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  1.  3
    Resiliency or Resignation: Paul F. Lazarsfeld, Austro-Marxism, and the Psychology of Unemployment, 1919–1933.Charles H. Clavey - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):146-170.
    The Unemployed of Marienthal has long been esteemed as a classic of twentieth-century social science; its portrait of the effects of joblessness on individual minds and social institutions has inspired generations of researchers. But this reception has largely overlooked the political origins and implications of the study. This essay resituates Marienthal in the context of its creation and dissemination: the distinctive Marxism of interwar Austria. Specifically, it demonstrates that Marienthal introduced social-psychological methods and findings into Marxist debates about the present (...)
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  2.  8
    “I Didn't Say That”: Margaret Mead on Nature, Nurture, and Gender in the Nuclear Age.Elesha Coffman - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):202-222.
    The anthropologist Margaret Mead is widely known for stating that human nature is “almost unbelievably malleable,” meaning that individual identity—including gender—is shaped more by culture than by biology. Many feminists, notably Betty Friedan, seized on this idea as a tool for dismantling sexist biases but were dismayed when Mead's later work seemed to relegate women to a biologically determined, maternal role. Mead, however, argued strenuously in print and correspondence that she never intended to set nature against nurture, for she believed (...)
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  3.  8
    James Fitzjames Stephen and the Landscape of Victorian Political Thought.Greg Conti - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):261-274.
    In 1858 an aged and weakened James Stephen, the once-formidable “Over-Secretary of the Colonies” whose influence on the course of British imperial administration included such momentous tasks as drafting the bill to end slavery in the colonies and contributing to much of the administrative–constitutional groundwork for colonial self-government, wrote his son James Fitzjames words of encouragement on his rising writing career: “Time was when I enjoyed a repute as a writer of Edinburgh Reviews and from the bottom of my heart (...)
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  4.  4
    Dreaming Through the Ages: Towards a Global History of Utopian and Dystopian Thought.Christos Efstathiou - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):275-287.
    For the five hundred years since Thomas More first depicted the island of Utopia, the portrayal of an ideal social system has intrigued generations of authors. The concept served a double purpose: it applied to an ideal place but also an imaginary, unrealizable one. Although the search for utopia started from the Classical Age, More invented the genre and hundreds of utopian thinkers followed in his footsteps trying to predict how life would unfold and provide a detailed description of an (...)
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  5.  6
    Empires, Visible and Invisible.David C. Engerman - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):288-297.
    Over the last decade or so, intellectual historians in and beyond the US field have deepened their engagement with the historical profession's “transnational turn.” This welcome development should hardly be a surprise; after all the turn, which began for Americanists in the late 1990s, owed a good part of its erudition and its energy to some of the most distinguished intellectual historians of that time. Thomas Bender convened four conferences at NYU's La Pietra villa—itself part of some intellectual-history footnotes in (...)
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  6.  9
    Women's International Thought and the New Professions, 1900–1940.Valeska Huber, Tamson Pietsch & Katharina Rietzler - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):121-145.
    This article examines the “new professions” as alternative settings where women thought and wrote about the international. Presenting the case studies of Fannie Fern Andrews, Mary Parker Follett and Florence Wilson, it shows that, in emerging professional and disciplinary contexts that have hitherto lain beyond the purview of historians of international thought, these women developed their thinking about the international. The insights they derived from their practical work in schools, immigrant communities and libraries led them to emphasize the mechanics of (...)
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  7.  4
    History and Church History in the Catholic Enlightenment.Michael Printy - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):248-260.
    More than a century ago, the German Catholic historian Sebastian Merkle made the case for a specifically Catholic engagement with the Enlightenment. His audience was largely Protestant academics, who assumed that Protestantism and modernity went hand in hand. But Merkle also refuted wholesale condemnations of the Enlightenment by conservative Catholics, who blamed the movement for the ills that had beset the Church since the French Revolution and which were at the root of the liberal attack on Catholicism up through the (...)
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  8.  13
    Jalal’s Angels of Deliverance and Destruction: Genealogies of Theo-Politics, Sovereignty and Coloniality in Iran and Israel.Eskandar Sadeghi-Boroujerdi & Yaacov Yadgar - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):223-247.
