35 found

Year:

  1. Understanding and Attitudes of the Jordanian Public About Clinical Research Ethics.Mera A. Ababneh, Sayer I. Al-Azzam, Karem Alzoubi, Abeer Rababa’H. & Saddam Al Demour - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):228-241.
    In Jordan, research ethics committees exist in most health settings. However, little is known about Jordanian public views regarding the ethics of clinical research. This study aimed to evaluate Jordanian public understanding and attitudes about ethics in clinical research. A questionnaire was used to collect information that included demographics, public knowledge, and attitudes towards ethics in clinical research. It was administered via face-to-face interviews in two major cities in Jordan from 1st June to 15th August 2017. Of the 2315 respondents, (...)
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  2.  2
    Ethical Challenges in Researching and Telling the Stories of Recently Deceased People.Glenys Caswell & Nicola Turner - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):162-175.
    This paper explores ethical challenges encountered when conducting research about, and telling, the stories of individuals who had died before the research began. Cases were explored where individuals who lived alone had died alone at home and where their bodies had been undiscovered for an extended period. The ethical review process had not had anything significant to say about the deceased ‘participants’. As social researchers we considered whether it was ethical to involve deceased people in research when they had no (...)
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  3.  2
    Community-Based Health Care Providers as Research Participant Recruitment Gatekeepers: Ethical and Legal Issues in a Real-World Case Example.Karen L. Celedonia, Michael W. Valenti, Marcelo Corrales Compagnucci & Michael Lowery Wilson - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):242-250.
    Community-based mental health care providers are increasingly contacted by external researchers for research study recruitment. Unfortunately, many do not possess the resources or personn...
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  4.  2
    The Responsibility of Knowledge: Identifying and Reporting Students with Evidence of Psychological Distress in Large-Scale School-Based Studies.Margaret L. Kern, Helen Cahill, Lucy Morrish, Anne Farrelly, Keren Shlezinger & Hayley Jach - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):193-216.
    The use of psychometric tools to investigate the impact of school-based wellbeing programs raises a number of ethical issues around students’ rights, confidentiality and protection. Researchers have explicit ethical obligations to protect participants from potential psychological harms, but guidance is needed for effectively navigating disclosure of identifiable confidential information that indicates signs of psychological distress. Drawing on a large-scale study examining student, school, and system-based factors that impact the implementation of a school-based social and emotional learning program, we describe patterns (...)
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  5.  5
    Unconsented Acknowledgments as a Form of Authorship Abuse: What Can Be Done About It?Mladen Koljatic - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):127-134.
    Unwelcome or unconsented acknowledgments is an unethical practice seldom addressed. It constitutes a form of authorship abuse perpetrated in the acknowledgments section of published research, where the victim is credited as having made a contribution to the paper, without having given their consent, and often without having seen a draft of the paper. The acknowledgment may be written in such a way as to imply endorsement of the study’s data and conclusions. Through a real-life case, this paper explores the issue (...)
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  6.  4
    Research Ethics in Practice: Challenges of Using Digital Technology to Embed the Voices of Children and Young People Within Programs for Fathers Who Use Domestic Violence.Katie Lamb, Cathy Humphreys & Kelsey Hegarty - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):176-192.
    There has been growing enthusiasm amongst those who undertake research with children, for the development of participatory and visual research methods. The greater availability and affordability of digital technology has meant that there has been greater scope for digital technology to support participatory research methods, or augment more traditional qualitative research methods. While digital technology provides new opportunities for qualitative researchers, they also come with a series of challenges – some of which have been grappled with by those using more (...)
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  7.  1
    Online Educational Research with Middle Adolescent Populations: Ethical Considerations and Recommendations.Erin Mackenzie, Nathan Berger, Kathryn Holmes & Michelle Walker - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):217-227.
    Adolescent populations have become increasingly accessible through online data collection methods. Online surveys are advantageous in recruiting adolescent participants and can be designed for adol...
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  8.  4
    Fostering the Trustworthiness of Researchers: SPECS and the Role of Ethical Reflexivity in Novel Neurotechnology Research.Paul Tubig & Darcy McCusker - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):143-161.
    The development of novel neurotechnologies, such as brain-computer interface and deep-brain stimulation, are very promising in improving the welfare and life prospects many people. These include life-changing therapies for medical conditions and enhancements of cognitive, emotional, and moral capacities. Yet there are also numerous moral risks and uncertainties involved in developing novel neurotechnologies. For this reason, the progress of novel neurotechnology research requires that diverse publics place trust in researchers to develop neural interfaces in ways that are overall beneficial to (...)
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  9.  3
    Moral Injury and the Need to Carry Out Ethically Responsible Research.Victoria Williamson, Dominic Murphy, Carl Castro, Eric Vermetten, Rakesh Jetly & Neil Greenberg - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):135-142.
    The need for research to advance scientific understanding must be balanced with ensuring the rights and wellbeing of participants are safeguarded, with some research topics posing more ethical quandaries for researchers than others. Moral injury is one such topic. Exposure to potentially morally injurious experiences can lead to significant distress, including post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and selfinjury. In this article, we discuss how the rapid expansion of research in the field of moral injury could threaten the wellbeing, dignity and integrity (...)
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  10.  3
    Preventing Ethics Dumping: The Challenges for Kenyan Research Ethics Committees.Kate Chatfield, Doris Schroeder, Anastasia Guantai, Kirana Bhatt, Elizabeth Bukusi, Joyce Adhiambo Odhiambo, Julie Cook & Joshua Kimani - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (1):23-44.
    Ethics dumping is the practice of undertaking research in a low- or middle-income setting which would not be permitted, or would be severely restricted, in a high-income setting. Whilst Kenya operates a sophisticated research governance system, resource constraints and the relatively low number of accredited research ethics committees limit the capacity for ensuring ethical compliance. As a result, Kenya has been experiencing cases of ethics dumping. This article presents 11 challenges in the context of preventing ethics dumping in Kenya, namely (...)
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  11.  1
    An Ethical Engagement: Creative Practice Research, the Academy and Professional Codes of Conduct.Kate MacNeill, Barbara Bolt, Estelle Barrett, Megan McPherson, Marie Sierra, Sarah Miller, Pia Ednie-Brown & Carole Wilson - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (1):73-86.
    This paper reports on the experiences of creative practice graduate researchers and academic staff as they seek to comply with the requirements of the Australian National Statement on the Ethical Conduct of Research Involving Humans. The research was conducted over a two-year period as part of a wider project ‘iDARE – Developing New Approaches to Ethics and Research Integrity Training through Challenges Presented by Creative Practice Research’. The research identified the appreciation of ethics that the participants acquired through their experience (...)
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  12.  3
    ‘The Time Where the British Took the Lead is Over’: Ethical Aspects of Writing in Complex Research Partnerships.Kristina Pelikan, Roger Jeffery & Thorsten Roelcke - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (1):3-22.
    Writing reflects some of the different characteristics of the language being used and of the people who are communicating. The present paper focusses on the internal written communication in international and inter-disciplinary research projects. Using a case study of an international public health research project, it argues that the authorship and the languages used in internal project communication are not neutral but help to generate or reinforce power hierarchies. Within research partnerships, language thus raises ethical issues that have so far (...)
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  13.  2
    To CAG or Not to CAG? Difficulties in Determining Submission to the Confidentiality Advisory Group: A Commentary.V. Ranieri, H. Stynes & E. Kennedy - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (1):120-124.
    The Confidentiality Advisory Group is a specialised body that advises the Health Research Authority and the Secretary of State for Health on requests for access to confidential information, in the absence of informed consent from its owners. Its primary role is to oversee the safe use of such information and to counsel the governing bodies mentioned above as to whether such use is appropriate or inappropriate. Researchers who seek access to England or Wales-based confidential data, for medical purposes that are (...)
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  14.  6
    Trust Trumps Comprehension, Visceral Factors Trump All: A Psychological Cascade Constraining Informed Consent to Clinical Trials: A Qualitative Study with Stable Patients.Michael Rost, Rebecca Nast, Bernice S. Elger & David Shaw - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (1):87-102.
    This paper addresses psychological factors that might interfere with informed consent on the part of stable patients as potential early-phase clinical trial participants. Thirty-six semistructured interviews with patients who had either diabetes or gout were conducted. We investigated stable patients’ attitudes towards participating in a fictitious first-in-human trial of a novel intervention. We focused on an in-depth analysis of those statements and explanations that indicated the existence of psychological factors impairing decision-making capacity. Three main themes emerged: insufficient comprehension of the (...)
