7 found

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  1.  5
    Plato’s Theaetetus and the Hunting of the Proposition.Lesley Brown - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):268-288.
    Section 1 contrasts the approaches to Plato of F.M.Cornford and Gilbert Ryle, two of the early twentieth century’s leading Plato interpreters. Then I trace and evaluate attempts to discern in Plato’s Theaetetus a recognition of the role of the proposition. Section 2 focuses on the hunting of the proposition in Socrates’ Dream in the Theaetetus. Ryle, inspired by Logical Atomism, argued that Plato there anticipated an insight about the difference between names and propositions that Russell credited to Wittgenstein. I rehearse (...)
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  2. The Pursuit of Parmenidean Clarity.Jenny Bryan - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):218-238.
    This paper reconsiders the debates around the interpretation of Parmenides’ Being, in order to draw out the preconceptions that lie behind such debates and to scrutinize the legitimacy of applying them to a text such as Parmenides’ poem. With a focus on the assumptions that have driven scholars to seek clarity within the notoriously ambiguous verse of the poem, I ask whether it is possible to develop an analysis of Parmenides’ Being that is sympathetic both to his clear interest in (...)
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  3.  1
    The Scandal of Deduction and Aristotle’s Method for Discovering Syllogisms.Matthew Duncombe - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):289-311.
    If a deductive argument is valid, then the conclusion is not novel. If the conclusion of an argument is not novel, the argument is not useful. So, if a deductive argument is valid, it is not useful. This conclusion,, is unacceptable. Since the argument is valid, we must reject at least one premise. So, should we reject or? This puzzle is usually known as the ‘scandal of deduction’. Analytic philosophers have tried to reject but have assumed premise. I argue here (...)
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  4. Paying the Price: Contextualizing Exchange in Phaedo 69a–C.Kathryn Morgan - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):239-267.
    This paper uses a problematic passage at Phaedo 69a–c as a case study to explore the advantages we can gain by reading Plato in his cultural context. Socrates argues that the common conception of courage is strange: people fear death, but endure it because they are afraid of greater evils. They are thus brave through fear. He proposes that we should not exchange greater pleasures, pains, and fears for lesser, like coins, but that there is the only correct coin, for (...)
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  5.  1
    Introduction.Catherine Rowett - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):149-157.
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  6.  3
    Analytic Philosophy, the Ancient Philosopher Poets and the Poetics of Analytic Philosophy.Catherine Rowett - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):158-182.
    The paper starts with reflections on Plato’s critique of the poets and the preference many express for Aristotle’s view of poetry. The second part of the paper takes a case study of analytic treatments of ancient philosophy, including the ancient philosopher poets, to examine the poetics of analytic philosophy, diagnosing a preference in Analytic philosophy for a clean non-poetic style of presentation, and then develops this in considering how well historians of philosophy in the Analytic tradition can accommodate the contributions (...)
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  7.  3
    Drafted Into a Foreign War?: On the Very Idea of Ancient Philosophy as a Way of Life.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):183-217.
    This paper examines the central criticisms that come, broadly, from the modern, ‘analytic’ tradition, of Pierre Hadot’s idea of ancient philosophy as a way of life.: Firstly, ancient philosophy just did not or could not have involved anything like the ‘spiritual practices’ or ‘technologies of the self’, aiming at curing subjects’ unnecessary desires or bettering their lives, contra Hadot and Foucault et al. Secondly, any such metaphilosophical account of putative ‘philosophy’ must unacceptably downplay the role of ‘serious philosophical reasoning’ or (...)
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