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  1. Vedāntadeśika’s Systematization of Rāmānuja’s Self-Surrender (Prapatti): A Study Based on the Nikṣeparakṣā.Manasicha Akepiyapornchai - 2022 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 26 (1):89-112.
    This article examines the Śrīvaiṣṇava validation of the doctrine of self-surrender to the Supreme God Viṣṇu. Prapatti is mentioned by Rāmānuja, the most authoritative teacher of the tradition, as an auxiliary to the path of devotion that he teaches as a means to mokṣa. After the time of Rāmānuja, prapatti was developed as an alternative means. However, the post-Rāmānuja teachers were committed to arguing that Rāmānuja teaches prapatti as an independent means. The article focuses on Vedāntadeśika, the most influential post-Rāmānuja (...)
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  2. The Subtlety of Subtales: Subaltern Voices of Sūkṣma Dharma in the Mahābhārata.Brian Black - 2022 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 26 (1):37-62.
    Many scholars have identified sūkṣma dharma as a central theme of the Mahābhārata. However, beyond recognizing it as an understanding of dharma that is elusive and ambiguous, there has been relatively little investigation into the meaning and implications of sūkṣma dharma. As this article shows, even if the central episodes of the main story leave sūkṣma dharma undefined or unclear, the Mahābhārata’s embedded narratives offer more explicit descriptions and demonstrations that can shed light on this otherwise elusive understanding of dharma. (...)
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  3. Tracing Well-Being: The Rise of Kalyāṇ in the Hindi-Hindu Public Sphere.Michal Erlich - 2022 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 26 (1):1-35.
    The pursuit of kalyāṇ is pivotal for many Hindus. The Hindi kalyāṇ is close, yet not equivalent, to the English term “well-being.” It is a desirable, utopian, holistic state of being that facilitates a range of pursuits: worldly and extra worldly, secular and religious, mundane and soteriological, material and spiritual. In other words, kalyāṇ is the aim of their lives as Hindus. This article aims to establish the widespread everyday use of kalyāṇ in contemporary North India, despite its absence from (...)
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  4. The Presence of the Real: Jalarāmkathā and the Experience of the Transcendent.Martin Wood - 2022 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 26 (1):113-134.
    Rarely is the presence of the Gujarati saint Jalarām Bāpā felt more immediately, and indeed collectively, by his devotees in India and throughout the diaspora than when his narrative is recited during the Jalarāmkathā. This article examines the multiexperiential nature of the Jalarāmkathā as it unfolds through various transcendental mediums, all of which center on the kathākār, a public teller of the narrative. It is framed by recent scholarly discussions regarding Robert A. Orsi’s suggestion that we need to go beyond (...)
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  5.  46
    Debating with Fists and Fallacies: Vācaspati Miśra and Dharmakīrti on Norms of Argumentation.Malcolm Keating - 2022 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 26 (April):63-87.
    The tradition of Nyāya philosophy centers on a dispassionate quest for truth which is simultaneously connected to soteriological and epistemic aims. This article shows how Vācaspati Miśra brings together the soteriological concept of dispassion with the discourse practices of debate, as a response to Buddhist criticisms in Dharmakīrti’s Vādanyāya. He defends the Nyāyasūtra’s stated position that fallacious reasoning is a legitimate means for a debate, under certain circumstances. Dharmakīrti argues that such reasoning is rationally ineffective and indicates unvirtuous qualities. For (...)
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