    This article discusses the historical context of the famed dissident intellectual Jalal Al-e Ahmad’s travelogue documenting his visit to Israel in early 1963, posthumously titled Safar beh velayat-e ʿezraʾil, focusing on the political and intellectual context and reception of his controversial essay, in particular the brief infatuation of Iranian anti-Soviet socialists in the League of Iranian Socialists with socialist Zionism; Al-e Ahmad’s discussion of political sovereignty and theo-politics in modern Israel and the important insights and observations provided therein; and, finally, (...)
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  9.  1
    Jalal's Angels of Deliverance and Destruction: Genealogies of Theo-Politics, Sovereignty and Coloniality in Iran and Israel — CORRIGENDUM.Eskandar Sadeghi-Boroujerdi & Yaacov Yadgar - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):298-298.
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  10.  3
    The Internal Image: Mind and Brain in the Age of Charcot.Katrin Schultheiss - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):23-46.
    This article uses the work of French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot and his contemporaries to explore the central role played by internal or mental images in late nineteenth-century understandings of mental function. It argues that the assumed existence of internal images allowed scientists and clinicians of the time to integrate experimental psychological work on mental pathologies such as memory dysfunction, hysteria, hypnosis, and hallucination into contemporary research on brain physiology. The internal image—a general term that embraced concepts such as “memory images,” (...)
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  11.  3
    Liberalism, Property, and the Foundations of the Greek State.Michalis Sotiropoulos - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):1-22.
    How does a new state, born by way of revolution, produce its social and political institutions? This article explores this question by looking at the case of Greece after independence from the Ottomans. It focuses on the Greek civil jurists and provides a history of a liberal political program that was manifested in Roman-law jurisprudence. As elsewhere in Europe, so too for jurists in Greece, Roman law was both a consistent method for lawmaking and a powerful political ideology, one that (...)
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  12.  9
    In Search of Perfection: Neo-Spiritualism, Islamic Mysticism, and Secularism in Turkey.Kutluğhan Soyubol - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):70-94.
    This article scrutinizes a little-known venture in Turkish republican intellectual history, namely Turkish neo-spiritualism. Combining the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Western trend of modern spiritualism with its local dynamics and sociocultural structures, Turkish neo-spiritualism integrated the spiritual philosophies and practices of Western spiritualism with various doctrines of Islamic mysticism. It thus sheds light on the complex ways in which a form of knowledge that was originated and disseminated from the West was not derivative in its “imported” version. The article (...)
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  13.  2
    World History's Eurocentric Moment? British Internationalism in the Age of Asian Nationalism, C.1905–1931.Chika Tonooka - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):95-120.
    This article examines a particular moment in the twentieth century when a burgeoning internationalist movement in Britain in the wake of the First World War coincided with growing nationalist activities in the non-European world, notably in Asia. It explores the intellectual implications of this juncture through the lens of two prominent British internationalists, G. P. Gooch and H. G. Wells, who were central figures in a series of discussions on “world history” that emerged in Britain around this time. Through a (...)
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  14.  1
    G. K. Chesterton and Islam.Tom Villis - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):47-69.
    G. K. Chesterton's anti-Semitism has attracted much scholarly attention, but his views on Islam have largely passed without comment. This article situates Chesterton's writings in relation to historical views of Islam in Britain and the political, cultural and religious context of the early twentieth century. Chesterton's complex and contradictory opinions fail to support easy conclusions about the immutability of prejudice across time. His views of Islam are at times orientalist and at other times critical of imperialism and elitism. As well (...)
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  15.  6
    Keynes Goes Nuclear: Thomas Schelling and the Macroeconomic Origins of Strategic Stability.Benjamin Wilson - 2021 - Modern Intellectual History 18 (1):171-201.
    Among the most important ideas in Cold War nuclear strategy and arms control was that of “stability”—the notion that by protecting weapons for use in retaliation, the superpowers would be less likely to fight a thermonuclear war. Conventional wisdom among strategists and historians of strategy has long held that stability was inherent to the logic of rational nuclear deterrence. This essay shows the conventional wisdom to be mistaken. It examines the technical practice of Thomas Schelling, who introduced the stability idea (...)
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