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  1.  30
    Abstract Versus Causal Explanations?Alexander Reutlinger & Holly Andersen - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):129-146.
    In the recent literature on causal and non-causal scientific explanations, there is an intuitive assumption according to which an explanation is non-causal by virtue of being abstract. In this context, to be ‘abstract’ means that the explanans in question leaves out many or almost all causal microphysical details of the target system. After motivating this assumption, we argue that the abstractness assumption, in placing the abstract and the causal character of an explanation in tension, is misguided in ways that are (...)
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  2.  8
    Causal Projectivism, Agency, and Objectivity.Elena Popa - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):147-163.
    This article examines how specific realist and projectivist versions of manipulability theories of causation deal with the problem of objectivity. Does an agent-dependent concept of manipulability imply that conflicting causal claims made by agents with different capacities can come out as true? In defence of the projectivist stance taken by the agency view, I argue that if the agent’s perspective is shown to be uniform across different agents, then the truth-values of causal claims do not vary arbitrarily and, thus, reach (...)
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  3. Computers as a Source of A Posteriori Knowledge in Mathematics.Mikkel Willum Johansen & Morten Misfeldt - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):111-127.
    Electronic computers form an integral part of modern mathematical practice. Several high-profile results have been proven with techniques where computer calculations form an essential part of the proof. In the traditional philosophical literature, such proofs have been taken to constitute a posteriori knowledge. However, this traditional stance has recently been challenged by Mark McEvoy, who claims that computer calculations can constitute a priori mathematical proofs, even in cases where the calculations made by the computer are too numerous to be surveyed (...)
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  4.  1
    Science After the Practice Turn in the Philosophy, History, and Social Studies of Science. [REVIEW]Lucía Lewowicz - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):190-193.
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  5.  1
    The Content of Science Debate in the Historiography of the Scientific Revolution.John Nnaji & José Luis Luján - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):99-109.
    The issue of internalism and externalism in historiography of science was intensely debated two decades ago. The conclusions of such debate on the ‘context of science’ appear to be a reinstatement of the positivist view of the ‘content of science’ as comprising only ideas and concepts uninfluenced by extra-scientific factors. The description of the roles of politics, economy, and socio-cultural factors in science was limited only within the ‘context of science’. This article seeks to resituate the ‘content of science’ debate (...)
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  6.  6
    Chance and Temporal Asymmetry. [REVIEW]Patricia Palacios - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):185-187.
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  7. A History of Chinese Science and Technology, Volume 1. [REVIEW]Hao Qinggang - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):188-190.
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  8.  21
    Abstract Versus Causal Explanations?Alexander Reutlinger & Holly Andersen - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):129-146.
    In the recent literature on causal and non-causal scientific explanations, there is an intuitive assumption according to which an explanation is non-causal by virtue of being abstract. In this context, to be ‘abstract’ means that the explanans in question leaves out many or almost all causal microphysical details of the target system. After motivating this assumption, we argue that the abstractness assumption, in placing the abstract and the causal character of an explanation in tension, is misguided in ways that are (...)
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  9.  3
    Styles of Reasoning, Human Forms of Life, and Relativism.Luca Sciortino - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):165-184.
    The question as to whether Ian Hacking’s project of scientific styles of thinking entails epistemic relativism has received considerable attention. However, scholars have never discussed it vis-à-vis Wittgenstein. This is unfortunate: not only is Wittgenstein the philosopher who, together with Foucault, has influenced Hacking the most, but he has also faced the same accusation of ‘relativism’. I shall explore the conceptual similarities and differences between Hacking’s notion of style of thinking and Wittgenstein’s conception of form of life. It is a (...)
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  10.  1
    Tainted: How Philosophy of Science Can Expose Bad Science. [REVIEW]Arianne Shahvisi - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):193-196.
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  11.  9
    A History of the Brain: From Stone Age Surgery to Modern Neuroscience. [REVIEW]Tara H. Abraham - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):91-92.
  12.  2
    A Remarkable Journey: The Story of Evolution. [REVIEW]Eva Boon - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):88-90.
    A book review of R. Paul Thompson's "A Remarkable Journey: The Story of Evolution".
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  13.  12
    Scientism: The New Orthodoxy. [REVIEW]Jeroen de Ridder - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):93-95.
  14.  20
    Fundamentality, Effectiveness, and Objectivity of Gauge Symmetries.Aldo Filomeno - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):19-37.
    Much recent philosophy of physics has investigated the process of symmetry breaking. Here, I critically assess the alleged symmetry restoration at the fundamental scale. I draw attention to the contingency that gauge symmetries exhibit, that is, the fact that they have been chosen from an infinite space of possibilities. I appeal to this feature of group theory to argue that any metaphysical account of fundamental laws that expects symmetry restoration up to the fundamental level is not fully satisfactory. This is (...)
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  15.  3
    What Is an Immature Science?Ruth Hibbert - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):1-17.
    Cognitive and social sciences such as psychology and sociology are often described as immature sciences. But what is immaturity? According to the received view, immaturity is disunity, where disunity can usefully be cashed out in terms of having a plurality of disunified frameworks in play, where these frameworks consist of concepts, theories, goals, practices, methods, criteria for what counts as a good explanation, etc. However, there are some reasons to think that the cognitive and social sciences should be disunified in (...)
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  16.  16
    Was Feyerabend a Postmodernist?Ian James Kidd - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):55-68.
    ABSTRACTThis article asks whether the philosophy of Paul K. Feyerabend can be reasonably classified as postmodernist, a label applied to him by friends and foes alike. After describing some superficial similarities between the style and content of both Feyerabend’s and postmodernist writings, I offer three more robust characterisations of postmodernism in terms of relativism, ‘incredulity to metanarratives’, and ‘depthlessness’. It emerges that none of these characterisations offers a strong justification for classifying Feyerabend as ‘postmodern’ in any significant sense. Indeed, what (...)
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  17.  6
    Against the New Fictionalism: A Hybrid View of Scientific Models.Liu Chuang - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):39-54.
    This article develops an approach to modelling and models in science—the hybrid view—that is against model fictionalism of a recent stripe. It further argues that there is a version of fictionalism about models to which my approach is neutral and which makes sense only if one adopts a special sort of antirealism. Otherwise, my approach strongly suggests that one stay away from fictionalism and embrace realism directly.
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  18.  1
    Foucauldian Imprints in the Early Works of Ian Hacking.María Laura Martínez - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):69-84.
    Ian Hacking has defined himself as a philosopher in the analytic tradition. However, he has also recognized the profound influence that Michel Foucault had on much of his work. In this article I analyse the specific imprint of certain works by Foucault—in particular Les mots et les choses—in two of Hacking’s early works: Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy? and The Emergence of Probability. I propose that these texts not only share a debt of Foucauldian thought, but also are part (...)
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  19.  4
    Time: A Philosophical Introduction. [REVIEW]Emily Paul - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):85-88.
  20. Philosophy and the Precautionary Principle: Science, Evidence, and Environmental Policy. [REVIEW]Sofia Guedes Vaz - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):95-98.
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