Year:

  1.  4
    The Transfer and Delegation of Responsibilities for Genetic Offspring in Gamete Provision.Reuven Brandt - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):665-678.
    In this article I reject the claim that the responsibilities acquired by gamete providers can be transferred to their biological children's intending parents. I defend this position by first showing that arguments in defence of the transferability of responsibilities in gamete provision cases fail to distinguish between the transfer and delegation of responsibility. I then provide an argument against the transferability of responsibilities in gamete provision cases that differs from the ones offered by James Lindemann Nelson and Rivka Weinberg. Though (...)
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  2.  3
    The Transfer and Delegation of Responsibilities for Genetic Offspring in Gamete Provision.Reuven Brandt - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):665-678.
    In this article I reject the claim that the responsibilities acquired by gamete providers can be transferred to their biological children's intending parents. I defend this position by first showing that arguments in defence of the transferability of responsibilities in gamete provision cases fail to distinguish between the transfer and delegation of responsibility. I then provide an argument against the transferability of responsibilities in gamete provision cases that differs from the ones offered by James Lindemann Nelson and Rivka Weinberg. Though (...)
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  3.  5
    Socratic Questioning in Alien Landscapes?Rachel Cooper - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):724-729.
    This commentary considers the role of Socratic questioning in Alien Landscapes? I discuss the three roles that Glover sees Socratic questioning playing in psychiatry: 1. Questioning to clarify problems, 2. Questioning to treat symptoms, 3. Questioning to reconstruct lives. Although I am broadly sympathetic to the idea that philosophical conversations can help us conceptualise, and deal with, mental distress, I raise two concerns. First, is there any way of providing courses of transformative Socratic questioning cheaply? Second, how close is the (...)
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  4.  3
    Planting Some New Thoughts on the Landscape.Shaun Gallagher - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):730-736.
    In this comment on Jonathan Glover's Alien Landscapes? I'll focus on two issues: social cognition in autism, and delusions; and I'll introduce a new topic – solitary confinement – as a supplement to Glover's far-ranging analyses.
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  5.  3
    Response to Alien Landscapes? Commentaries.Jonathan Glover - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):750-756.
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  6.  5
    Morality and Interpretation: Commentary on Jonathan Glover's Alien Landscapes?Jeanette Kennett - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):737-742.
    What is required of the interpreter of disordered minds and what can we learn from the process? Jonathan Glover's book focuses on human interpretation and its role in psychiatry. His hope is that a more careful and sensitive exploration of minds that are very different from our own, will assist us to answer a range of important questions about human agency, identity and responsibility. In this commentary I will focus on the process and purpose of interpretation and expand on some (...)
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  7.  2
    What Is It Like to Be an Alien?Matt Matravers - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):743-749.
    This brief article is concerned with an aspect of Jonathan Glover's book, Alien Landscapes?. After reflecting a little on the book as a whole, the question that is taken up is, ‘Why might a book that seeks to help those without mental disorders understand what they are like “from the inside” be of interest to laymen and practitioners in the criminal law?’. One answer lies in part in the way that ‘what it is like from the inside’ might interact with (...)
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  8.  13
    Autonomy, Vote Buying, and Constraining Options.James Stacey Taylor - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):711-723.
    A common argument used to defend markets in ‘contested commodities’ is based on the value of personal autonomy. Autonomy is of great moral value; removing options from a person's choice set would compromise her ability to exercise her autonomy; hence, there should be a prima facie presumption against removing options from persons’ choice sets; thus, the burden of proof lies with those who wish to prohibit markets in certain goods. Christopher Freiman has developed a version of this argument to defend (...)
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  9.  3
    Critical Philosophy of Race: Beyond the USA.Albert Atkin - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):514-518.
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  10.  16
    Theorising and Exposing Institutional Racism in Britain: The Contribution of Ann and Michael Dummett to Critical Philosophy of Race.Robert Bernasconi - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):593-606.
    By helping to introduce the relatively new concept of institutional racism into Britain, Sir Michael and Ann Dummett expanded the concept of racism beyond the limited sense it had been given in the 1940s and 1950s when racism tended to be associated with the scientific concept of race and when the focus tended to fall on the intent to harm or speak harm of a group that was identified as a race by science. They recognised that ‘race’ was primarily a (...)
