13 found

Year:

  1.  18
    On Immanent Critique in Hegel’s Phenomenology.Michael A. Becker - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):224-246.
    I begin by identifying an ambiguity in the post-Hegelian literature on Immanent Critique, distinguishing two possible definitions: judging an object against its ‘internal’ norms; and accounting for one’s own standpoint with reference to the object. I then claim that both definitions are represented in Hegel’s Phenomenology, and develop extended interpretations of material from the Introduction in order to clarify and substantiate this thesis. This yields revisionist readings of the famous ‘internal criteria’ and ‘self examination’ tropes. My discussion builds towards elucidating (...)
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  2. Dean Moyar (Ed.). The Oxford Handbook of Hegel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. ISBN: 978-0-19-935522-8. Pp. 828. £110.00. [REVIEW]Isabell Dahms - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):342-347.
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  3.  12
    Tim Rojek. Hegels Begriff der Weltgeschichte. Eine Wissenschaftstheoretische Studie. Berlin and Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2017. ISBN 978-3-11-050147-6 (hbk). Pp. 310. €109.95, US $126.99, £100.00. ISBN 978-3-11-062696-4 (pbk). €19.95, US $22.99, £18.00. [REVIEW]Eric Michael Dale - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):321-325.
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  4.  11
    Hegel on Sophocles’ Oedipus the King and the Moral Accountability of Ancient Tragic Heroes.Rachel Falkenstern - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):159-176.
    This paper argues that Hegel’s account of subjectivity and agency as historically coined is essential to an accurate understanding of his theory of tragedy. Focusing on Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, I argue that Hegel’s historical account of agency is necessary for understanding his theory of the ancient tragic hero. Although Hegel’s theory of ancient tragedy is often described in terms of a conflict between ethical spheres embodied in two individuals, the conflict in Oedipus is between Oedipus’ deeds and his later (...)
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  5.  1
    Glenn Alexander Magee (Ed). Hegel and Ancient Philosophy: A Re-Examination. New York: Routledge, 2018. ISBN 978-1-138-09497-0. £120.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978-1-315-10586-4. £40.99 (Ebk). Pp. X + 207. [REVIEW]Dino Jakušić - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):334-337.
  6.  7
    Hegel and Marx on the Necessity of the Reign of Terror.David James - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):202-223.
    Both Hegel and Marx appear committed to the idea that the Reign of Terror was in some sense necessary. I argue that Hegel explains this necessity in terms of the concept of ‘absolute freedom’, together with the associated self-conception and normative picture of the world. It will be argued that Marx also views the Reign of Terror as necessary because of an abstract conception of political freedom and the citizen which conflicts with a determinate individuality that is characterized by particular (...)
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  7.  5
    The Normative Authority of Social Practices: A Critical Theoretical Reading of Hegel’s Introduction to the Philosophy of Right.Erick Lima - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):271-293.
    What follows is an attempt to interpret Hegel’s Introduction to the Philosophy of Right in a way that explores the thesis of reason’s social character in light of the recent debate on Hegel’s theory of practical normativity. The discussion aims to highlight Hegel’s commitment to a ‘reconstructive’ version of the ‘immanent transcendence’ motive of Critical Theory and, more generally, to a programmatic critique of ‘deficient’ rationality and its effects on practice.
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  8.  10
    Community in Hegel’s Social Philosophy.Simon Lumsden - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):177-201.
    In the Philosophy of Right Hegel argues that modern life has produced an individualized freedom that conflicts with the communal forms of life constitutive of Greek ethical life. This individualized freedom is fundamentally unsatisfactory, but it is in modernity seemingly resolved into a more adequate form of social freedom in the family, aspects of civil society, and ultimately the state. This article examines whether Hegel’s state can function as a community and by so doing satisfy the need for a substantial (...)
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  9.  6
    Paulo Diego Bubbio. God and the Self in Hegel: Beyond Subjectivism. Albany NY: SUNY Press, 2017. ISBN 978-1-4384-6525-8 (Pbk). ISBN 978-1-4384-6524-1 (Hbk). Pp. 228. $85.00/$22.95. [REVIEW]Cyril O'Regan - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):330-333.
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  10.  2
    Rebecca Comay and Bart Zantvoort (Eds.). Hegel and Resistance: History, Politics and Dialectics. London: Bloomsbury, 2018. ISBN-10: 1350003646. Pp. 205. £85.00 (Hbk). [REVIEW]Paul Raekstad - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):338-341.
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  11.  14
    Hegel’s Concept of Empfindung and the Debate on State Vs. Content Nonconceptualism.Federico Sanguinetti - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):294-320.
    In this paper, I suggest that Hegel’s concept of sensation can be fruitfully read against the background of the recent distinction between state vs. content nonconceptualism. I) I provide a brief outline of the distinctions that characterize the debate between state and content nonconceptualism. II) I discuss Hegel’s concept of sensation, arguing that Hegel’s concept of sensation is compatible with a certain version of content conceptualism that is combined with a ‘weak’ state nonconceptualism for adult, rational subjects and with a (...)
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  12.  12
    Hegel and Colonialism.Alison Stone - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):247-270.
    This article explores the implications of Hegel’s Philosophy of World History with respect to colonialism. For Hegel, freedom can be recognized and practised only in classical, Christian and modern Europe; therefore, the world’s other peoples can acquire freedom only if Europeans impose their civilization upon them. Although this imposition denies freedom to colonized peoples, this denial is legitimate for Hegel because it is the sole condition on which these peoples can gain freedom in the longer term. The article then considers (...)
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  13.  3
    W. H. Mander and Stamatoula Panagakou (Eds.). British Idealism and the Concept of the Self. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN 978-1-349-69111-1 (Pbk). ISBN 978-1-137-46670-9 (Hbk). Pp. 335. £74.99/£59.99. [REVIEW]David Weinstein - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin 41 (2):326-329.
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