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  1.  1
    A Philosophy of Music Education According to Kant.Adrian Darnell Barnes - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (2):33-39.
    Since the 1950s, the philosophy shared among many in the field of music education is that music education should "develop the aesthetic potential, with which every human being is endowed, to the highest possible level."1 This philosophy, presented by Charles Leonhard and Robert House in Foundations and Principles of Music Education, highlights theirs and others' philosophy of music education and the arts as a whole. Most notably, John Dewey's Art as Experience, Susan Langer's Philosophy in a New Key, and William (...)
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  2.  1
    Literature, Rival Conceptions of Virtue, and Moral Education.David Carr - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (2):1-16.
    On an increasingly popular ethical perspective, to become a moral agent is to acquire qualities of virtuous character as broadly conceived in a tradition going back to Aristotle.1 For Aristotle, however, since the acquisition of such qualities is not merely a matter of coming to behave in a prescribed way but of acquiring capacities for deliberation and judgment about what is morally required in variable circumstances, virtuous agency is also significantly a matter of wisdom, knowledge, and understanding. So how do (...)
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  3.  1
    Cultural Intentions, Reference, and Art.Mark Lafrenz - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (2):105-124.
    Cultural intentions, understood as enabling conditions, some physical and technological, others conceptual and theoretical, make it possible for artists to create the artworks they create. They play an ineliminable role in the mechanism of reference for artifact-kind terms, including "art." Because of the crucial role that cultural intentions play in the mechanism of reference for artifact-kind terms, the reference of such terms cannot be properly understood in the same way as the reference of natural-kind terms, for intentions of any kind (...)
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  4. Can Irony Enrich the Aesthetic Imagination?: Why Søren Kierkegaard's Explanation of Irony Is Better Than Richard Rorty's.Dennis L. Sansom - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (2):17-32.
    I have two aims. I want to show first that a proper understanding and use of irony can enrich the aesthetic imagination and, second, that Søren Kierkegaard's description of irony rather than Richard Rorty's better explains how irony enriches the aesthetic imagination. The paper's central claim is that aesthetic imagination springs from experiencing the necessary tension between appearances and reality and that irony, correctly employed, accentuates in our thinking the imagination required to keep this tension in our representations, thereby enabling (...)
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  5.  2
    Art Restoration and Its Contextualization.A. Scott David - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (2):82-104.
    Art restoration has been around as long as human beings have been involved with artifacts and works of art. Pliny mentions the Shrine of Ceres in the Circus Maximus at Rome.1 When the shrine was undergoing restoration, the embossed work of the walls was cut out and enclosed in framed panels, and figures were taken from the pediment and dispersed. Alteration, or the lack of it, clearly impacts the aesthetic appreciation of works of art, and the hermeneutics of that debate (...)
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  6.  1
    A Critique of Doubt: Questioning the Questioning Method as a Means of Obtaining Knowledge.David Swartz - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (2):40-52.
    There appears to be a certain presumption of innocence involved in the asking of questions, versus a contrary presupposition of authority involved in answering them. Has anyone ever tried to put into question the question's presupposition of innocence? Just what is implied in a question? And to what extent does what is implied in a question determine its answer? In what follows, I draw attention to the role questions play in determining their possible responses, and, as a consequence, I ask (...)
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  7. Temporality, Pleasure, and the Angelic in Teaching: Toward a Pictorial-Ontological Turn in Education.Joris Vlieghe & Tyson E. Lewis - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (2):59-81.
    In this article, we explore the possibilities that works of art might possess for looking in original and unforeseen ways into something that, at first sight, has little to do with arts and artistic practice. To be more precise, we present here three artistic representations, taken from various times and style periods, that depict a well-known figure in art history: angels. A detailed description and analysis of these images give us the opportunity to figure out something about another figure, which (...)
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  8. Consciousness and Death in Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago.S. K. Wertz - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (2):53-58.
    The novel Doctor Zhivago has not received the attention it has deserved lately—even much less for its philosophical ideas—so in this essay I want to bring attention to Boris Pasternak's notion of the nature of consciousness, which I find quite interesting. Yurii Zhivago, one of the principal characters in Doctor Zhivago, says the following about the experience of death: Will you [Anna Ivanovona] feel pain? Do the tissues feel their disintegration? In other words, what will happen to your consciousness? But (...)
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  9.  5
    The Aesthetic Value of Performing Music.Gilead Bar-Elli - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):84-97.
