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  1.  6
    App-centric Students and Academic Integrity: A Proposal for Assembling Socio-technical Responsibility.Theresa Ashford - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (1):35-48.
    Academic integrity is a complex problem that challenges how we view action, intentions, research, and knowledge production as human agents working with computers. This paper proposes that a productive approach to support AI is found at the nexus of behavioural ethics and a view of hybrid app-human agency. The proposal brings together AI research in behavioural ethics and Rest’s four stages of ethical decision-making which tracks the development of moral sensitivity, moral judgement, moral motivation and finally moral action combined with (...)
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  2.  8
    Back to the Classroom: Educating Sessional Teaching Staff about Academic Integrity.Ritesh Chugh, Jo-Anne Luck, Darren Turnbull & Edward Rytas Pember - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (1):115-134.
    The increased incidences of academic misconduct in universities are compromising the reputation of higher education in Australia and increasing the work of academics responsible for the delivery of quality learning outcomes to students. Confronted with increasing instances of academic dishonesty in university classrooms, universities play a pivotal role in ensuring their academic staff are well-equipped with academic integrity knowledge. It is therefore important to understand academic staff perspectives about the training their workplaces could provide them on academic integrity. Specifically, this (...)
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  3.  7
    Correction to: Back to the Classroom: Educating Sessional Teaching Staff about Academic Integrity.Ritesh Chugh, Jo‑Anne Luck, Darren Turnbull & Edward Rytas Pember - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (1):135-135.
    The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. On page 14 of the published PDF version of the article, first word of the first line, should read “Plagiarism incident reporting” not “Plagiarism”.
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  4.  5
    Cultural Differences in Academic Dishonesty: A Social Learning Perspective.Nhung T. Hendy, Nathalie Montargot & Antigoni Papadimitriou - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (1):49-70.
    In this study, we examined the role of social learning theory in explaining academic dishonesty among 673 college students in the United States, France, and Greece. We found support for social learning theory such that perceived peer dishonesty was incrementally valid as a predictor of self-reported academic dishonesty across three countries beyond personal factor of conscientiousness and demographic factor of age. Contrary to expectation, perceived penalty for academic cheating received support in the U.S. sample only. Justification for academic dishonesty contributed (...)
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  5.  10
    Normative Revisionism About Student Cheating.Odysseus Makridis & Fred Englander - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (1):1-23.
    This paper considers characteristic views advanced in the past fifteen years that may be considered relatively sympathetic to student practices of cheating on graded assignments or exams. We detect and analyze typical fallacies that are recurrent in articles that promote a revisionist view of cheating as morally permissible. We offer a general, deontological argument that cheating is immoral. The efforts to justify student cheating take several forms. For example, it has been argued that cheating may be tolerated if the student (...)
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  6.  3
    Correction to: Inconsistent Responses to Notifications of Suspected Plagiarism in Finnish Higher Education.Erja Moore - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (1):137-138.
    The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake.
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  7.  8
    A Thematic Review on Research Integrity and Research Supervision: Relationships, Crises and Critical Messages.Abdulghani Muthanna & Ahmed Alduais - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (1):95-113.
    This article focuses on reporting the relationship between research integrity and research supervision. Initially, it briefly discusses the positive research supervision. By following a detailed thematic analysis methodology, 66 published sources were compiled, disassembled, reassembled and interpreted. The findings of this study highlight that maintaining research integrity is the responsibility of all, and that more responsibility falls onto the shoulders of instructors and supervisors who need to ethically perform research supervision to maintain further research integrity. Further, they show crises related (...)
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  8.  7
    The Reversed Causalities of Doctoral Training on Research Integrity: A Case Study from a Medical Faculty in Denmark.Laura Louise Sarauw - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (1):71-93.
    Over the last decade, a plethora of international policies and guidelines on research integrity have been produced, and many countries have developed national codes of conduct. Recently, as a way of implementing these codes, institutions have begun offering mandatory training in research integrity for PhD fellows. This paper is based on a case study of a mandatory course in research integrity for PhD fellows at a faculty of medicine in Denmark. The study comprised a small survey, participatory fieldwork, and interviews (...)
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  9.  2
    A Persistent Academic Ethical Dilemma: Too Few Female Students in STEM Five Decades after Title IX.Kurt Stanberry, Camille Stanberry & Tyler Reeves - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (1):25-34.
    Research over the past three decades on the gender gap in STEM has consistently found an underrepresentation of females pursuing STEM degrees and careers. This is, at its foundation, an educational ethics issue. Schools at all levels, ranging all the way from middle school to graduate school, have a responsibility to prepare more females for careers in STEM. Experts have proposed a variety of fixes to encourage female students to study STEM, including increased funding, some of which have helped, and (...)
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