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  1. Vagueness, Identity, and the Dangers of a General Metaphysics in Archaeology.Artur Ribeiro - 2021 - Open Philosophy 4 (1):20-35.
    Archaeology is currently bound to a series of metaphysical principles, one of which claims that reality is composed of a series of discrete objects. These discrete objects are fundamental metaphysical entities in archaeological science and posthumanist/new Materialist approaches and can be posited, assembled, counted, and consequently included in quantitative models or network models. The work by Sørensen and Marila shows that archaeological reality is not that discrete, that some objects cannot be easily identified, and that perhaps reality is not always (...)
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  2. Earth and World(S): From Heidegger’s Fourfold to Contemporary Anthropology.Carlos A. Segovia & Sofya Gevorkyan - 2021 - Open Philosophy 4 (1):58-82.
    This article aims at contributing to the contemporary reception of Heidegger’s thought in eco-philosophical perspective. Its point of departure is Heidegger’s claim, in his Bremen lectures and The Question Concerning Technology, that today the earth is submitted to permanent requisition and planned ordering, and that, having thus lost sight of its auto-poiesis, we are no longer capable of listening, tuning in, and singing back to what he calls in his course on Heraclitus the “song of the earth.” Accordingly, first we (...)
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    That Raw and Ancient Cold: On Graham Harman’s Recasting of Archaeology.Tim Flohr Sørensen - 2021 - Open Philosophy 4 (1):1-19.
    This is a comment to Graham Harman’s 2019 response to an article by Þóra Pétursdóttir and Bjørnar Olsen in which they propose that a materially grounded, archaeological perspective might complement Harman’s historical approach in Immaterialism. Harman responds that his book is indeed already more archaeological than historical, stipulating that history is the study of media with a high density of information, whereas archaeology studies media with a low density of information. History, Harman holds, ends up in too much detail, while (...)
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    Superficiality and Representation: Adding Aesthetics to “Knowledge Without Truth”.Gonzalo Vaillo - 2021 - Open Philosophy 4 (1):36-57.
    This article has two parts. The first one compares the ontological and epistemological implications of two main philosophical stances on how reality relates to appearance. I call the first group the “plane of superficiality,” where reality and appearance are the same; there is no gap between what a thing is and how it manifests itself. I call the second group “volume of representation,” in which reality is beyond appearances; there is an insurmountable gap between the thing and its phenomena. The (...)
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