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  15.  1
    On-Site Monitoring of Clinical Trials by an Ethics Committee in India: A Road Less Travelled.Nusrat Shafiq, Savita Kumari, Vivek Kumar, Vinita Suri, Muralidharan Jayashree, Ajay Duseja, Arun Bansal & Samir Malhotra - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (1):45-54.
    Monitoring of clinical trials is important to ensure adherence to protocol, to safeguard the rights of research participants and to achieve compliance with principles of good clinical practice. Recent regulatory changes in India require Ethics Committees to keep an oversight of ongoing clinical trials including on-site monitoring. In this article, we share the experience of on-site monitoring of clinical trials by the Ethics Committee of a tertiary care, academic and research centre in India. We found a large number of shortcomings (...)
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  16.  1
    Research Ethics Should Be Taught as Part of the NSW Higher School Certificate Curriculum.Natasha Todorov - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (1):66-72.
    The Higher School Certificate is a certificate that recognises the successful completion of secondary education in New South Wales, Australia. The most recent enrolment information available suggests that at least 13,472 students undertaking the NSW Higher School Certificate in 2019 conducted research projects that involved human participants. During the course of their high school education current HSC students are taught research design principles and statistics so that they are equipped to plan a research project and determine the meaning of the (...)
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  17.  5
    Patient Perspectives on Research Use of Residual Biospecimens and Health Information: On the Necessity of Obtaining Societal Consent by Creating a Governance Structure Based on Value-Sharing.Mayumi Yamanaka, Mika Suzuki & Keiko Sato - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (1):103-119.
    Very few attempts have been made to survey patient opinions, particularly regarding the use of residual biospecimens and health information in research, to clarify their values. We conducted a questionnaire survey that targeted outpatients of a university hospital to gauge their awareness levels and understand patient perspectives on research that uses these items. Few patients felt that obtaining individual consent for each research study was necessary. Most patients expressed the view that researchers should be obligated to inform them about the (...)
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  18.  5
    Research Ethics Courses as a Vaccination Against a Toxic Research Environment or Culture.Nicole Shu Ling Yeo-Teh & Bor Luen Tang - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (1):55-65.
    Hofmann and Holm’s recent survey on issues of research misconduct with PhD graduates culminated with a notable conclusion by the authors: ‘ Scientific misconduct seems to be an environmental issue as much as a matter of personal integrity’. Here, we re-emphasise the usefulness of an education-based countermeasure against toxic research environments or cultures that promote unethical practices amongst the younger researchers. We posit that an adequately conducted course in research ethics and integrity, with a good dose of case studies and (...)
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  19.  11
    Ethical Rationale for Better Coordination of Clinical Research on COVID-19.Francois Bompart - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-10.
    Hundreds of clinical trials of potential treatments and vaccines for the “coronavirus 19 disease” have been set up in record time. This is a remarkable reaction to the global pandemic, but the absence of a global coordination of clinical research efforts raises serious ethical concerns. Some COVID-19 patients might carry the burden of clinical trial involvement even though their trial cannot be completed as researchers are competing for patients. A shortage of medicines can occur when existing drugs are diverted for (...)
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  20. Pandemic Ethics: The Case for Risky Research.Richard Yetter Chappell & Peter Singer - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-8.
    There is too much that we do not know about COVID-19. The longer we take to find it out, the more lives will be lost. In this paper, we will defend a principle of risk parity: if it is permissible...
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  21.  4
    Ethical Research in the COVID-19 Era Demands Care, Solidarity and Trustworthiness.Kate Chatfield & Doris Schroeder - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-4.
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  22.  17
    Pandemic Vaccine Trials: Expedite, but Don’T Rush.Angus Dawson - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-12.
    It has been proposed that the urgency of having a vaccine as a response to SARS-CoV-2 is so great, given the potential health, economic and social benefits that we should override the established s...
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  23.  11
    The Ethics of COVID-19 Tracking Apps – Challenges and Voluntariness.Renate Klar & Dirk Lanzerath - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-9.
    As COVID-19 continues to spread, a variety of COVID-19 tracking apps have been introduced to help contain the pandemic. Deployment of this technology poses serious challenges of effectiveness, technological problems and risks to privacy and equity. The ethical use of CTAs depends heavily on the protection of voluntariness. Voluntary use of CTAs implies not only the absence of a legal obligation to employ the app but also the absence of more subtle forms of coercion such as enforced exclusion from certain (...)
