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  1.  7
    From Quill to Mouse: Digitizing the ‘Woman of Letters’ 1861-1922.Ombretta Frau & Cristina Gragnani - 2015 - Humanist Studies and the Digital Age 4 (1):98-107.
    : This article describes a project in Italian Digital Women’s Studies, In-visiblewomen.org, which is currently being developed in collaboration with our two universities, and consists of an interpretive, thematic website on the material culture of Italian female intellectuals between 1861 and 1922. We envision In-visiblewomen.org as a tool that allows to investigate women’s agency in promoting social change and the interconnections between women writers’ material culture, their private space, their access to the public sphere and the impact of the new (...)
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  2.  8
    Circles: Networks of Reading.Massimo Lollini - 2015 - Humanist Studies and the Digital Age 4 (1):1-34.
    Welcome to the fourth issue of Humanist Studies & the Digital Age. It continues the discourse started in the third issue, “Textualities in the Digital Age”; this time we focus on the role of the reader in digital environments. An analysis of current digital projects follows the historical and theoretical premise.
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  3.  10
    E-Philology and Twitterature.Massimo Lollini & Rebecca Rosenberg - 2015 - Humanist Studies and the Digital Age 4 (1):116-163.
    This paper presents an original use of Twitter to interpret and rewrite the poems of Francesco Petrarca's Rerum vulgarium fragmenta implemented within the Oregon Petrarch Open Book OPOB). This activity was partially inspired by the idea of Twitterature developed by Alexander Aciman and Emmett Rensin; we believe with them that our digital time should develop new and more functional ways of addressing literary texts but at the same time we are convinced that the "burdensome duty of hours spent reading" cannot (...)
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  4.  7
    Re-Reading Petrarca in the Digital Era.Massimo Lollini & Pierpaolo Spagnolo - 2015 - Humanist Studies and the Digital Age 4 (1):60-97.
    As part of the seminar Re-reading Petrarch in the Digital Age –taught at the University of Oregon in Winter 2014– a digital close reading of Francesco Petrarca’s Rerum Vulgarium Fragmenta led to a series of parallel and entwined activities and projects. Deeply integrated with the Oregon Petrarch Open Book Project, the course was oriented towards the encoding of Petrarca’s masterpiece based on the implementation of a network of different themes. The various occurrences and data obtained from the encoding were collected (...)
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  5.  7
    From Fragment to Hypertext: Adding Layers of Reading.Ernesto Priani & Ana María Guzman Olmos - 2015 - Humanist Studies and the Digital Age 4 (1):108-115.
    In this paper we will suggest that a hypertextual representation of the text allows us to show different temporal layers of reading and lets us add new ones. We use the notion “layers of reading” as a metaphor to explain how, historically, each reading of a text creates a new layer, an independent “stratum of meaning” -to use a geological term-, that is superimposed to a previous reading. We think the digital edition and the digital reading could create a philosophical (...)
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  6.  11
    Change of Paradigm: From Individual to Community-Based Scholarship.Massimo Riva - 2015 - Humanist Studies and the Digital Age 4 (1):35-38.
    The title does not refer to the application of knowledge through faculty engagement in community-based research, teaching and service – something that is usually understood as community-engaged scholarship. The change of paradigm referred to in the title should be understood within the broader framework of the general transformation of our participatory or convergence culture in the age of social and “spreadable” media. As the Web 2.0 evolves toward the Web 3.0, or the semantic web, community-engaged scholarship remains one of the (...)
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  7.  10
    Digital Readers of Allusive Texts: Ovidian Intertextuality in the 'Commedia' and the Digital Concordance on 'Intertextual Dante'.Julie Van Peteghem - 2015 - Humanist Studies and the Digital Age 4 (1):39-59.
    This essay introduces the notion of a digital concordance as a reading and research tool to explore intertextual passages online, and illustrates how a digital concordance of highly allusive texts can change how we read and research such texts. I take as example the digital concordance on Intertextual Dante, a project on Digital Dante developed in collaboration with the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship at Columbia University, which in the first phase highlights the Ovidian intertextuality in Dante’s Divina Commedia. (...)
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