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  1.  1
    Predicting Students’ Intention to Plagiarize: An Ethical Theoretical Framework.S. K. Camara, Susanna Eng-Ziskin, Laura Wimberley, Katherine S. Dabbour & Carmen M. Lee - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):43-58.
    This article investigates whether acts of plagiarism are predictable. Through a deductive, quantitative method, this study examines 517 students and their motivation and intention to plagiarize. More specifically, this study uses an ethical theoretical framework called the Theory of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior to proffer five hypotheses about cognitive, relational, and social processing relevant to ethical decision making. Data results indicate that although most respondents reported that plagiarism was wrong, students with strong intentions to plagiarize had a more positive (...)
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  2.  2
    Promoting Responsible Research Conduct: A South African Perspective.Lyn Horn - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):59-72.
    A great deal of effort has gone into developing capacity in the sphere of human research protection programmes in South Africa and Africa over the last decade or more, by several international organisations. However the promotion of the broader agenda of research integrity or ‘RCR’ has lagged behind. From a global perspective South Africa and other African countries are actively involved in research endeavours and collaborations across a very broad spectrum of scientific fields. For this research to fulfil its potential (...)
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  3.  1
    Reactively, Proactively, Implicitly, Explicitly? Academics’ Pedagogical Conceptions of How to Promote Research Ethics and Integrity.Heidi Hyytinen & Erika Löfström - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):23-41.
    This article focuses on academics’ conceptions of teaching research ethics and integrity. Seventeen academics from a Finnish research intensive university participated in this qualitative study. The data were collected using a qualitative multi-method approach, including think-aloud and interview data. The material was scrutinized using thematic analysis, with both deductive and inductive approaches. The results revealed variation in academics’ views on the responsibility for teaching research integrity, the methods employed to teach it and the necessity of intervening when misconduct occurs. The (...)
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  4. Do Birds of a Feather Cheat Together? How Personality and Relationships Affect Student Cheating.Alex J. Scrimpshire, Thomas H. Stone, Jennifer L. Kisamore & I. M. Jawahar - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):1-22.
    Academic misconduct is widespread in schools, colleges, and universities and it appears to be an international phenomenon that also spills over into the workplace. To this end, while a great deal of research has investigated various individual components such as, demographic, personality and situational factors that contribute to cheating, research has yet to examine why students help others cheat and which students are being asked to help others cheat. In this study, we investigated if the closeness of the relationship to (...)
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  5.  1
    Incongruences of Ethical and Legal Norms in Academia: The Case on Revocation of Doctoral Degrees.Loreta Tauginienė & Vaidas Jurkevičius - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):73-91.
    In the academic setting as in any organization legal norms prevail and are assumed to be congruent with ethical norms. Nevertheless, there are cases when the ratio of ethical and legal norms is inadequate and disproportional, especially those dealing with socially responsible decisions in academia. For this reason, the aim here is to analyse incongruences of ethical and legal norms related to the revocation of doctoral degrees in Lithuania, illustrated with examples of deviant behaviour by academic degree holders in terms (...)
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