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  1.  49
    Better to be a Pig Dissatisfied than a Plant Satisfied.Ethan C. Terrill & Walter Veit - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (4):1-17.
    In the last two decades, there has been a blossoming literature aiming to counter the neglect of plant capacities. In their recent paper, Miguel Segundo-Ortin and Paco Calvo begin by providing an overview of the literature to then question the mistaken assumptions that led to plants being immediately rejected as candidates for sentience. However, it appears that many responses to their arguments are based on the implicit conviction that because animals have far more sophisticated cognition and agency than plants, and (...)
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  2.  2
    When Cows Become Heroes: The Construction of Animal Subjectivity and Environmental Sustainability in the Swedish Organic food Sector.Josefin Velander - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (3):1-18.
    An escalating consumption of animal products characterizes contemporary Western society, resulting in severe environmental consequences and heightened exploitation of animals. Among these issues, livestock production stands out as particularly detrimental due to its significant climate impact and land usage. Paradoxically, the Swedish organic food sector positions cattle as central to achieving sustainable food production. This article delves into the strategies employed by organic organizations to legitimize the consumption of cattle’s meat and dairy. The aim is to examine how Swedish organic (...)
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  3.  22
    Ambivalence in Environmental Care: Marine Care Ethics and More-Than-Human Relations in the Conservation of Seagrass Posidonia oceanica.Jose A. Cañada - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (2):1-18.
    Posidonia oceanica is an endemic seagrass from the mediterranean that provides key ecosystem services. A protected species, its presence is regressing due to anthropogenic pressures, some associated to the tourism economy that much of the Mediterranean coast depends on. In 1992, the European Union declared it a priority habitat, and since the early 2000s, it has occupied a central space in marine conservation debates in the Balearic Islands. Popularly known as Posidonia, this seagrass went from being considered dirt that ruined (...)
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  4.  4
    Review of Harris, T., & Gibbs, T. (2023).Food in a Just World: Compassionate Eating in a Time of Climate Change. John Wiley & Sons. [REVIEW]Aviva Chomsky - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (2):1-3.
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  5.  27
    CLIMAVORE: Divesting from Fish Farms Towards the Tidal Commons.Daniel Fernández Pascual & Alon Schwabe - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (2):1-22.
    In Scotland, residents have fought open-net salmon farms and their toll on human and nonhuman bodies for decades. This paper recollects seven years of work in Skye and Raasay, two islands off the northwest coast of the country, developing strategies to divest away from salmon aquaculture. Addressing the contemporary wave of underwater clearances created by UK’s top food export industry, it unpacks the implementation of a transition into alternative horizons by embracing the legacies of toxicity inherited from salmon extractivist industries. (...)
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  6.  17
    Recipes for the Future of Seaweed Aquaculture.Melody Jue - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (2):1-14.
    Climate cuisine is about eating the future you want into being. In this article, I examine how seaweed recipes can be forms of climate fiction through the way that the reader is invited to participate in sustainable foodways. I examine several popularizations of seaweed aquaculture that imagine practices of eating and growing seaweeds. Their formal similarities center on participation: they include the direct address of the reader through the second person voice, and position themselves as instructional models. Bren Smith’s Eat (...)
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  7.  2
    Correction: Farming non-typical sentient species: ethical framework requires passing a high bar.Siobhan Mullan, Selene S. C. Nogueira, Sérgio Nogueira-Filho, Adroaldo Zanella, Nicola Rooney, Suzanne D. E. Held & Michael Mendl - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (2):1-2.
    More widespread farming of species not typically used as livestock may be part of a sustainable approach for promoting human health and economic prosperity in a world with an increasing population; a current example is peccary farming in the Neotropics. Others have argued that species that are local to a region and which are usually not farmed should be considered for use as livestock. They may have a more desirable nutrient profile than species that are presently used as livestock. It (...)
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  8.  16
    Farming non-typical sentient species: ethical framework requires passing a high bar.Siobhan Mullan, Selene S. C. Nogueira, Sérgio Nogueira-Filho, Adroaldo Zanella, Nicola Rooney, Suzanne D. E. Held & Michael Mendl - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (2):1-18.
    More widespread farming of species not typically used as livestock may be part of a sustainable approach for promoting human health and economic prosperity in a world with an increasing population; a current example is peccary farming in the Neotropics. Others have argued that species that are local to a region and which are usually not farmed should be considered for use as livestock. They may have a more desirable nutrient profile than species that are presently used as livestock. It (...)
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  9.  25
    Community-Centred Environmental Discourse: Redefining Water Management in the Murray Darling Basin, Australia.Amanda Shankland - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (2):1-20.
    The Australian government's response to the Millennium Drought (1997–2010) has been met with praise and contestation. While proponents saw the response as timely and crucial, critics claimed it was characterized by government overreach and mismanagement. Five months of field research in farm communities in the Murray Darling Basin (MDB) identified two dominant discourses: administrative rationalism and a local community-based discourse I have termed community-centrism. Administrative rationalism reflects the value of scientific inquiry in service to the state and is the dominant (...)
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  10.  42
    Shallow vs. Deep Geoethics: Moving Beyond Anthropocentric Views.Giovanni Frigo, Luiz Anselmo Ifanger, Roberto Greco, Helen Kopnina & Rafaela Hillerbrand - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (1):1-18.
    At its inception, geoethics was envisioned as a type of professional ethics concerned with the moral implications of geoscientific research, applications, and practices. More recently, however, some scholars have proposed versions of geoethics as public and global ethics. To better understand these developments, this article considers the relationship between geoethics and environmental ethics by exploring different aspects of the human-nature relation (i.e., the moral status and role of humans in relation to the non-human world). We start by noting that the (...)
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  11.  12
    Ethical Challenges in Mariculture: Adopting a Feminist Blue Humanities Approach.Jesse D. Peterson - 2024 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 37 (1):1-18.
    As mariculture—the cultivation of aquatic organisms in marine environment—intensifies to meet the demands of sustainable blue growth and national policies, novel ethical challenges will arise. In the context of ethics, primary concerns over aquaculture and mariculture tend to stay within differing value-based perspectives focused on benefits to human and non-human subjects, specifically animal welfare and animal rights. Nonetheless, the burgeoning field of feminist blue humanities provides ethical considerations that extend beyond animal subjects (including humans), often because of its concerns with (...)
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