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  11.  1
    Theorising and Exposing Institutional Racism in Britain: The Contribution of Ann and Michael Dummett to Critical Philosophy of Race.Robert Bernasconi - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):593-606.
    By helping to introduce the relatively new concept of institutional racism into Britain, Sir Michael and Ann Dummett expanded the concept of racism beyond the limited sense it had been given in the 1940s and 1950s when racism tended to be associated with the scientific concept of race and when the focus tended to fall on the intent to harm or speak harm of a group that was identified as a race by science. They recognised that ‘race’ was primarily a (...)
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  12.  4
    Facsimiles of Flesh.Bob Fischer & Burkay Ozturk - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):489-497.
    Ed Gein was a serial killer, grave robber, and body snatcher who made a lampshade from human skin. Now consider the detective who found that lampshade. Let's suppose that he would never want to own it; however, he does find that he wants a synthetic one just like it – a perfect replica. We assume that there is something morally problematic about the detective having such a replica. We then argue that, given as much, we can reach the surprising conclusion (...)
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  13.  4
    Effective Altruism and its Critics.Iason Gabriel - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):457-473.
    Effective altruism is a philosophy and a social movement that aims to revolutionise the way we do philanthropy. It encourages individuals to do as much good as possible, typically by contributing money to the best-performing aid and development organisations. Surprisingly, this approach has met with considerable resistance among activists and aid providers who argue that effective altruism is insensitive to justice insofar as it overlooks the value of equality, urgency and rights. They also hold that the movement suffers from methodological (...)
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  14.  43
    The Ethics of Germline Gene Editing.Gyngell Christopher, Douglas Thomas & Savulescu Julian - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):498-513.
    Germline Gene Editing has enormous potential both as a research tool and a therapeutic intervention. While other types of gene editing are relatively uncontroversial, GGE has been strongly resisted. In this article, we analyse the ethical arguments for and against pursuing GGE by allowing and funding its development. We argue there is a strong case for pursuing GGE for the prevention of disease. We then examine objections that have been raised against pursuing GGE and argue that these fail. We conclude (...)
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  15.  13
    The Ethics of Germline Gene Editing.Gyngell Christopher, Douglas Thomas & Savulescu Julian - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):498-513.
    Germline Gene Editing has enormous potential both as a research tool and a therapeutic intervention. While other types of gene editing are relatively uncontroversial, GGE has been strongly resisted. In this article, we analyse the ethical arguments for and against pursuing GGE by allowing and funding its development. We argue there is a strong case for pursuing GGE for the prevention of disease. We then examine objections that have been raised against pursuing GGE and argue that these fail. We conclude (...)
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  16.  8
    Black Consciousness as Overcoming Hermeneutical Injustice.George Hull - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):573-592.
    The ideas of the South African Black Consciousness Movement developed as an intellectual response to the situation of black South Africans under apartheid. Though influential, Black Consciousness ideas about how the injustice of apartheid was to be conceptualised, and what form resistance to it consequently needed to take, have always awoken controversy. Here I defend the original Black Consciousness theorists, Bantu Steve Biko and Nyameko Barney Pityana, against charges of racial inherentism, espousing a prescriptive conception of black identity, and racism. (...)
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  17.  3
    Democracy, Epistemology and the Problem of All‐White Juries.Annabelle Lever - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):541-556.
    Does it matter that almost all juries in England and Wales are all-White? Does it matter even if this result is the unintended and undesired result of otherwise acceptable ways of choosing juries? Finally, does it matter that almost all juries are all-White if this has no adverse effect on the treatment of non-White defendants and victims of crime? According to Cheryl Thomas, there is no injustice in a system of jury selection which predictably results in juries with no minority (...)
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  18.  12
    Better to Exploit Than to Neglect? International Clinical Research and the Non‐Worseness Claim.Erik Malmqvist - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):474-488.
    Clinical research is increasingly ‘offshored’ to developing countries, a practice that has generated considerable controversy. It has recently been argued that the prevailing ethical norms governing such research are deeply puzzling. On the one hand, sponsors are not required to offshore trials, even when participants in developing countries would benefit considerably from these trials. On the other hand, if sponsors do offshore, they are required not to exploit participants, even when the latter would benefit from and consent to exploitation. How, (...)
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  19.  31
    On White Ignorance, White Shame, and Other Pitfalls in Critical Philosophy of Race.Marzia Milazzo - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):557-572.
    This article examines Samantha Vice's essay ‘How Do I Live in This Strange Place?’, which sparked a storm of controversy in South Africa, as a starting point for interrogating understandings of whiteness and racism that are dominant in critical philosophy of race. I argue that a significant body of philosophical scholarship on whiteness in general and by white scholars in particular obfuscates the structural dimension of racism. The moralisation of racism that often permeates philosophical scholarship reproduces colourblind logics, which provide (...)
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  20.  5
    On White Ignorance, White Shame, and Other Pitfalls in Critical Philosophy of Race.Marzia Milazzo - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):557-572.
    This article examines Samantha Vice's essay ‘How Do I Live in This Strange Place?’, which sparked a storm of controversy in South Africa, as a starting point for interrogating understandings of whiteness and racism that are dominant in critical philosophy of race. I argue that a significant body of philosophical scholarship on whiteness in general and by white scholars in particular obfuscates the structural dimension of racism. The moralisation of racism that often permeates philosophical scholarship reproduces colourblind logics, which provide (...)
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  21.  1
    Better Dread Than Red: High‐Brown Passing in John Hearne's Voices Under The Window.Charles W. Mills - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (4):519-540.
    In his pioneering Caliban's Reason: Introducing Afro-Caribbean Philosophy, Paget Henry points out that because of the region's colonial history, Caribbean philosophy is far more often found ‘embedded’ in other discourses, such as literature, than in explicit theorising. Following Henry's lead, I seek to find the philosophical ‘moral of the story’ of Voices Under the Window, the 1955 first novel of the late Jamaican writer John Hearne, which some critics regard as his best work. In a novel with significant autobiographical elements, (...)
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  22.  10
    Scepticism About Beneficiary Pays: A Critique.Christian Barry & Robert Kirby - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):282-300.
    Some moral theorists argue that being an innocent beneficiary of significant harms inflicted by others may be sufficient to ground special duties to address the hardships suffered by the victims, at least when it is impossible to extract compensation from those who perpetrated the harm. This idea has been applied to climate change in the form of the beneficiary-pays principle. Other philosophers, however, are quite sceptical about beneficiary pays. Our aim in this article is to examine their critiques. We conclude (...)
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  23.  14
    Is Not Doing the Washing Up Like Draft Dodging? The Military Model for Resisting a Gender Based Labour Division.Bergès Sandrine - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):301-314.
    I will examine a version of Bubeck's and Robeyns' proposals for ‘care duty’ which looks at the ways in which care work is analogous to defence work, and what the implications are for the best models in terms both of distributive justice and serving the common good. My own analysis will differ from Bubeck's and Robeyns' in two respects. First I will apply their arguments to all aspects of care including housework. This will mean making a case for housework counting (...)
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  24.  4
    The New Philosophy of the Criminal Law Chad Flanders & Zachary Hoskins , 2016 New York, Rowman and Littlefield Vi + 276 Pp, £80 £24.95. [REVIEW]William Bülow - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):449-451.
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  25.  6
    Autonomy, Respect, and the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Crisis.Burch Matthew - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):389-402.
    Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities guarantees persons with disabilities ‘the right to legal capacity on an equal basis with others in all aspects of life.’ In its General Comment on Article 12, the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities claims that this guarantee necessitates the abolition of the world's dominant approach to mental capacity law. According to this approach, when a person lacks the mental capacity to make a particular legal (...)
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  26.  2
    One Child: Do We Have a Right to More? Sarah Conly, 2016 New York, Oxford University Press 248 Pp., $26.81. [REVIEW]Jason Chen - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):452-453.
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  27. Justice Across Boundaries: Whose Obligations? Onora O'Neill, 2016 Cambridge Cambridge University Press 249 Pp. £21.99/$32.99. [REVIEW]Sven Gerst - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):454-456.
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  28.  3
    Do Guns Make Us Free? Firmin DeBrabander, 2015 Newhaven, CT Yale University Press, 296 Pp., £20.00. [REVIEW]Adam Organi Henschke - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):446-448.
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  29.  4
    On Regretting Things I Didn't Do and Couldn't Have Done.Jules Holroyd - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):403-413.
    One of the lines of investigation opened up by Wallace in The View from Here concerns the notion of regret: what it is, what it is rationally constrained by, and what are the proper objects of regret. A distinctive feature of Wallace's view is that regret is an intention-like state, which, whilst backward-looking, is bound up with our future directed practices of value. In this commentary, I set out Wallace's claims on regret, its rational constraints, and its objects, and raise (...)
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  30.  12
    Regret and Affirmation.Karen Jones - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):414-419.
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  31.  11
    La Révolution Est Un Bloc? Wallace on Affirmation and Regret.James Lenman - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):420-428.
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  32.  17
    Luck, Justice and Systemic Financial Risk.John Linarelli - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):331-352.
    Systemic financial risk is one of the most significant collective action problems facing societies. The Great Recession brought attention to a tragedy of the commons in capital markets, in which market participants, from the first-time homebuyer to Wall Street financiers, acted in ways beneficial to themselves individually, but which together caused substantial collective harm. Two kinds of risk are at play in complex chains of transactions in financial markets: ordinary market risk and systemic risk. Two moral questions are relevant in (...)
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  33.  32
    Is the Requirement of Sexual Exclusivity Consistent with Romantic Love?Natasha McKeever - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):353-369.
    In some cultures, people tend to believe that it is very important to be sexually exclusive in romantic relationships and idealise monogamous romantic relationships; but there is a tension in this ideal. Sex is generally considered to have value, and usually when we love someone we want to increase the amount of value in their lives, not restrict it without good reason. There is thus a call, not yet adequately responded to by philosophers, for greater clarity in the reasons §why (...)
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  34.  11
    Liability to Deception and Manipulation: The Ethics of Undercover Policing.Christopher Nathan - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):370-388.
    Does undercover police work inevitably wrong its targets? Or are undercover activities justified by a general security benefit? In this article I argue that people can make themselves liable to deception and manipulation. The debate on undercover policing will proceed more fruitfully if the tactic can be conceptualised along those lines, rather than as essentially ‘dirty hands’ activity, in which people are wronged in pursuit of a necessary good, or in instrumentalist terms, according to which the harms of undercover work (...)
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  35.  5
    Customary Trade and the Complications of Consent.Shmuel Nili - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):315-330.
    Global justice theorists have given much attention to corporations' purchases of state-owned natural resources controlled by dictators. These resources, the common argument goes, belong to the people rather than to those who exercise effective political power. Dictators who rely on violence to secure their political power and who sell state-owned natural resources without authorisation from their people, or from their people's elected delegates, are therefore violating their peoples' property rights. But many dictatorships also distribute natural resource revenue to the population, (...)
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  36. Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo , 2015 Oxford, Oxford University Press, Xiii 720 Pp., £39.99. [REVIEW]Laura Valentini - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):443-445.
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  37.  6
    Replies.Wallace R. Jay - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):429-442.
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  38.  2
    Toxic Funding? Conflicts of Interest and Their Epistemological Significance.Ben Almassi - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):206-220.
    Conflict of interest disclosure has become a routine requirement in communication of scientific information. Its advocates defend COI disclosure as a sensible middle path between the extremes of categorical prohibition on for-profit research and anything-goes acceptance of research regardless of origin. To the extent that COI information is meant to aid reviewer and reader evaluation of research, COIs must be epistemologically significant. While some commentators treat COIs as always relevant to research credibility, others liken the demand for disclosure to an (...)
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  39. Connecting Applied and Theoretical Bayesian Epistemology: Data Relevance, Pragmatics, and the Legal Case of Sally Clark.J. Barker Matthew - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):242-262.
    In this article applied and theoretical epistemologies benefit each other in a study of the British legal case of R. vs. Clark. Clark's first infant died at 11 weeks of age, in December 1996. About a year later, Clark had a second child. After that child died at eight weeks of age, Clark was tried for murdering both infants. Statisticians and philosophers have disputed how to apply Bayesian analyses to this case, and thereby arrived at different judgments about it. By (...)
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  40.  14
    Introduction to Special Issue on Applied Epistemology.David Coady & Miranda Fricker - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):153-156.
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  41.  4
    Forgetting in Immortality.Ryan Marshall Felder - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2).
    In the philosophical debate about the desirability of immortality it is argued that immortality could never be desirable, since it requires us to either take on a life where none of our projects or interests stimulate us anymore, or else to loosen our connections to our past selves and no longer survive. I argue that both concerns can be met by considering the role that partial forgetting of past experiences would play in the immortal life. One who loses some non-essential (...)
