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  1.  2
    Academic Doping: Institutional Policies Regarding Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants in U.S. Higher Education.Ross Aikins, Xiaoxue Zhang & Sean Esteban McCabe - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (3):229-243.
    Academic integrity policies at 200 institutions of higher education were examined for the presence of academic prohibitions against the nonmedical use of prescription stimulants or any other cognitive enhancing drug. Researchers used online search tools to locate policy handbooks in a stratified random sample of IHE’s drawn from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System database, searching for NMUPS/CED use as violations of either academic integrity or alcohol and other drug policies. Of 191 academic integrity policies found online, NMUPS/CED prohibitions were (...)
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  2.  1
    Cross-Validation of the Reactions to Faculty Incivility Measurement Through a Multidimensional Scaling Approach.Alt Dorit & Itzkovich Yariv - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (3):215-228.
    Incivility in the academic arena elicits a wide range of reactions: it interferes with learning, increases stress, feelings of disrespect and helplessness. Although reactions to incivility were mainly tested in workplaces, an extensive, robust framework to explain and measure responses to faculty incivility is yet to be offered. This study used Facet theory approach with a multidimensional scaling method of smallest space analysis, and confirmatory factor analysis to confirm the theoretical structure of reactions to FI. A mapping sentence was constructed (...)
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  3.  3
    Outside the Classroom Walls: Perceptions of Professor Inappropriate Out-of-Class Conduct and Student Classroom Incivility Among American Business Students.Rebecca M. Chory & Evan H. Offstein - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (3):197-214.
    Under higher education’s contemporary consumer model, students are treated as customers and professors are encouraged to increase student engagement through more personal out-of-class interactions, often in social settings. In the course of this more personal student-faculty involvement, students inevitably encounter or learn of their professors’ occasional inappropriate or unethical behavior. In the present study, we investigated the impact of 145 American undergraduate Business students’ perceptions of their professors’ inappropriate out-of-class behavior on student beliefs and in-class behavior. Results indicate that student (...)
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  4.  7
    What is Working, What is Not, and What We Need to Know: A Meta-Analytic Review of Business Ethics Instruction.Kelsey E. Medeiros, Logan L. Watts, Tyler J. Mulhearn, Logan M. Steele, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (3):245-275.
    Requirements for business ethics education and organizational ethics trainings mark an important step in encouraging ethical behavior among business students and professionals. However, the lack of specificity in these guidelines as to how, what, and where business ethics should be taught has led to stark differences in approaches and content. The present effort uses meta-analytic procedures to examine the effectiveness of current approaches across organizational ethics trainings and business school courses. to provide practical suggestions for business ethics interventions and research. (...)
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  5.  2
    Conceptions of Plagiarism and Problems in Academic Writing in a Changing Landscape of External Regulation.Erika Löfström, Elisa Huotari & Pauliina Kupila - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (3):277-292.
    The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of the use of text-matching software on teachers’ and students’ conceptions of plagiarism and problems in academic writing. An electronic questionnaire included scale items, structured questions, and open-ended questions. The respondents were 85 teachers and 506 students in a large Finnish university. Methods of analysis included exploratory factor analysis, t-test, and inductive content analysis. Both teachers and students reported increased awareness of plagiarism and improvements in writing habits, as well as (...)
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  6.  9
    How Prevalent is Contract Cheating and to What Extent Are Students Repeat Offenders?J. Curtis Guy & Clare Joseph - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (2):115-124.
    Contract cheating, or plagiarism via paid ghostwriting, is a significant academic ethical issue, especially as reliable methods for its prevention and detection in students’ assignments remain elusive. Contract cheating in academic assessment has been the subject of much recent debate and concern. Although some scandals have attracted substantial media attention, little is known about the likely prevalence of contract cheating by students for their university assignments. Although rates of contract cheating tend to be low, criminological theories suggest that people who (...)
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  7.  2
    An Assessment of Sustainability Integration and Communication in Canadian MBA Programs.Cathy Driscoll, Shelley Price, Margaret McKee & Jason Nicholls - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (2):93-114.
    This paper explores how sustainability has been integrated into and communicated in Canadian Master’s of Business Administration programs. We content analyzed university, business school, and MBA program mission and values statements; communicated strategic priorities; and relevant academic calendar content, as well as sustainability rankings and select media depictions of sustainable MBA programs and practices. We explore the potential for greenwashing practices in relation to the integration of sustainability in business education. We found some evidence of a decoupling between university and/or (...)
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  8.  4
    Perceptions of and Attitudes Toward Plagiarism and Factors Contributing to Plagiarism: A Review of Studies. [REVIEW]Fauzilah Md Husain, Ghayth Kamel Shaker Al-Shaibani & Omer Hassan Ali Mahfoodh - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (2):167-195.
    The abundance of information technology and electronic resources for academic materials has contributed to the attention given to research on plagiarism from various perspectives. Among the issues that have attracted researchers’ attention are perceptions of plagiarism and attitudes toward plagiarism. This article presents a critical review of studies that have been conducted to examine staff’s and students’ perceptions of and attitudes toward plagiarism. It also presents a review of studies that have focused on factors contributing to plagiarism. Our review of (...)
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  9.  1
    Severity of Types of Violations of Research Ethics: Perception of Iranian Master’s Students of Translation.Masood Khoshsaligheh, Milad Mehdizadkhani & Sareh Keyvan - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (2):125-140.
    Violations of research ethics including a varieties of plagiarism by students in Iran is a concern which has lately called promising levels of attention as rules are updated and better enforced and more awareness is being raised. As to deal with any problem, a full understanding of its nature is necessary, the current study focused on how a sample of Iranian students construe this phenomenon. To collect the necessary data, an original questionnaire with 34 closed-ended items included the most common (...)
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  10.  1
    Ethical Behavioral Intention in an Academic Setting: Models and Predictors.Lori N. K. Leonard, Cynthia K. Riemenschneider & Tracy S. Manly - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (2):141-166.
    This study examines the theory of planned behavior and the multidimensional ethics scale. Variables from both are included to determine which ones significantly correlate with student ethical behavioral intention in an academic setting. Using a survey, responses are collected from undergraduate business students from two southwestern universities in the United States using a scenario-based approach, looking at individual situations and group situations. SmartPLS was used to assess the results for four scenarios. From the theory of planned behavior, attitude was a (...)
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  11.  2
    Predicting Students’ Intention to Plagiarize: An Ethical Theoretical Framework.S. K. Camara, Susanna Eng-Ziskin, Laura Wimberley, Katherine S. Dabbour & Carmen M. Lee - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):43-58.
    This article investigates whether acts of plagiarism are predictable. Through a deductive, quantitative method, this study examines 517 students and their motivation and intention to plagiarize. More specifically, this study uses an ethical theoretical framework called the Theory of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior to proffer five hypotheses about cognitive, relational, and social processing relevant to ethical decision making. Data results indicate that although most respondents reported that plagiarism was wrong, students with strong intentions to plagiarize had a more positive (...)
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  12.  3
    Promoting Responsible Research Conduct: A South African Perspective.Lyn Horn - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):59-72.
    A great deal of effort has gone into developing capacity in the sphere of human research protection programmes in South Africa and Africa over the last decade or more, by several international organisations. However the promotion of the broader agenda of research integrity or ‘RCR’ has lagged behind. From a global perspective South Africa and other African countries are actively involved in research endeavours and collaborations across a very broad spectrum of scientific fields. For this research to fulfil its potential (...)
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  13.  2
    Reactively, Proactively, Implicitly, Explicitly? Academics’ Pedagogical Conceptions of How to Promote Research Ethics and Integrity.Heidi Hyytinen & Erika Löfström - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):23-41.
    This article focuses on academics’ conceptions of teaching research ethics and integrity. Seventeen academics from a Finnish research intensive university participated in this qualitative study. The data were collected using a qualitative multi-method approach, including think-aloud and interview data. The material was scrutinized using thematic analysis, with both deductive and inductive approaches. The results revealed variation in academics’ views on the responsibility for teaching research integrity, the methods employed to teach it and the necessity of intervening when misconduct occurs. The (...)
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  14. Do Birds of a Feather Cheat Together? How Personality and Relationships Affect Student Cheating.Alex J. Scrimpshire, Thomas H. Stone, Jennifer L. Kisamore & I. M. Jawahar - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):1-22.
    Academic misconduct is widespread in schools, colleges, and universities and it appears to be an international phenomenon that also spills over into the workplace. To this end, while a great deal of research has investigated various individual components such as, demographic, personality and situational factors that contribute to cheating, research has yet to examine why students help others cheat and which students are being asked to help others cheat. In this study, we investigated if the closeness of the relationship to (...)
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  15.  1
    Incongruences of Ethical and Legal Norms in Academia: The Case on Revocation of Doctoral Degrees.Loreta Tauginienė & Vaidas Jurkevičius - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):73-91.
    In the academic setting as in any organization legal norms prevail and are assumed to be congruent with ethical norms. Nevertheless, there are cases when the ratio of ethical and legal norms is inadequate and disproportional, especially those dealing with socially responsible decisions in academia. For this reason, the aim here is to analyse incongruences of ethical and legal norms related to the revocation of doctoral degrees in Lithuania, illustrated with examples of deviant behaviour by academic degree holders in terms (...)
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