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  1.  3
    Sovereignty as a Motor of Global Conceptual Travel: Sanskritic Equivalents of “Law” in Bengali Discursive Production.Milinda Banerjee - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):487-506.
    How may one imagine the global travel of legal concepts, thinking through models of diffusion and translation, as well as through obstruction, negation, and dialectical transfiguration? This article offers some reflections by interrogating discourses produced by three celebrated Bengalis: the nationalist littérateur Bankimchandra Chattopadhyay, the Rajavamshi “lower-caste” peasant leader Panchanan Barma, and the international jurist Radhabinod Pal. These actors evidently took part in projects of vernacularizing legal–political frameworks of state sovereignty. They produced ideas of nexus between sovereignty, law, and “divine” (...)
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  2.  2
    Forum: Law, Empire, and Global Intellectual History: An Introduction.Milinda Banerjee & Kerstin von Lingen - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):467-470.
    In recent years, there has been a deepening convergence between scholarship on global intellectual history and on legal history. To take just one example, a recent book on international law, by Arnulf Becker Lorca, carries “global intellectual history” in its subtitle—a stance related to the author's emphasis on the constitutive role in the field of non-European legal actors. A sustained reflection on the convergence between legal studies and global intellectual history, however, still remains a desideratum, at least in the sense (...)
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  3.  5
    Haunted: On the New Arabic Translation of Sartre's Anti-Semite and Jew.Yoav di-Capua - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):443-466.
    Two years ago, without any apparent explanation, a little-known Egyptian scholar translated Jean-Paul Sartre's Anti-Semite and Jew into Arabic. Widely acknowledged as an experimental and highly influential theory of anti-Semitism in the 1960s, Sartre's text had already had a profound, yet indirect, influence on an entire class of left-wing Arab intellectuals who used it in order to figure out their relationship with the colonizer; that is, with their Otherness. Though these intellectuals read Anti-Semite and Jew in French, it still remained (...)
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  4.  4
    Charles Rollin and Universal History in America.Mark W. Graham - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):325-355.
    Whoever has travelled in the New England States will remember, in some cool village, the large farmhouse, with its clean-swept grassy yard … In the family “keeping-room,” as it is termed, he will remember the staid, respectable old bookcase, with its glass doors, where Rollin's History, Milton's Paradise Lost, Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, and Scott's Family Bible, stand side by side in decorous order, with multitudes of other books, equally solemn and respectable.Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin, 226.
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  5.  6
    “The Brides of Deconstruction and Criticism” and the Transformation of Feminism in the North American Academy.Gregory Jones-Katz - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):413-442.
    “The Brides of Deconstruction and Criticism,” an informal group of feminist literary critics active at Yale University during the 1970s, were inspired by second-wave feminist curriculum, activities, and thought, as well as by the politics of the women's and gay liberation movements, in their effort to intervene into patterns of female effacement and marginalization. By the early 1980s, while helping direct deconstructive reading away from the self-subversiveness of French and English prose and poetry, the Brides made groundbreaking contributions to—and in (...)
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  6. Rewording the Past: The Postwar Publication of a 1938 Lecture by Martin Heidegger - Corrigendum.Sidonie Kellerer - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):589-589.
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  7.  9
    Liberalism, Cultural Particularism, and the Rule of Law in Modern East Asia: The Anti-Confucian Essentialisms of Chen Duxiu and Fukuzawa Yukichi Compared.Kiri Paramore - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):527-542.
    How and why are universalist modes of political thought transformed into culturally essentialist and exclusionary practices of governance and law? This article considers this question by analyzing the interaction between Confucianism and liberalism in East Asia. It argues that liberalism, particularly as it was used in attacking Confucianism, was instrumental in embedding ideas of cultural particularism and cultural essentialism in the emergence of modern political thought and law in both China and Japan. Both Confucianism and liberalism are self-imagined as universalist (...)
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  8.  5
    Navigating the Postwar Liberal Order: Autonomy, Creativity and Modernism in Socialist Yugoslavia, 1949–1953.James M. Robertson - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):385-412.