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  42.  43
    In Defence of Reasonable Doubt.Georgi Gardiner - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):221-241.
    In criminal trials the state must establish, to a particular standard of proof, the defendant's guilt. The most widely used and important standard of proof for criminal conviction is the ‘beyond a reasonable doubt' standard. But what legitimates this standard, rather than an alternative? One view holds the standard of proof should be determined or justified – at least in large part – by its consequences. In this spirit, Laudan uses crime statistics to estimate risks the average citizen runs of (...)
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  43.  32
    Rape Myths and Domestic Abuse Myths as Hermeneutical Injustices.Katharine Jenkins - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):191-205.
    This article argues that rape myths and domestic abuse myths constitute hermeneutical injustices. Drawing on empirical research, I show that the prevalence of these myths makes victims of rape and of domestic abuse less likely to apply those terms to their experiences. Using Sally Haslanger's distinction between manifest and operative concepts, I argue that in these cases, myths mean that victims hold a problematic operative concept, or working understanding, which prevents them from identifying their experience as one of rape or (...)
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  44.  6
    From Social Values to P-Values: The Social Epistemology of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.Stephen John - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):157-171.
    In this article I ask two questions prompted by the phenomenon of ‘politically patterned’ climate change denial. First, can an individual's political commitments provide her with good reasons not to defer to cognitive experts’ testimony? Building on work in philosophy of science on inductive risk, I argue they can. Second, can an individual's political commitments provide her with good reasons not to defer to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's testimony? I argue that they cannot, because of the high epistemic (...)
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  45.  6
    Fiduciary Duties and Moral Blackmail.Simon Keller - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2).
    In meeting legal or professional fiduciary obligations, a fiduciary can sometimes come to share a special moral relationship with her beneficiary. Special moral relationships produce special moral obligations. Sometimes the obligations faced by a fiduciary as a result of her moral relationship with her beneficiary go beyond the obligations involved in the initial fiduciary relationship. How such moral obligations develop is sometimes under the control of the beneficiary, or of an outside party. As a result, the fiduciary can be the (...)
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  46.  30
    Epistemic Injustice and Illness.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2).
    This article analyses the phenomenon of epistemic injustice within contemporary healthcare. We begin by detailing the persistent complaints patients make about their testimonial frustration and hermeneutical marginalization, and the negative impact this has on their care. We offer an epistemic analysis of this problem using Miranda Fricker's account of epistemic injustice. We detail two types of epistemic injustice, testimonial and hermeneutical, and identify the negative stereotypes and structural features of modern healthcare practices that generate them. We claim that these stereotypes (...)
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  47.  4
    Epistemic Injustice and Illness.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):172-190.
    This article analyses the phenomenon of epistemic injustice within contemporary healthcare. We begin by detailing the persistent complaints patients make about their testimonial frustration and hermeneutical marginalization, and the negative impact this has on their care. We offer an epistemic analysis of this problem using Miranda Fricker's account of epistemic injustice. We detail two types of epistemic injustice, testimonial and hermeneutical, and identify the negative stereotypes and structural features of modern healthcare practices that generate them. We claim that these stereotypes (...)
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  48.  30
    Answering to Future People: Responsibility for Climate Change in a Breaking World.Tim Mulgan - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2).
    Our everyday notions of responsibility are often driven by our need to justify ourselves to specific others – especially those we harm, wrong, or otherwise affect. One challenge for contemporary ethics is to extend this interpersonal urgency to our relations with those future people who are harmed or affected by our actions. In this article, I explore our responsibility for climate change by imagining a possible ‘broken future’, damaged by the carbon emissions of previous generations, and then asking what its (...)
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  49.  13
    Pessimism About Motivating Modal Personism.Adam James Roberts - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2).
    In ‘What's Wrong with Speciesism?’, Shelly Kagan sketches an account on which both actually being a person and possibly being a person are relevant to one's moral status, labelling this view ‘modal personism’ and supporting its conclusions with appeals to intuitions about a range of marginal cases. I tender a pessimistic response to Kagan's concern about motivating modal personism: that is, of being able to ‘go beyond the mere appeal to brute intuition, eventually offering an account of why modal personhood (...)
