Year:

  1.  9
    Introduction: Intersubjectivity, Desire, and Mimetic Theory:René Girard and Psychoanalysis.Pierpaolo Antonello & Alessandra Diazzi - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):1-7.
    The aim of this special collection of essays, titled Intersubjectivity, Desire, and Mimetic Theory: René Girard and Psychoanalysis, is to reappraise the relationship between René Girard's thought and the psychoanalytic tradition. The tripartite structure of the title clearly echoes the English title of Girard's first book, Deceit, Desire and the Novel, with which he introduced the psychological dynamics of mimetic desire as represented in modern European novels.1 Through the reference to the intentionally broad notions of "intersubjectivity," "desire," and "mimetic theory," (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  1
    René Girard, Friendship, and Battling to the End: A Conversation with Cesáreo Bandera.Cesáreo Bandera & Adam Ericksen - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):195-207.
    The following conversation took place at the 2017 Colloquium on Violence and Religion in Madrid, Spain. Cesáreo Bandera and Adam Ericksen discuss Bandera's friendship with Girard, their disagreements about mimetic theory, and hope in these apocalyptic times. This is an edited version of the transcript of a recoded interview. You can watch the video recording at The Raven Review at ravenfoundation.org.We are in your home country.Yes. In my home country. I am from the south, from Malaga. Malaga is straight south (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  5
    Sentiments of Resentment: Desiring Others, Desiring Justice.Elisabetta Brighi - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):179-194.
    In his recent book, Age of Anger, Pankaj Mishra considers the uncoordinated bursts of violence that have punctuated the world since the fall of the Berlin Wall as tangible manifestations of the latest wave of crisis in liberal modernity. Rather than fostering peace and prosperity across the globe, he argues, the economic globalization of the last half century has created a claustrophobic and unequal world populated by frustrated individuals prone to anger and revenge. "The result is, as Hannah Arendt feared, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  5
    A Mimetic Theoretical Approach to Multiculturalism: Normalizing the Singaporean Exception.John Choo - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):209-235.
    At the time of writing, the multicultural ideal, if there had ever been one, within North America and Western Europe appears to be in a state of unprecedented precariousness, given recent political developments. The term "multicultural" here, and in fact in the rest of this paper, refers not to a description of the prevailing state of affairs, but to a normative attitude, reflected in public policy, that seeks a relatively pluralist approach to "culture." Apparently confirming political pronouncements by then-UK Prime (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  1
    Notes on Elvio Fachinelli and René Girard: The Psychoanalysis of Dissent Meets Mimetic Theory.Alessandra Diazzi - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):109-122.
    In a short article on the practice of psychoanalysis in Italy, Sergio Benvenuto observes that the country has never been considered a central hub for the development and diffusion of the discipline. As a result, he notes, "very few are interested in Italian psychoanalysis: up until now, Italy has not produced as many famous 'masters' in this field as has Austria, Germany, Switzerland, France, Great Britain, the US, and other countries."1Although Benvenuto is right in claiming that the psychoanalytic panorama in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  5
    Divine but Not Sacred: A Girardian Answer to Agamben's The Kingdom and the Glory.Lyle Enright - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):237-249.
    Though the literature on the topic has been slim, several recent commentators have identified a close affinity between the philosophical project of Giorgio Agamben, as articulated in his Homo Sacer series, and René Girard's theory of mimetic rivalry with its resolution through sacrificial scapegoating.1 Both are theories of social unity made possible through highly ritualized forms of exclusion. Girard's work posits desire and its conflictual consequences as the ultimate ground for all social systems, while Agamben views the same systems with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  1
    Exploring Girard's Concerns About Human Proximity: Attachment and Mimetic Theory in Conversation.Kathryn M. Frost - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):47-63.
    René Girard developed his theory largely as a response to what he saw as Freud's profound discovery, namely, a recognition that violence and conflict are at the root of all social relations. Girard, however, rejected Freud's psychology of the autonomous subject and his emphasis on the family of origin dynamics in favor of the intersubjective experience of mimetic desire occurring between persons anywhere at any age. With imitation of others as the guiding theoretical principle of mimetic theory, Girard placed psychological (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  2
    From Mimetic Rivalry to Mutual Recognition: Girardian Theory and Contemporary Psychoanalysis.Scott R. Garrels & Joy M. Bustrum - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):9-46.
    Throughout his career, René Girard consistently positioned his mimetic theory as a far more cohesive account of the wide range of phenomena previously addressed by Sigmund Freud, from the nature of human desire all the way to the origin and structure of human culture and religion. Subsequent theories that took shape in psychoanalysis after Freud were not a part of Girard's ongoing discourse for at least two main reasons: Psycho-analysis was seen as a misguided endeavor with fundamentally incompatible concepts and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  1
    A New Way to Suffer: Girard, Rancière, and Political Subjectification.Iwona Janicka - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):161-177.
    The question of politics is underdeveloped in René Girard's mimetic theory. This can be fairly easily accounted for. First, mimesis is essentially an ethical mechanism. In Girard, it pertains both to a set of moral prescriptions and to an ethos, understood here as a way of being that exchanges harmful repetitions for favorable ones.1 Throughout his work, Girard advances an ethics of generosity that steers clear of reciprocity, which, in his framework, would lead to violence.2 Second, Girard concentrates on social (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  5
    Violence and the Mimetic Unconscious : The Contagious Hypothesis: Plato, Affect, Mirror Neurons.Nidesh Lawtoo - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):123-159.
    To Bill Johnsen, mimetic theorist and innovative editor.Have you not observed that imitations, if continued from youth far into life, settle down into habits and second nature in the body, the speech and the thought?Yes, we have observed the powers of mimesis. And if we reload Socrates's untimely observation for our contemporary, hypermimetic times, we cannot help but wonder yet again: What is the relation between violence, imitation, and the unconscious in a world increasingly dominated by virtual representations of violence, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  2
    Two Kinds of Unanimity: St. Benedict, René Girard, and Modern Democratic Governance.Nathan Lefler - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):273-285.
    Toward the end of his famous Rule, written late in his life, near the middle of the sixth century, St. Benedict provides instructions for the selection of an abbot, the leader and spiritual "father" of the cenobitic monastic community, who is to represent Christ to the men under his charge. The beginning of Chapter 64 of RB states: In the installation of an abbot, the proper method is always to appoint the one whom the whole community agrees to choose in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  2
    The Broken Thread: Cervantes, Don Quijote, and War Trauma.Martha J. Reineke - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):65-108.
    Miguel de Cervantes was taken captive in Algiers after the Battle of Lepanto and spent 5 years in prison.1 In his writings thereafter, recurring images and references to humans in captivity—cages, bondage, beatings—suggest that Cervantes remained haunted by his imprisonment. As Maria Antonia Garcés argues in Cervantes in Algiers: A Captive's Tale, Cervantes's writings allude to an "afterlife of trauma" that should be part of any analysis of his writings, including Don Quijote.2 Indeed, Garcés contends that, three centuries before Freud, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The French Revolution, Archives, and Mimetic Theory.Pierre Santoni - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):251-272.
    It is very widely accepted that the French Revolution represents a decisive moment in the history of archives, not only in France but throughout the world. The great German-born scholar Ernst Posner, writing in 1940, claimed that it "marks the beginning of a new era in archives administration."1 Posner's view has been reaffirmed many times since, in one form or another, by authors of various nationalities.In France itself this opinion is not contested. Rather than assert a claim of historical primacy, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues