. Employing a qualitative approach, data used were only annual reports sourced from selected banks’ websites. We found that all selected banks reported more external than internal disclosures. Concerning internal disclosures, only one foreign bank reported product and customer initiatives whiles one local and four foreign banks reported human resource initiatives. External disclosures reported uneven community involvement and environmental focus among (...)
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  5.  3
    A Framework for Managing and Assessing Ethics in Namibia: An Internal Audit Perspective.Nolan Angermund & Kato Plant - 2017 - African Journal of Business Ethics 11 (1).
    The Namibian Governance Code was implemented in 2014 and calls for organisations to manage ethics effectively. This study proposes an ethics framework that can be used by management to build an ethical culture and used by internal auditors to assess the effectiveness of an organisation’s ethical culture. Data was collected from managers and senior internal auditors in the financial services industry, based on their views of the proposed ethics framework. Management agreed that such a framework could contribute to building an (...)
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  6.  4
    Responsible Business Practices: Aspects Influencing Decision-Making in Small, Medium and Micro-Sized Enterprises.Lynette Cronje, Edmund John Ferreira & Sumei van Antwerpen - 2017 - African Journal of Business Ethics 11 (1).
    Society demands responsible actions from both large and small medium and micro-sized enterprises. This study sought to identify the aspects that influence decision-makers of SMMEs to utilise business resources for responsible business practices and the different demographic variables that impact on these influencing aspects. After multi-stage sampling, results from a self-administered questionnaire distributed to 84 SMMEs in the Tshwane region indicated that personal feelings and emotions, ethics, morals, financial condition, requests from friends and family, religion and competitive reasons influence SMME (...)
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  7.  3
    Business Practices Influencing Ethical Conduct of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Uganda.Jamiah Mayanja & Sandra Perks - 2017 - African Journal of Business Ethics 11 (1).
    Although small- and medium businesses significant economic contributions are globally acknowledged, many SMEs in Uganda have not fully adopted and integrated ethics into their business strategies. This study explores the business practices that influence SME’s ethical conduct in Uganda. Primary data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. A sample of 384 SME owner/managers was surveyed employing convenience sampling. The data was analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The empirical findings show that the business practices of SMEs significantly influence their ethical (...)
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  8.  2
    Inculcating Ethics in Small and Mediumsized Business Enterprises: A South African Leadership Perspective.Bryan Michael Robinson & Jacobus Albertus Jonker - 2017 - African Journal of Business Ethics 11 (1).
    This research provides a much needed and deeper insight into the management of ethics by leaders of medium-sized business enterprises in the South African context. Utilising a mixed methodological approach of qualitative and quantitative analyses, the research describes the unique ethical risks faced by leaders of medium-sized businesses, and how these leaders attempt to mitigate such risks through embedding their personal values within the organisation, and the systems and operational mechanisms adopted to assist them in this regard.
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  9.  4
    An Evaluation of the Reporting on Ethics and Integrity of Selected Listed Motor Vehicle Companies.Anet Magdalena Smit & Elizabeth J. Bierman - 2017 - African Journal of Business Ethics 11 (1).
    Transparency in reporting has become very important and various stakeholders expect companies to disclose sensitive information, such as ethical aspects, integrity and anti-corruption information. Any indication of corruption can be detrimental when trying to attract foreign investors to invest in a country. These disclosure practices could place remarkable pressure on a company that needs to portray a positive image to their stakeholders. The main objective of this research was to evaluate the reporting on ethics, integrity and anti-corruption of companies in (...)
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  10.  1
    Faculty Reluctance to Report Student Plagiarism: A Case Study.Adèle Thomas - 2017 - African Journal of Business Ethics 11 (1).
    Internationally, student plagiarism is on the rise despite measures introduced by universities to detect its occurrence and to institute actions to prevent and address this practice. One of the reasons that contributes to this problem is the reluctance of faculty to report student plagiarism. Through the medium of a disguised South African case study, this paper advances reasons to explain this oversight. Such reasons include psychological discomfort, opportunity costs, administrative bureaucracy and a prevailing culture of managerialism. Recommendations are furnished to (...)
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