15 found

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  1.  2
    Diana Quarantotto, L’universo senza spazio. Aristotele e la teoria del luogo, Bibliopolis, Naples, 2017, 290 p., ISBN 978-8870886481, € 29.75. [REVIEW]Giulio Di Basilio - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):232-236.
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  2. Diana Quarantotto, L’universo senza spazio. Aristotele e la teoria del luogo, Bibliopolis, Naples, 2017, 290 p., ISBN 978-8870886481, € 29.75L’universo senza spazio. Aristotele e la teoria del luogo. [REVIEW]Giulio Di Basilio - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):232-236.
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  3. Two Aspects of Moral Habituation in Aristotle’s Practical Science.Siyi Chen - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):213-231.
    Through a detailed reconstruction of the process of moral habituation, which includes both a desiderative and an intellectual aspect, I demonstrate in this essay that Aristotelian practical science does not make people practically wise on a ground and personal level, but teaches moral educators how to produce basically good men in and through practice. In particular, the formation of the correct wish for happiness is the natural culmination of desiderative habituation, and intellectual habituation that develops personal practical wisdom is mainly (...)
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  4.  2
    Plato’s Recollection Argument in the Philebus.Naoya Iwata - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):189-212.
    Many scholars have denied that Plato’s argument about desire at Philebus 34c10–35d7 is related to his recollection arguments in the Meno and Phaedo, because it is concerned only with postnatal experiences of pleasure. This paper argues against their denial by showing that the desire argument in question is intended to prove the soul’s possession of innate memory of pleasure. This innateness interpretation will be supported by a close analysis of the Timaeus, where Plato suggests that our inborn desires for food (...)
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  5.  2
    Sylvain Delcomminette, Pieter D’Hoine, Marc-Antoine Gavray , Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo. Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2015, Viii+364 P.; ISBN 978-90-0428217-9, € 126. [REVIEW]Peter Lautner - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):245-249.
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  6. Sylvain Delcomminette, Pieter D’Hoine, Marc-Antoine Gavray , Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo. Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2015, Viii+364 P.; ISBN 978-90-0428217-9, € 126.Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo. [REVIEW]Peter Lautner - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):245-249.
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  7.  5
    The Lives of Pythagoras: A Proposal for Reading Pythagorean Metempsychosis.Caterina Pellò - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):135-156.
    According to Dicaearchus, metempsychosis was the best known among Pythagoras’ teachings. In this paper, I investigate two features of Pythagorean metempsychosis: its non-retributive character and its epistemological value. I argue that the Pythagoreans did not conceive of reincarnation as a punishment for the wicked and a reward for the virtuous, but rather as a way to gain experience, knowledge and therefore wisdom. This reading enables us to throw light on the puzzling list of Pythagoras’ past lives, which includes Aethalides son (...)
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  8.  5
    Attila Németh, Epicurus on the Self, Routledge, London-New York, 2017, 205 P., ISBN 978-1-138-63385-8 [Hbk], £ 105Epicurus on the Self. [REVIEW]Francesco Verde - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):236-244.
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  9.  1
    Suicide in the Phaedo.Daniel Werner - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):157-188.
    In the Phaedo the character Socrates argues that suicide is morally wrong. This is in fact one of only two places in the entire Platonic corpus where suicide is discussed. It is a brief passage, and a notoriously perplexing one. In this article, I distinguish between two arguments that Socrates gives in support of his claim. I argue that one of them is not to be taken literally, while the other represents the deeper reason for the prohibition of suicide. I (...)
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  10.  4
    The Ontology and Syntax of Stoic Causes and Effects.Jean-Baptiste Gourinat - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (1):87-108.
    The ontology of Stoic causes and effects was clearly anti-platonic, since the Stoics did not want to admit that any incorporeal entity could have an effect. However, by asserting that any cause was the cause of an incorporeal effect, they returned to Plato’s syntax of causes in the Sophist, whose doctrine of the asymmetry of nouns and verbs identified names with the agents and verbs with the actions. The ontological asymmetry of causes and effects blocked the multiplication of causes by (...)
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  11.  14
    Passion, Impulse, and Action in Stoicism.Susan Sauvé Meyer - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (1):109-134.
    A familiar interpretation of the Stoic doctrine of the πάθη runs as follows: The Stoics claim the πάθη are impulses. The Stoics take impulses to be causes of action. So, the Stoics think the πάθη are causes of action Premise is uncontroversial, but the evidence for needs to be reconsidered. I argue that the Stoics have two distinct but related conceptions of ὁρμή – a psychological construal and a behavioural construal. On the psychological construal is true, but there is strong (...)
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  12.  4
    Why is the Cosmos Intelligent?Ricardo Salles - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (1):40-64.
    The present paper studies a family of Stoic proofs of the intelligence of the cosmos, i. e. of the thesis that the cosmos is intelligent in the strong sense that it is, as a whole, something that thinks. This family, ‘F2’, goes back to a proof, ‘XP’, found in Philebus 29a9–30 a8 and Xenophon Mem. 1.4.8. F2 infers the intelligence of the cosmos, as XP does, from the general idea that our intelligence proceeds from the cosmos, which is the ultimate (...)
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  13.  5
    Stoics and Their Critics on Diachronic Identity.David Sedley - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (1):24-39.
    This article is a return to a theme I first tackled in “The Stoic criterion of identity” : the Academics’ ‘Growing Argument’ and the Stoic response to its attack on diachronic identity. This time my aim is to separate out approximately five different stages of the debate between the two schools. This will be done by shifting more of the focus onto developments that seem likely to belong to the late second and/or early first century BC.
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  14.  4
    A Unified Notion of Cause.Katja Maria Vogt - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (1):65-86.
    Contrary to their predecessors, the Stoics put forward a unified notion of cause: a cause is a bodily because-of-which. Against the backdrop of Plato’s and Aristotle’s influential views, this is an original proposal. It involves the rejection of an earlier trend, according to which causes and explanations are closely associated. It also involves a pulling apart of causes and principles. And it comes with a charge against Plato and Aristotle, namely that they introduce a swarm of causes, a turba causarum.
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  15. The Resistance to Stoic Blending.Vanessa de Harven - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (pp. 1-23):1-23.
    This paper rehabilitates the Stoic conception of blending from the ground up, by freeing the Stoic conception of body from three interpretive presuppositions. First, the twin hylomorphic presuppositions that where there is body there is matter, and that where there is reason or quality there is an incorporeal. Then, the atomistic presupposition that body is absolutely full and rigid, and the attendant notion that resistance (antitupia) must be ricochet. I argue that once we clear away these presuppositions about body, the (...)
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