    Between the years 1949 and 1953 the leaders of the Federative People's Republic of Yugoslavia embarked on a series of radical social and economic reforms that restructured state–society relations in line with a decentralized, participatory model of socialism. “Self-management socialism,” as this system became known, served to harmonize local revolutionary ambitions with the embedded liberalism of the postwar international order into which Yugoslavia sought to integrate. During the early reform period Yugoslav intellectuals reorganized socialist ideology around new understandings of autonomy (...)
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  9.  7
    Autonomy and Decentralization in the Global Imperial Crisis: The Russian Empire and the Soviet Union in 1905–1924.Ivan Sablin & Alexander Semyonov - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):543-560.
    This article brings the case of imperial transformation of the Russian Empire/Soviet Union into global discussions about empire, nationalism, and postimperial governance, and highlights the political and legal imaginaries that shaped this transformation, including their global and entangled character. This article argues that the legal and political discourses of decentralization, autonomism, and federalism that circulated at the time of the imperial crisis between the Revolution of 1905 and the adoption of the Soviet Constitution in 1924 contributed to the formation of (...)
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  10.  12
    Property and Political Norms: Hanafi Juristic Discourse in Agrarian Bengal.Andrew Sartori - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):471-485.
    This article explores the reception of discourses about land and property in Islamic jurisprudence in colonial Bengal. I argue that Hanafi fiqh provided a sophisticated conceptual repertoire for framing claims to property that agrarian political actors in Muslim Bengal drew upon. Yet the dominant framework for understanding property claims in postclassical jurisprudence was ill-fitted to claims of the kind that agrarian movements in colonial Bengal were articulating. As a result, twentieth-century agrarian movements in the region spoke the language of fiqh, (...)
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  11.  7
    Gauging the German Jewish.Daniel B. Schwartz - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):579-588.
    Few fields are as riddled with terminological indecision as “German Jewish thought.” One cannot invoke this sphere without immediately bumping up against essential questions of definition. Should membership within its bounds be reserved for those who wrote, primarily, as Jews for Jews, even if in a non-Jewish language? Or should its borders be expanded substantially to include Jewish contributions to secular German thought—or, perhaps more aptly put, secular thought in German, in order not to exclude the vast number of Central (...)
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  12.  11
    Credible Witnessing: A. R. Wallace, Spiritualism, and a “New Branch of Anthropology”.Efram Sera-Shriar - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):357-384.
    This paper situates Alfred Russel Wallace's spiritualist writings from his book Miracles and Modern Spiritualism against the backdrop of Victorian anthropology. It examines how he constructed his argument, and the ways in which he verified the trustworthiness of his evidence using theories and methods drawn from anthropology. Spirit investigations relied on personal testimony. Thus the key question was: who could be trusted as a credible witness? While much has been written on Wallace's inquiries into spirit phenomena, very little scholarship has (...)
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  13.  10
    Legal Flows: Contributions of Exiled Lawyers to the Concept of “Crimes Against Humanity” During the Second World War.Kerstin von Lingen - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):507-525.
    This article addresses the normative framework of the concept of “crimes against humanity” from the perspective of intellectual history, by scrutinizing legal debates of marginalized academic–juridical actors within the United Nations War Crimes Commission. Decisive for its successful implementation were two factors: the growing scale of mass violence against civilians during the Second World War, and the strong support and advocacy of “peripheral actors,” jurists forced into exile in London by the war. These jurists included representatives of smaller Allied countries (...)
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  14.  9
    Jewish Modern Law and Legalism in a Global Age: The Case of Rabbi Joseph Karo.Roni Weinstein - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):561-578.
    During the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, Rabbi Joseph Karo composed two major Jewish codes of law: the Beit Yosef, and its abridged version, Sulchan ‘Aruch. Though several centuries of legal discussion and scholarship have passed since their publication, these double codes of law were never superseded. This codification project defined the axial place of law in Jewish tradition. I argue that it responded to changes in legal processes and the enforcement of law that simultaneously transformed early modern Europe (...)
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