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  50.  6
    Justice, Injustice, and Critical Potential Beyond Borders: A Multi‐Dimensional Affair.Miriam Ronzoni - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2).
    Until fairly recently, positions within the global justice debate have been quite polarised along the statism/cosmopolitanism dichotomy. Recently, the dichotomy has been challenged, but the idea that the proximity of a view to cosmopolitanism also tracks its critical potential in political terms has not. This article rejects this premise. In order to do so, it also provides a novel, more systematic challenge to the statism/cosmopolitanism dichotomy. The main suggestion is that we should consider two aspects simultaneously, and identify positions within (...)
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  51.  8
    Overall Lifelong Fortune: A Critique of the Intrinsic Potential Account.Doran Smolkin - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2).
    It seems clear that a fortunate life for a human being is very different from a fortunate life for a dog. But it is not clear what the appropriate measure is for determining whether a life is fortunate or not. Jeff McMahan rejects the Species Norm Account and defends the Intrinsic Potential Account of overall lifelong fortune. In this article, I argue that the Intrinsic Potential Account fails. More specifically, I will argue that it is vulnerable to numerous counterexamples; fails (...)
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  52.  18
    Doing and Allowing Harm. Fiona Woollard, 2015 Oxford, Oxford University Press 239 Pp., £40.00. [REVIEW]Fei Song - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2).
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  53. Doing and Allowing Harm. FionaWoollard, 2015 Oxford, Oxford University Press 239 Pp., £40.00. [REVIEW]Fei Song - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):278-280.
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  54. Remorse, Penal Theory and Sentencing Hannah Maslen, 2015 Oxford and Portland, OR, Hart Publishing Xvi 212 Pp. £40.00. [REVIEW]Steven Tudor - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):281-283.
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  55.  20
    Expert Testimony, Law and Epistemic Authority.Tony Ward - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2).
    This article discusses the concept of epistemic authority in the context of English law relating to expert testimony. It distinguishes between two conceptions of epistemic authority, one strong and one weak, and argues that only the weak conception is appropriate in a legal context, or in any other setting where reliance on experts can be publicly justified. It critically examines Linda Zagzebski's defence of a stronger conception of epistemic authority and questions whether epistemic authority is as closely analogous to practical (...)
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  56.  1
    Expert Testimony, Law and Epistemic Authority.Tony Ward - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):263-277.
    This article discusses the concept of epistemic authority in the context of English law relating to expert testimony. It distinguishes between two conceptions of epistemic authority, one strong and one weak, and argues that only the weak conception is appropriate in a legal context, or in any other setting where reliance on experts can be publicly justified. It critically examines Linda Zagzebski's defence of a stronger conception of epistemic authority and questions whether epistemic authority is as closely analogous to practical (...)
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  57.  16
    Good Work.Samuel Clark - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1).
    Work is on one side a central arena of self-making, self-understanding, and self-development, and on the other a deep threat to our flourishing. My question is: what kind of work is good for human beings, and what kind bad? I first characterise work as necessary productive activity. My answer to my question then develops a perfectionist account of the human good: the good is the full development and expression of human potentials and capacities; this development and expression happens over a (...)
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  58.  5
    Good Work.Samuel Clark - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):61-73.
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  59.  15
    Hobbesian Right to Healthcare.Shane D. Courtland - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1).
    Over the last few years we have had a debate regarding the role of government in providing healthcare. There has been a question as to whether or not the state's proper role requires protection of its subjects from the calamities associated with a lack of healthcare. In this article, I will argue that straightforward Hobbesian principles require the state to provide healthcare. It might seem odd that such a positive right can be justified by a philosopher who famously conceives of (...)
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  60.  4
    Hobbesian Right to Healthcare.Shane D. Courtland - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):99-113.
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  61.  6
    Autonomy's Substance.Fabian Freyenhagen - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):114-129.
    © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Applied Philosophy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Philosophy. In this article, I argue that autonomy has to be conceived substantively in order to serve as the qualifying condition for receiving the full set of individual liberal rights. I show that the common distinction between content-neutral and substantive accounts of autonomy is riddled with confusion and ambiguities, and provide a clear alternative taxonomy. At least insofar as we (...)
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  62.  3
    Democratic Legitimacy and the Paradox of Persisting Opposition.González-Ricoy Iñigo - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):130-146.
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  63.  6
    Democratic Legitimacy and the Paradox of Persisting Opposition.Iñigo González‐Ricoy - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):130-146.