    And indeed we think it not manly to perform music, except when drunk or for fun.Composing, performing, and listening are three familiar musical practices, each having various forms and manifestations. Aesthetic value is usually ascribed to objects—whether artistic or natural. But “object” needs to be understood here in a very wide sense, including, for example, a theatrical production or a ballet. In dealing with music, I assume that complete works are the primary bearers of such value, but we need not (...)
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  10. Groove: A Phenomenology of Rhythmic Nuance by Tiger C. Roholt.Andrew Kania - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):115-119.
    Musicians of all sorts talk of getting “into a groove,” whether using those words or others; musical listeners also talk about the groove of a passage of music, a performance, or a recording. In his four-chapter essay, Groove, Tiger Roholt offers answers to questions that seem obvious candidates for philosophical inquiry yet that few philosophers have even touched on: what is a groove, exactly, and what is it to perceive or understand—to get— a groove? His answers are intriguing, not just (...)
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  11. An Aesthetic Analysis of Confucian Teaching and Learning: The Case of Qifashi Teaching in China.Meng Lingqi & Uhrmacher P. Bruce - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):24-44.
    In comparative studies, Confucian teaching and learning have multiple meanings. On the one hand, they refer to contemporary educational practices and contexts in Asian countries and regions such as mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore. Comparative researchers contend that Confucian heritage Culture, a mixed and blended cultural tradition of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism, has heavily influenced these countries and regions.1 As a result, their educational practices and contexts are different from those in Western countries.2 One indication (...)
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  12.  2
    The Uses of Poetry: Renewing an Educational Understanding of a Language Art.Karen Simecek & Viv Ellis - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):98-114.
    Poetry holds an important place as part of our cultural heritage.1 However, despite poetry’s apparent cultural value, there have been surprisingly few attempts to articulate clearly how this should be reflected in the teaching curriculum in our schools and universities. As a consequence of this lack of clarity, the cultural value of poetry gives way to the increasing emphasis on providing instrumental justification for the teaching curriculum; including poetry in the curriculum is often justified in terms of promoting transferable skills (...)
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  13. Of Research, Passion, and Art.Peter C. Sonderen - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):54-68.
    What we had in common was the desire for research, a boundless curiosity and a passion for all art.The few words of the above quotation identify the ingredients that were to form the basis of what we now call scholarship and art: curiosity, desire and longing, boundlessness, research, and passion. They were written by a Dutch philosopher and draughtsman some five years before the French Revolution and an unknown number of years before we in the West began increasingly referring to (...)
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  14.  1
    Sound Studies and Music Education.Matthew D. Thibeault - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):69-83.
    Elliot Eisner notes, “The kinds of nets we know how to weave determine the kinds of nets we cast. These nets, in turn, determine the kinds of fish we catch.”1 Sound studies is a recently emerged interdisciplinary field that draws upon the social sciences and humanities in support of a broad range of inquiry into music and sound. Weaving new approaches that cast interesting questions that yield fascinating catches, sound studies has much to offer those looking to expand or challenge (...)
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  15. Ken of Kin: Aesthetic Experience of the Forest.Dennis Vickers - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):15-23.
    In 2012, Qatar’s royal family bought one of five Paul Cezanne paintings titled The Card Players for approximately $250 million. By way of contrast, a 160-acre plot of hardwood forest in Forest County Wisconsin is now for sale for $250,000. The painting is roughly three feet high by four feet wide. The 160-acre forest is 880 square yards or twice the size of the area around Walden Pond that so inspired Henry David Thoreau and twice the size of Aldo Leopold’s (...)
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  16.  2
    Walter Benjamin: "The Storyteller" and the Possibility of Wisdom.White Richard - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):1-14.
    In 1936, Walter Benjamin published two important essays. The first and certainly the most celebrated is “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” which considers the place of art in contemporary mass society.1 In this essay, Benjamin offers an account of art that emphasizes its origin in religion and ritual. We may think of the magnificent cave paintings that were discovered in Lascaux, the frescoes that filled churches in Renaissance Italy, and the correlative sense of art as (...)
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  17.  1
    The Problem of the Correct Answer.Matthew D. Ziff - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):45-53.
    If you do not know the correct answer, guess.Design addresses need, of various types. A designer “designs” to address, to propose a possibility, or to meet a need. A great variety of things are designed: shoes, posters, watches, houses, televisions, keyboards, movies, washing machines, toasters, belts, and cars, to mention only some.A designer, be he or she an architect, interior designer, graphic designer, product designer, or industrial designer, nearly always provides drawings, models, written descriptions, and overarching ideas in response to (...)
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