Year:

  1.  6
    After-Truth.Paul Dumouchel - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):1-13.
    Human beings, after all, provide for each other the most ingenious obstacles to what partial knowledge and minimal rationality they can hope to command.We tend to have a romantic view of liars, or rather of those who lie, and of how and of why they and we lie. A romantic view in the sense in which Girard uses that term in Deceit, Desire, and the Novel, whose French title was Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque, that is, "Romantic lie and novelistic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  5
    Desire and Conversion in The Death of Ivan Ilyich.Ryan Gerard Duns - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):215-237.
    Leo Tolstoy's The Death of Ivan Ilyich might well be read as a narrative outworking of Pascal's observation that "We run heedless into the abyss after putting something in front of us to stop us seeing it."1 That Ivan Ilyich, an ambitious mid-level Russian legal official, plummets into the abyss is incontestable, for the novella opens by announcing his death. What is debated is how he does so: On his deathbed does he merely resign himself to nothingness, or does he (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  2
    A Monadic Prelate Without Divine Rival: On Girard's Bifurcated Focus.Wiel Eggen - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):41-58.
    Girard counts as a Durkheimian for viewing religion as the social force that underpins society's cultural institutions. A basic difference, though, should be heeded. No doubt, he argues that the bloody solution of the originary mimetic crisis initiated traditions of sacrificial rituals with mythical justifications that crystallized in society's legal codes, ethical rules, and cultural habits, on which daily events of scapegoating rely. However, if this suggests that religion's basic aim is to be a buttress of the cultural order, it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  4
    Necessary Victims: William Shakespeare's Tragic Ethics of Identity.Ralph Hage - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):123-153.
    A drop of blood drawn from thy country's bosom Should grieve thee more than streams of foreign gore.—Shakespeare, First Part of King Henry the SixthA system of ethics produced by prohibitions is a community's condition of possibility. What maintains this system is the community's identity, the way members of the group mythically describe and convince themselves through mutual mimesis of their mutual belonging, that is, of their mutual ethics of nonviolence. This maintained space of ethical mutuality is defined against a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  4
    Joyous Sacrifice: On the Scapegoat as Voluntary Victim in "Song of Myself" and "Howl".Stéphanie Hage - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):81-99.
    "For never are the ways of music moved without the greatest political laws being moved."Whitman's "Song of Myself" and Ginsberg's "Howl" both contain the description of a voluntary self-sacrifice, symbolically committed by the poets themselves. In this article, we propose to study these sacrificial representations, and the mechanism underlying them, in the light of René Girard's scapegoat theory, in order to show the function that these sacrifices play in society. The analysis is also based on formal considerations, especially the use (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  2
    Recovering Rhetoric: René Girard as Theorhetor.Paul L. Lynch - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):101-122.
    The revival of religion is almost a matter of rhetoric. The work is difficult, perhaps impossible, but it at least reminds us that Our Lord asked us in His work to be not only as gentle as doves, but as wise as serpents.In this essay I argue that René Girard's project invites the difficult, perhaps impossible, work of inventing a revived Christian discourse.1 To suggest that Girard has left a rhetorical task may seem strange. Rhetoric, according to conventional wisdom, is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  2
    No End of (Mimetic) Crises? Reflections on Mimetic Escalation, Order, and the Nature of Peacemaking in the Shadow of Brexit.Duncan Morrow - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):15-40.
    In his final original book, Battling to the End, Girard could hardly have been clearer: "Violence" he wrote, "can no longer be checked. From this point of view we can say that the apocalypse has begun."1Faced with the rise of global Islamist terror and the declaration of a "war against terror," Girard observed the collapse of politics as a mechanism to contain violence. History is not inevitably and dialectically converging on a rational Hegelian Aufhebung but has the pattern of a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  2
    "Approved Flesh": The Sacrificial Foundations of Modernity in Peter Shaffer's Equus.Norrec Nieh - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):155-175.
    The fate of our times is characterized by rationalization and intellectualization and, above all, by the "disenchantment of the world."Modern Western civilization, in its curiosity toward the exotic, has avidly studied ritual in other societies, yet has tended to avoid the study of ritual in its own society.2 It is as if the contemporary West feels itself immune to ritual's "anachronistic" or "regressive" nature, which appears to contrast with the West's sense of its own enlightenment or progress. Peter Shaffer's Equus, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  1
    The Stones That the Builders Rejected: The Scapegoat Mechanism and Evolutionary Psychiatry.D. Vincent Riordan - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):59-79.
    Mental illness is difficult to reconcile with the Darwinian theory of natural selection. Major psychiatric conditions, such as psychosis and suicidality, often occur in young adults and impair reproductive potential, yet they also appear to be genetically mediated.1 The challenge for evolutionary psychiatry has been to explain not only how such seemingly disadvantageous genes have evaded natural selection, but also how the widespread vulnerability to such conditions ever became established in the human genome in the first place.2In Things Hidden Since (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  52
    The Satanic and the Theomimetic: Distinguishing and Reconciling "Sacrifice" in René Girard and Gregory the Great.Jordan Joseph Wales - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):177-214.
    Compelling voices charge that the theological notion of “sacrifice” valorizes suffering and fosters a culture of violence by the claim that Christ’s death on the Cross paid for human sins. Beneath the ‘sacred’ violence of sacrifice, René Girard discerns a concealed scapegoat-murder driven by a distortion of human desire that itself must lead to human self-annihilation. I here ask: can one speak safely of sacrifice; and can human beings somehow cease to practice the sacrifice that must otherwise destroy them? Drawing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues