19 found

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  1.  1
    Examining the Use of Consent Forms to Promote Dissemination of Research Results to Participants.Dorothyann Curran, Mike Kekewich & Thomas Foreman - 2018 - Research Ethics 15 (1):1-28.
    It is becoming widely recognized that dissemination of research results to participants is an important action for the conclusion of a research study. Most research institutions have standardized consent documents or templates that they require their researchers to use. Consent forms are an ideal place to indicate that results of research will be provided to participants, and the practice of inserting statements to this effect is becoming more conventional. In order to determine the acceptance of this practice across Canada we (...)
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  2.  2
    Navigating Research Ethics in the Absence of an Ethics Review Board: The Importance of Space for Sharing.Cécile Giraud, Giuseppe Davide Cioffo, Maïté Kervyn de Lettenhove & Carlos Ramirez Chaves - 2018 - Research Ethics 15 (1):1-17.
    Ethics review committees have become a common institution in English-speaking research communities, and are now increasingly being adopted in a variety of research environments. In light of existing debates on the aptness of ethics review boards for assessing research work in the social sciences, this article investigates the ways in which researchers navigate issues of research ethics in the absence of a formal review procedure or of an ethics review board. Through the analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, the article (...)
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  3.  3
    Exploring the Socioethical Dilemmas in the Use of a Global Health Archive.Matthew James Vaughton Holmes, Isla-Kate Morris, Anthony Williams, Jennifer Le Blond, Victoria Cranna & Gail Davey - 2018 - Research Ethics 15 (1):1-9.
    A global health archive consisting of podoconiosis tissue slides and blocks, was donated to Brighton & Sussex Medical School in 2014. There is little guidance on the socioethical and legal issues surrounding the retrospective use of archived or ‘abandoned’ tissue samples, which poses a number of questions relating to the ethical standing of the archive.There is a great deal of interpretation in the guidelines that are currently in existence; however, modern ethical principles cannot be applied as it is not feasible (...)
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  4.  3
    Negotiating Access to Research Sites and Participants Within an African Context: The Case of Cameroon.Joyce Afuh Vuban & Elizabeth Agbor Eta - 2018 - Research Ethics 15 (1):1-23.
    This article argues that localizing access – a general ethical principle – is a workable strategy that can be used in approaching participants in qualitative research across disciplines and in coping with respective institutional practices in order to collect meaningful data. This article is based on the autobiographical, lived experiences of the authors during the period of their data collection in Cameroon in 2013 and 2015, by the second and first author, respectively. Therefore, generalization across a broader context is somewhat (...)
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  5.  1
    Responding to Devious Demands for Co-Authorship: A Rejoinder to Bülow and Helgesson’s ‘Dirty Hands’ Justification.Bor Luen Tang - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (4):1-7.
    Bülow and Helgesson discussed the practice of gift/honorary authorships and expounded on a most devious form of these, termed ‘hostage authorship’. The authors drew a parallel of such situations in research and publishing with the problem of ‘dirty hands’. In this case, acceding, albeit with regrets, may well be ‘… what we ought to do, even if it requires us to do something that is intrinsically bad’, especially if ‘this is both practically necessary and proportionate to the end’. Here, I (...)
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  6.  1
    ‘Google Wants to Know Your Location’: The Ethical Challenges of Fieldwork in the Digital Age.Sebastian van Baalen - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (4):1-17.
    Information communications technologies like laptops, smartphones and portable storage devices facilitate travel, communication and documentation for researchers who conduct fieldwork. But despite increasing awareness about the ethical complications associated with using ICTs among journalists and humanitarians, there are few reflections on digital security among researchers. This article seeks to raise awareness of this important question by outlining three sets of ethical challenges related to digital security that may arise during the course of field research. These ethical challenges relate to informed (...)
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  7.  6
    Ethics Review and Freedom of Information Requests in Qualitative Research.Kevin Walby & Alex Luscombe - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (4):1-15.
    Freedom of information requests are increasingly used in sociology, criminology and other social science disciplines to examine government practices and processes. University ethical review boards in Canada have not typically subjected researchers’ FOI requests to independent review, although this may be changing in the United Kingdom and Australia, reflective of what Haggerty calls ‘ethics creep’. Here we present four arguments for why FOI requests in the social sciences should not be subject to formal ethical review by ERBs. These four arguments (...)
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  8. Overcoming Ethical Barriers to Research.Helen E. Machin & Steven M. Shardlow - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (3):1-9.
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  9.  2
    Uncorking the Bottleneck in Gaining Sponsorship for Clinical Research.V. Ranieri, K. McKay, H. Stynes & E. Kennedy - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (3):1-4.
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  10.  4
    Decolonizing Both Researcher and Research and its Effectiveness in Indigenous Research.Ranjan Datta - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (2):1-24.
    How does one decolonize and reclaim the meanings of research and researcher, particularly in the context of Western research? Indigenous communities have long experienced oppression by Western researchers. Is it possible to build a collaborative research knowledge that is culturally appropriate, respectful, honoring, and careful of the Indigenous community? What are the challenges in Western research, researchers, and Western university methodology research training? How have ‘studies’ – critical anti-racist theory and practice, cross-cultural research methodology, critical perspectives on environmental justice, and (...)
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  11. Faking Participant Identity: Vested Interests and Purposeful Interference.Patricia Fronek & Lynne Briggs - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (2):1-5.
    Misrepresentation and mischief in the research process can impact on ethical conduct, the validity of findings and deliberately change the outcome. This short report presents a scenario about deliberate interference in adoption research by one organisation seeking accreditation to deliver adoption services. Unbeknown to the researchers, fake participants completed an online survey designed to capture the post-adoption needs of adult international adoptees living in Australia. Interference was unexpected as it was naively assumed that all stakeholders involved in adoption would be (...)
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  12.  1
    Constructing Ethical Research Narratives in Criminological Research.Ian Mahoney & Tony Kearon - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (2):1-5.
    This case study article draws upon experiences of a doctoral student and supervisor to reflect on the way in which we construct ethical narratives around our research. We seek to draw attention to the manner in which strict adherence to ERB guidelines can be problematic and risks causing more harm than it seeks to mitigate. We aim to show that we as researchers should focus on the potential harm caused to particularly vulnerable participants and draw attention to the need to (...)
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  13.  1
    Pragmatic Clinical Trials and the Consent Process.Blake Murdoch & Timothy Caulfield - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (2):1-14.
    Pragmatic clinical trials are a relatively new methodological approach to the execution of clinical research that can increase research efficiency and provide access to unique data. Some have suggested that the costs and delays associated with obtaining informed consent could make PCTs difficult or even impossible to execute. Alternative consent models have been proposed, some of which lower standards of disclosure, delay consent, or waive it altogether. We analyze the permissibility of changes to informed consent in the context of Canadian (...)
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  14.  7
    Mining Social Media Data: How Are Research Sponsors and Researchers Addressing the Ethical Challenges?Joanna Taylor & Claudia Pagliari - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (2):1-39.
    Background:Data representing people’s behaviour, attitudes, feelings and relationships are increasingly being harvested from social media platforms and re-used for research purposes. This can be ethically problematic, even where such data exist in the public domain. We set out to explore how the academic community is addressing these challenges by analysing a national corpus of research ethics guidelines and published studies in one interdisciplinary research area.Methods:Ethics guidelines published by Research Councils UK, its seven-member councils and guidelines cited within these were reviewed. (...)
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  15.  2
    Rethinking Research Ethics Committees in Low- and Medium-Income Countries.Luchuo Engelbert Bain, Ikenna Desmond Ebuenyi, Nkoke Clovis Ekukwe & Paschal Kum Awah - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (1):1-7.
    Key historical landmark research malpractice scandals that shocked the international community were the origin of the institution of ethics review prior to carrying out research involving humans. Nonetheless, it is plausible that unethical research is ongoing or may have been conducted in recent times that has escaped public notice, especially in the vulnerable low- and middle-income country contexts. The basic constitution of these committees at some point has not been clearly defined, with most scientists declaring political maneuvers at times. These (...)
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  16.  5
    Hostage Authorship and the Problem of Dirty Hands.William Bülow & Gert Helgesson - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (1):1-9.
    This article discusses gift authorship, the practice where co-authorship is awarded to a person who has not contributed significantly to the study. From an ethical point of view, gift authorship raises concerns about desert, fairness, honesty and transparency, and its prevalence in research is rightly considered a serious ethical concern. We argue that even though misuse of authorship is always bad, there are instances where accepting requests of gift authorship may nevertheless be the right thing to do. More specifically, we (...)
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  17.  3
    Expert Perspectives on Ethics Review of International Data-Intensive Research: Working Towards Mutual Recognition.Edward S. Dove & Chiara Garattini - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (1):1-25.
    Life sciences research is increasingly international and data-intensive. Researchers work in multi-jurisdictional teams or formally established research consortia to exchange data and conduct research using computation of multiple sources and volumes of data at multiple sites and through multiple pathways. Despite the internationalization and data intensification of research, the same ethics review process as applies to single-site studies in one country tends to apply to multi-site studies in multiple countries. Because of the standard requirement for multi-jurisdictional or multi-site ethics review, (...)
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  18. Who Protects Participants in Non-Inferiority Trials When the Outcome is Death?Walter Palmas - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (1):1-6.
    A non-inferiority design accepts the possibility of some efficacy loss, as part of a “successful”, statistically significant result. That loss may be excessive when the non-inferiority threshold is lenient. However, even stringent significance thresholds and safety monitoring may fail to adequately protect study participants when the primary outcome is death. The OPTIMAAL trial, a large randomized clinical trial performed in high-risk patients, is discussed as an example, using the Belmont Report principles as an ethical frame of reference. OPTIMAAL compared losartan, (...)
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  19. A Case Study of Researchers’ Knowledge and Opinions About the Ethical Review Process for Research in Botswana.Dimpho Ralefala, Joseph Ali, Nancy Kass & Adnan Hyder - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (1):1-14.
    Most countries, including Botswana, have established Institutional Review Boards to provide oversight of research involving human beings. Although much has been published on the structure and function of IRBs around the world, there is less literature that empirically describes the perspectives of stakeholders in low- and middle-income country settings regarding IRB processes. In this study, we employed primarily quantitative methods to examine the perceptions of researchers at the University of Botswana about the review of research protocols by local IRBs. Data (...)
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