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  24.  6
    Fostering Ethical Biomedical and Health Research in India During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Nandini K. Kumar & Vasantha Muthuswamy - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-10.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented, major challenges to the ethical conduct of research including challenges for the rapid and robust ethical review of biomedical research. The Indian...
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  25.  38
    COVID-19 Human Challenge Trials – What Research Ethics Committees Need to Consider.Lisa Tambornino & Dirk Lanzerath - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-11.
    To reduce the global burden of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is an urgent need to develop a safe vaccine. Vaccine development usually takes many years as it goes through several different phases. To hasten COVID-19 vaccine development, it has been suggested that the final stage could be replaced with a human challenge trial. Volunteers would be intentionally infected with SARS-CoV-2 to see how the vaccine candidate works. To intentionally infect a healthy human being with a potentially deadly virus is contrary (...)
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  26.  10
    COVID-19: Africa’s Relation with Epidemics and Some Imperative Ethics Considerations of the Moment.Godfrey B. Tangwa & Nchangwi Syntia Munung - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-11.
    COVID-19 is a very complex pandemic. It has affected individuals, different countries and regions of the world equally in some senses and differently in other senses. While sub-Saharan Africa has weathered a range of outbreaks of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, the manner in which the COVID-19 pandemic has evolved necessitates some observations, remarks and conclusions from our own situated observation point. Compared to previous epidemics/pandemics, many African countries have displayed a sense of solidarity in the face of COVID-19 that (...)
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  27.  5
    Islamic Concepts in Ethics of Pediatric Clinical Research.Areej A. G. AlFattani & Hala AlAlem - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (1-2):1-11.
    Background:Medical research on children has increased in the last 20 years. International ethical regulations for conducting clinical research on children may not pertain to Muslim communities wher...
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  28.  4
    What Constitutes Expertise in Research Ethics and Integrity?Robert Braun, Tine Ravn & Elisabeth Frankus - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (1-2):1-16.
    In this paper we reflect on the looming question of what constitutes expertise in ethics. Based on an empirical program that involved qualitative and quantitative as well as participatory research...
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  29.  3
    Should Research Misconduct Be Criminalized?Rafael Dal-Ré, Lex M. Bouter, Pim Cuijpers, Christian Gluud & Søren Holm - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (1-2):1-12.
    For more than 25 years, research misconduct is defined as fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism —although other research misbehaviors have been also added in codes of cond...
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  30.  3
    The Introduction of Research Ethics Review Procedures at a University in South Africa: Review Outcomes of a Social Science Research Ethics Committee.Simeon E. H. Davies - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (1-2):1-26.
    The research ethics committee is a key element of university administration and has gained increasing importance as a review mechanism for those institutions that wish to conduct responsible...
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  31.  3
    Authorship Order and Effects of Changing Bibliometrics Practices.Gert Helgesson - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (1-2):1-7.
    Although the authorship order on published research plays a significant role for scientific merit in many research contexts, and therefore should be handled with great care not least for the sake o...
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  32.  4
    Ethical Reflections on Children’s Participation in Educational Research During Humanitarian Crises.Fabiana Maglio & Tejendra Pherali - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (1-2):1-19.
    This paper aims to reflect upon ethical dilemmas arising from educational research in humanitarian contexts, particularly when involving children. In recognition of the paucity of knowledge on how...
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  33.  3
    Ethically Important Moments as Data: Reflections From Ethnographic Fieldwork in Prisons.Carol Robinson - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (1-2):1-15.
    Qualitative researchers often face unpredictable ethical issues during fieldwork. These may be regarded as ethical dilemmas that need to be ‘solved’, but Guillemin and Gillam’s concept of ‘ethicall...
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  34.  2
    Editorial: The Unexpected Power of Research Ethics.Doris Schroeder, Kate Chatfield & Sarah Edwards - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (1-2):1-3.
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  35.  2
    What Do Patients Value as Incentives for Participation in Clinical Trials? A Pilot Discrete Choice Experiment.Akke Vellinga, Colum Devine, Min Yun Ho, Colin Clarke, Patrick Leahy, Jane Bourke, Declan Devane, Sinead Duane & Patricia Kearney - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (1-2):1-12.
    Incentivising has shown to improve participation in clinical trials. However, ethical concerns suggest that incentives may be coercive, obscure trial risks and encourage individuals to enrol in cli...
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