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  1.  1
    The Public-Art Publics: An Analysis of Some Structural Differences Among Public-Art Spheres.Andrea Baldini - 2019 - Open Philosophy 2 (1):10-21.
    In this paper, I argue for what I define as the multiplicity thesis. According to MT, there is not a single public of public art, but a multiplicity of them. I defend MT both as a descriptive and a normative claim. I explore different types of publics of public art that can be distinguished from one another in terms of their different sizes. I expand my analysis of the differences among separate publics of public art by considering temporary and enduring (...)
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  2.  4
    Assessing the Intellectual Value of New Genre Public Art.Elisa Caldarola - 2019 - Open Philosophy 2 (1):22-29.
    Suzanne Lacy introduced the term ‘New Genre Public Art’ (NGPA) to refer to art practices that depart from those traditional of public art (such as installing works in parks and plazas) and focus instead on the direct engagement of artists with audiences to deal with pressing socio-political issues. In this paper, I argue that some works of NGPA should be valued for the intellectual value grounded in their artistic features, not dissimilarly to works of conceptual art. In developing my argument, (...)
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  3. New Public Monuments: Urban Art and Everyday Aesthetic Experience.Sanna Lehtinen - 2019 - Open Philosophy 2 (1):30-38.
    The role and function of public art is currently undergoing some large-scale changes. Many new artworks which are situated within the already existing urban sphere, seem to be changing the definition of public art, each in their own way. Simultaneously, there exists a trend that endorses more traditional forms of public art. Juxtaposing and comparing the aesthetic implications of different types of artworks, it is possible to see how they contribute to the contemporary understanding of the urban sphere. In this (...)
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  4. Walking as Intelligent Enactment: A New Realist Approach.Adam Lovasz - 2019 - Open Philosophy 2 (1):49-58.
    Walking is an activity that always unfolds within a certain landscape. Tim Ingold has used the notion of “taskscape” to denote pragmatic uses of terrain. Whilst walking, we come to intersect with a variety of taskscapes. As Julia Tanney has highlighted, formal language can only get us so far when thinking about spontaneous, non-theoretical and non-representational activities. Borrowing Gilbert Ryle’s distinction between “knowing that” and knowing how”, I argue for a concept of walking that does not privilege intentions. When somebody (...)
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  5.  3
    When Public Art Goes Bad: Two Competing Features of Public Art.Mary Beth Willard - 2019 - Open Philosophy 2 (1):1-9.
    Not all public art is bad art, but when public art is bad, it tends to be bad in an identifiable way. In this paper, I develop a Waltonian theory of the category of public art, according to which public art standardly is both accessible to the public and minimally site-specific. When a work lacks the standard features of the category to which it belongs, appreciators tend to perceive the work as aesthetically flawed. I then compare and contrast cases of (...)
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  6.  7
    The Evaluation of Discovery: Models, Simulation and Search Through “Big Data”.Kun Zhang, Joseph D. Ramsey & Clark Glymour - 2019 - Open Philosophy 2 (1):39-48.
    A central theme in western philosophy was to find formal methods that can reliably discover empirical relationships and their explanations from data assembled from experience. As a philosophical project, that ambition was abandoned in the 20th century and generally dismissed as impossible. It was replaced in philosophy by neo-Kantian efforts at reconstruction and justification, and in professional statistics by the more limited ambition to estimate a small number of parameters in pre-specified hypotheses. The influx of “big data” from climate science, (...)
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