    The paradox of persisting opposition raises a puzzle for normative accounts of democratic legitimacy. It involves an outvoted democrat who opposes a given policy while supporting it. The article makes a threefold contribution to the existing literature. First, it considers pure proceduralist and pure instrumentalist alternatives to solve the paradox and finds them wanting — on normative, conceptual, and empirical grounds. Second, it presents a solution based on a two-level distinction between substantive and procedural legitimacy that shows that citizens are (...)
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  64.  12
    How Propaganda Works Jason Stanley, 2015 Princeton, Princeton University Press XX + 353 Pp, £11.97. [REVIEW]Andrew M. I. Knox - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1).
  65.  1
    How Propaganda Works Jason Stanley, 2015 Princeton, Princeton University Press XX + 353 Pp, £11.97. [REVIEW]Andrew M. I. Knox - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):149-151.
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  66.  13
    Response: Limiting Defensive Rights.Seth Lazar - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):19-23.
    Arthur Ripstein’s article draws on more resources than I can deploy in this response to it. I will restate what I take to be the central claims of the article, then present a reply. Ripstein does not strictly argue for his view of proportionality in defensive force. Instead he paints a picture of a moral system that one might adopt, and indicates the role of the proportionality constraint therein. So after outlining how I understand that picture, I will draw an (...)
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  67.  9
    Is Corporal Punishment Torturous?Patrick Lenta - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1).
    The aim of this article is to determine whether fixed courses of judicial corporal punishment and non-abusive corporal punishment of children amount to torture. I assess the reasons that have been offered for distinguishing fixed courses of JCP from torture and argue that none is successful. I argue that non-consensual JCP that inflicts severe pain is appropriately classifiable as torture, but that JCP that inflicts mild pain and entirely consensual JCP are not torturous. I consider whether any of the reasons (...)
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  68.  1
    Is Corporal Punishment Torturous?Patrick Lenta - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):74-88.
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  69.  2
    Reclaiming Proportionality: A Reply to Arthur Ripstein.George Letsas - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):24-31.
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  70.  1
    Striking Beauty: A Philosophical Look at the Asian Martial Arts B. Allen, 2015 New York, Columbia University Press Xiii + 252 Pp., $30. [REVIEW]Ok Gwang - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):147-148.
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  71.  6
    A Comment on Ripstein's Reclamation.Jonathan Quong - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):32-37.
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  72.  9
    Reclaiming Proportionality.Arthur Ripstein - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):1-18.
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  73.  33
    Equality as Comparative Fairness.Larry Temkin - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):43-60.
    The goal of this article is modest. It is simply to help illuminate the nature of egalitarianism. More particularly, I aim to show what certain egalitarians are committed to, and to suggest that equality, as these egalitarians understand it, is an important normative ideal that cannot simply be ignored in moral deliberations. In doing this, I distinguish between equality as universality, equality as impartiality, and equality as comparability, and also between instrumental and non-instrumental egalitarianism. I then characterise the version of (...)
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  74.  5
    Equality as Comparative Fairness.Larry Temkin - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):43-60.
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  75.  6
    Remedial Responsibility for Severe Poverty: Justice or Humanity?Jesse Tomalty - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1).
    Remedial responsibility is the prospective responsibility to assist those in great need. With tens of millions of people worldwide suffering from severe poverty, questions about the attribution of remedial responsibility and the nature of the relevant duties of assistance are among the most pressing of our time. This article concerns the question of whether remedial responsibility for severe poverty is a matter of justice or of humanity. I discuss three kinds of situation in which an agent owes remedial responsibility to (...)
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  76.  4
    Remedial Responsibility for Severe Poverty: Justice or Humanity?Jesse Tomalty - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):89-98.
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  77.  4
    The Proportionality Constraint.Suzanne Uniacke - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):38-42.
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  78.  4
    Parental Education and Expensive Consumption Habits.Danielle Zwarthoed - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy (2).
    The aim of this article is to investigate the general and special obligations of parents with respect to the shaping of consumption habits, from a liberal egalitarian perspective. The article argues that, in virtue of them being well placed to shape the next generation's consumption habits, parents have a duty of justice to prevent their children from developing expensive consumption habits in order to enable them to leave their fair share to others. In virtue of the special relationship they have (...)
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  79.  42
    Divide and Rule Better: On Subsidiarity, Legitimacy and the Epistemic Aim of Political Decision‐Making.Yann Allard‐Tremblay - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    How should a political society be structured so as to legitimately distribute political power? One principle advanced to answer this question is the principle of subsidiarity. According to this principle, the default locus of political power is with the lowest competent political unit. This article argues that subsidiarity is a structural principle of a conception of political legitimacy informed by epistemic considerations. Broadly, the argument is that political societies organised according to the principle of subsidiarity can more effectively achieve political (...)
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  80.  26
    Prospects for an Inclusive Theory of Justice: The Case of Non‐Human Animals.Brian Berkey - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy:679-695.
    In this article, I argue that there are three widely accepted views within contemporary theorising about justice that present barriers to accepting that non-human animals possess direct entitlements of justice. These views are that the basis of entitlements of justice is either contribution to a cooperative scheme for mutual advantage or the capacity to so contribute; political liberalism, that is, the view that requirements for coercive state action can be justified only by appeal to the ideal of citizens as free (...)
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  81.  2
    Personal Sovereignty and Our Moral Rights to Non‐Interference.Susanne Burri - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy:621-634.
    In this article, I defend the inviolability approach to solving the paradox of deontology against a criticism raised by Michael Otsuka. The paradox of deontology revolves around the question whether it should always be permissible to infringe someone's right to non-interference when this would serve to minimize the overall number of comparable rights infringements that occur. According to the inviolability approach, rights to non-interference protect and give expression to our personal sovereignty, which is not advanced through the minimization of rights (...)
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  82.  6
    Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules That Run the World, Leif Wenar, 2016 Oxford & New York, Oxford University Press Liii + 494 Pp., £22.99. [REVIEW]Billy Christmas - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
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  83.  6
    Ageing and Terminal Illness: Problems for Rawlsian Justice.Ben Davies - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    This article considers attempts to include the issues of ageing and ill health in a Rawlsian framework. It first considers Norman Daniels’ Prudential Lifespan Account, which reduces intergenerational questions to issues of intrapersonal prudence from behind a Rawslian veil of ignorance. This approach faces several problems of idealisation, including those raised by Hugh Lazenby, because it must assume that everyone will live to the same age, undermining its status as a prudential calculation. I then assess Lazenby's account, which applies Rawls’ (...)
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  84.  4
    Dignity, Disability, and Lifespan.Samuel J. Kerstein - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    In the Paraplegia Case, we must choose either to preserve the life of a paraplegic for 10 years or that of someone in full health for the same duration. Non-consequentialists reject a benefit-maximising view, which holds that since the person in full health will have a higher quality of life, we ought to save him straightaway. In the Unequal Lifespan Case, we face a choice between saving one person for 5 years in full health and another for 25 years in (...)
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  85.  14
    What the Old Right of Necessity Can Do for the Contemporary Global Poor.Alejandra Mancilla - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy:607-620.
    Given the grim global statistics of extreme poverty and socioeconomic inequalities, moral and political philosophers have focused on the duties of justice and assistance that arise therefrom. What the needy are morally permitted to do for themselves in this context has been, however, a mostly overlooked question. Reviving a medieval and early modern account of the right of necessity, I propose that a chronically deprived agent has a right to take, use and/or occupy whatever material resources are required to guarantee (...)
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  86.  9
    Visiting the Ruins of Detroit: Exploitation or Cultural Tourism?Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    Are Detroit ruin tours a form of morally permissible cultural tourism, or do these tours amount to a form of exploitation? To answer this question I compare Detroit ruin tours with ‘slum tours’ – guided tours of slums in the world's major cities. I argue that exploitation of the sort we find in slum tourism also exists, to a lesser extent, in Detroit ruin tours. To show this I detail two different accounts of exploitation and argue that Ruth Sample's account (...)
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  87.  7
    Criminalising Unknowing Defence.Suzanne Uniacke - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy:651-664.
    Should a legal plea of self- or third-party defence include an ‘awareness component’ that requires that the actor was aware of the justificatory facts at the time of action? Some theorists argue that in cases of so-called unknowing defence, where an actor in fact averts an otherwise unavoidable danger to himself or another person although unaware at the time of action that this is what he is doing, the objective facts alone should allow a plea of self- or third-party defence. (...)
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