Year:

  1.  1
    The Pedigree Dog Breeding Debate in Ethics and Practice: Beyond Welfare Arguments.Bernice Bovenkerk & Hanneke J. Nijland - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (3):387-412.
    Pedigree dog breeding has been the subject of public debate due to health problems caused by breeding for extreme looks and the narrow genepool of many breeds. Our research aims to provide insights in order to further the animal-ethical, political and society-wide discussion regarding the future of pedigree dog breeding in the Netherlands. Guided by the question ‘How far are we allowed to interfere in the genetic make-up of dogs, through breeding and genetic modification?’, we carried out a multi-method case-driven (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Ethics of Dietary Guidelines: Nutrients, Processes and Meals.Michiel Korthals - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (3):413-421.
    Dietary guidelines are mostly issued by agrifood departments or agencies of governments, and are the result of power play between interest groups and values. They have considerable influence over food preferences and purchases of consumers. Ethical problems are at stake not only with respect to power strategies and their influence on consumers. In this paper I will consider three different types of guidelines: a nutrient oriented type, a process oriented type and a meal oriented type. In the nutrient oriented guidelines (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. One Health Goes to India.Zohar Lederman - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (3):457-463.
    In this paper, the author reports on a One Health trip to India that he recently led as part of Yale-NUS Learning Across Boundaries Program. It is an attempt not only to integrate OH education into non-medical programs but also to integrate environmental ethics education into OH curricula.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Beyond Connectivity: The Internet of Food Architecture Between Ethics and the EU Citizenry.Luca Leone - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (3):423-438.
    This contribution deals with the ethical challenges arising from the IoT landscape with reference to a specific context, i.e. the realm of agri-food. In this sector, innumerable web-connected tools, platforms and sensors are constantly interacting with consumers/users/citizens, by reshaping and redefining the core elements and functions of machine–human being relationships. By sketching out the main pillars which ethics of the Internet of Food is founded on, my argument posits that the civic hybridization of knowledge production mediated by IoT technologies may (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. The Cross-Cultural Importance of Animal Protection and Other World Social Issues.Michelle Sinclair & Clive J. C. Phillips - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (3):439-455.
    In an increasingly global landscape, NFP initiatives including those addressing animal protection, are increasingly operating cross-borders. Doing so without respect, local engagement, and a thorough understanding of the issues of concern is fraught with danger, and potentially wasteful of resources. To this purpose, we sought to understand attitudes to the importance of 13 major world social issues in relation to animal protection by surveying 3433 students from at least 103 universities across 12 nations. The emergence of a ‘nature trifecta’ was (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    Sustainability Matrix: Interest Groups and Ethical Theories as the Basis of Decision-Making.Markus Vinnari, Eija Vinnari & Saara Kupsala - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (3):349-366.
    During the past few decades, the global food system has confronted new sustainability challenges related not only to public health and the environment but also to ethical concerns over the treatment of farmed animals. However, the traditional threedimensional framework of sustainable development is ill equipped to take ethical concerns related to non-human animals into account. For instance, the interests of farmed animals are often overridden by objectives associated with social, economic or environmental sustainability, despite their vast numbers and influence on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  4
    Sharing the Earth: A Biocentric Account of Ecological Justice.Anna Wienhues - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (3):367-385.
    Although ethical and justice arguments operate in two distinct levels—justice being a more specific concept—they can easily be conflated. A robust justification of ecological justice requires starting at the roots of justice, rather than merely giving, for example, an argument for why certain non-human beings have moral standing of some kind. Thus, I propose that a theory of ecological justice can benefit from a four-step justification for the inclusion of non-human beings into the community of justice, starting with Hume’s circumstances (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  3
    Time for a New EU Regulatory Framework for GM Crops?Zetterberg Charlotta & Björnberg Karin Edvardsson - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (3):325-347.
    In recent years, the EU legislation on genetically modified crops has come under severe criticism. Among the arguments are that the present legislation is inconsistent, disproportionate, obsolete from a scientific point of view, and vague in terms of its scope. In this paper, the EU GM legislation is analysed based on five proposed criteria: legal certainty, non-discrimination, proportionality, scientific adaptability, and inclusion of non-safety considerations. It is argued that the European regulatory framework does not at present satisfy the criteria of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  4
    Climate Change and the Need for Intergenerational Reparative Justice.Ben Almassi - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):199-212.
    Environmental philosophies concerning our obligations to each other and the natural world too rarely address the aftermath of environmental injustice. Ideally we would never do each other wrong; given that we do, as fallible and imperfect agents, we require non-ideal ethical guidance. Margaret Walker’s work on moral repair and Annette Baier’s work on cross-generational communality together provide useful hermeneutical tools for understanding and enacting meaningful responses to intergenerational injustice, and in particular, for anthropogenic climate change. By blending Baier’s cross-generational approach (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Ethical Approach to Fluoridation in Drinking Water Systems of UK and Turkey.Asude Ateş & Çiğdem Özer - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):171-178.
    The practice of adding substances to make water safe to drink and its consequential effects on human health have been a contentious matter for a long time. In this study, the addition of fluoride in drinking water was evaluated after examining two different countries: Britain and Turkey. This study has used an independent and ethical approach taking into account the cautious but assertive dentists’ comments on the addition of fluoride for years. This research focuses on a comparative analysis of Britain, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  5
    Environmentally Virtuous Agriculture: How and When External Goods and Humility Ethically Constrain Technology Use.J. Barker Matthew & Lettner Alana Friend - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):287-309.
    This paper concerns virtue-based ethical principles that bear upon agricultural uses of technologies, such as GM crops and CRISPR crops. It does three things. First, it argues for a new type of virtue ethics approach to such cases. Typical virtue ethics principles are vague and unspecific. These are sometimes useful, but we show how to supplement them with more specific virtue ethics principles that are useful to people working in specific applied domains, where morally relevant domain-specific conditions recur. We do (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    Environmental Ethics and Biomimetic Ethics: Nature as Object of Ethics and Nature as Source of Ethics.Henry Dicks - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):255-274.
    While the contemporary biomimicry movement is associated primarily with the idea of taking Nature as model for technological innovation, it also contains a normative or ethical principle—Nature as measure—that may be treated in relative isolation from the better known principle of Nature as model. Drawing on discussions of the principle of Nature as measure put forward by Benyus and Jackson, while at the same time situating these discussions in relation to contemporary debates in the philosophy of biomimicry : 364–387, 2011; (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  6
    Taxing Meat: Taking Responsibility for One’s Contribution to Antibiotic Resistance.Giubilini Alberto, Birkl Patrick, Douglas Thomas, Savulescu Julian & Maslen Hannah - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):179-198.
    Antibiotic use in animal farming is one of the main drivers of antibiotic resistance both in animals and in humans. In this paper we propose that one feasible and fair way to address this problem is to tax animal products obtained with the use of antibiotics. We argue that such tax is supported both by deontological arguments, which are based on the duty individuals have to compensate society for the antibiotic resistance to which they are contributing through consumption of animal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  6
    A Virtue of Precaution Regarding the Moral Status of Animals with Uncertain Sentience.Simon Knutsson & Christian Munthe - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):213-224.
    We address the moral importance of fish, invertebrates such as crustaceans, snails and insects, and other animals about which there is qualified scientific uncertainty about their sentience. We argue that, on a sentientist basis, one can at least say that how such animals fare make ethically significant claims on our character. It is a requirement of a morally decent person that she at least pays attention to and is cautious regarding the possibly morally relevant aspects of such animals. This involves (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  1
    Corporate Social Responsibility: Exploring a Framework for the Agribusiness Sector.Henrike Luhmann & Ludwig Theuvsen - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):241-253.
    Corporate social responsibility has long been an issue for research and practice. More recently, in response to growing public scrutiny, it has also gained importance in the agribusiness sector. Research has highlighted a growing gap between public perceptions of farming and food production processes and the realities of modern agriculture and the food industry. This can threaten the reputation and legitimacy of companies operating in this sector. One proactive means for companies to meet societal expectations is to make an active (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. The Food Allergy Risk Management in the EU Labelling Legislation.Mainente Federica, Fratea Caterina, Simonato Barbara, Zoccatelli Gianni & Rizzi Corrado - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):275-285.
    Food allergy represents an increasing public health issue, and a large number of food control authorities have provided regulations aimed to minimize the risk of allergic reaction for sensitized consumers. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations together with the World Health Organization established the Codex Alimentarius Commission whose main goal is to protect the consumers’ health. To purse this task the Commission listed the foods and ingredients causing the most severe allergic reactions that should be labelled. It (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  90
    On a Failed Defense of Factory Farming.Stephen Puryear, Stijn Bruers & László Erdős - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):311-323.
    Timothy Hsiao attempts to defend industrial animal farming by arguing that it is not inherently cruel. We raise three main objections to his defense. First, his argument rests on a misunderstanding of the nature of cruelty. Second, his conclusion, though technically true, is so weak as to be of virtually no moral significance or interest. Third, his contention that animals lack moral standing, and thus that mistreating them is wrong only insofar as it makes one more disposed to mistreat other (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  6
    The Issue of No Moral Agency in Climate Change.Theresa Scavenius - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):225-240.
    The dominant methodological assumptions in climate ethical debates are rational-individualistic. The aim of this paper is to examine whether the rational-individualistic methodological framework is compatible with a theory of moral responsibility for climate change. I employ three fitness criteria of moral agency: a normatively significant choice, sufficient knowledge and control. I demonstrate that the rational-individualistic methodology does not provide a framework in which rational agents meet the three criteria. I conclude that rational-individualistic agents are not fit to be held morally (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  1
    Assessing the Influence of Social Responsibility on Reputation: An Empirical Case-Study in Agricultural Cooperatives in Spain.Francisca Castilla-Polo, M. Isabel Sánchez-Hernández & Dolores Gallardo-Vázquez - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):99-120.
    The attention to ethics has gradually become a concurrent topic of modern companies’ management. In the last years Social Responsibility has become a key issue in the strategic agenda of competitive agriculture cooperatives. However, reputation management has not been a visible strength in the cooperative enterprises. First of all, this work theoretically analyzes the relationship between Social Responsibility and reputation in cooperatives. Later, from a practical point of view, we carry on an empirical analysis focused on the olive oil cooperatives (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  3
    Environmental Ethics in Poland.Dzwonkowska Dominika - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):135-151.
    In the 1960s, western societies discovered that unlimited technological progress has a very high price that the environment pays. This was also the beginning of the discussions on the role of ethics in the protection of the environment and the moral aspects of nature exploitation. Even though the state of nature was not better in Poland, it took Polish philosophers a few decades to recognize the moral problem and to address it. The prevailing communistic propaganda of progress had blurred the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  6
    Neither Owners Nor Guardians: In Search of a Morally Appropriate Model for the Keeping of Companion Animals.Kyle Fruh & Wolodymyr Wirchnianski - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):55-66.
    The institution of owning pets has been subjected to compelling criticism on moral grounds. Yet advocates of a reformed, guardian/dependent model may yet face an abolitionist conclusion. We argue that treating companion animals as dependents entails an indefensible moral priority for them in the face of their guardians’ competing moral demands. An abolitionist dilemma arises as a result: if the property and reformed models fail, a morally acceptable characterization of the moral relationship between humans and their companion animals has yet (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  48
    Industrial Farming is Not Cruel to Animals.Timothy Hsiao - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):37-54.
    Critics of industrial animal agriculture have argued that its practices are cruel, inhumane, or otherwise degrading to animals. These arguments sometimes form the basis of a larger case for the complete abolition of animal agriculture, while others argue for more modest welfare-based reforms that allow for certain types of industrial farming. This paper defends industrial farming against the charge of cruelty. As upsetting as certain practices may seem, I argue that they need not be construed as cruel or inhumane. Any (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  16
    Animal Killing and Postdomestic Meat Production.Leroy Frédéric & Praet Istvan - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):67-86.
    The act of animal killing affects the human psyche in manners that are culturally contingent. Throughout history, societal attitudes towards the taking of animal lives have mostly been based on deference and/or dominion. Postdomestic societies have evolved in fundamentally different ways. Meat production is abundant yet concealed, animals are categorized and stereotyped, and slaughter has become a highly disquieting activity. Increased awareness of postdomestic meat production systems raises a moral polemic and provokes disgust in some consumer segments. Overall, a heterogeneous (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  3
    A Theoretical Model of Food Citizenship for the Analysis of Social Praxis.Carmen Lozano-Cabedo & Cristóbal Gómez-Benito - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):1-22.
    Food citizenship is considered a helpful tool for extending the debate about the rights and duties of citizens to the field of food, and for fomenting participation of all actors in the governance of agri-food systems. Despite its generalized use, this concept has still to be systematically defined. The objective of this article is to apply the analytical framework of citizenship to the food dimension in order to identify the features which, from an analytical perspective, characterise food citizenship. By reviewing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  4
    Environmental Ethics and Science: Resilience as a Moral Boundary.Osorio Felipe Bravo - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):121-134.
    Science has always been tightly associated with environmental ethics in a way traditional ethics has not. However, despite this proximity, science has had a merely informational role, where it must inform ethics but not intervene in ethical judgment. Science is seen as an amoral enterprise, requiring an ethics rather than recommending one. In this paper I try to go against this common view. First, I give a critique of the naturalistic fallacy following the lines of Frankena. Then I go on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  3
    Thomas Malthus, Ester Boserup, and Agricultural Development Models in the Age of Limits.Scott Soby - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):87-98.
    Two competing models have served as the basis for agricultural development policies. One is based on observations and assumptions of The Reverend Thomas Malthus in late eighteenth century Britain, and the other from the Danish economist Ester Boserup in the mid-twentieth century. However, rational agricultural development decisions can only be made using a model that incorporates assumptions based on a technically appropriate model that takes into account the currently status of global systems. A new development model may incorporate elements of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  1
    Environmental and Ecological Aspects in the Overall Assessment of Bioeconomy.Székács András - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):153-170.
    Bioeconomy solutions potentially reduce the utilization demand of natural resources, and therefore, represent steps towards circular economy, but are not per se equivalent to sustainability. Thus, production may remain to be achieved against losses in natural resources or at other environmental costs, and materials produced by bioeconomy are not necessarily biodegradable. As a consequence, the assumption that emerging bioeconomy by itself provides an environmentally sustainable economy is not justified, as technologies do not necessarily become sustainable merely through their conversion to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  4
    How Good? Ethical Criteria for a ‘Good Life’ for Farm Animals.James W. Yeates - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):23-35.
    The Farm Animal Welfare Council’s concept of a Good Life gives an idea of an animal’s quality of life that is over and above that of a mere life worth living. The concept needs explanation and clarification, in order to be meaningful, particularly for consumers who purchase farm animal produce. The concept could allow assurance schemes to apply the label to assessments of both the potential of each method of production, conceptualised in ways expected to enhance consumers’ engagement such as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues