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  1. Productive Justice in the ‘Post‐Work Future’.Caleb Althorpe & Elizabeth Finneron-Burns - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):330-349.
    Justice in production is concerned with ensuring the benefits and burdens of work are distributed in a way that is reflective of persons' status as moral equals. While a variety of accounts of productive justice have been offered, insufficient attention has been paid to the distribution of work's benefits and burdens in the future. In this article, after granting for the sake of argument forecasts of widespread future technological unemployment, we consider the implications this has for egalitarian requirements of productive (...)
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  2.  51
    Labour Justice in the Platform Economy.Friedemann Bieber - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):235-250.
    Recent years have witnessed the rise of digital platforms that allow economic agents to arrange ever more fine-grained contracts. This article zooms in on labour-based platforms that permit the hire of labour in a just-in-time fashion (and are part of the broader trend towards on-demand work). Its principal contribution comes in three parts. First, exposing the frequently overlooked diversity of labour-based platforms, the article proposes to distinguish platform companies, which directly sell services and then purchase the labour needed to provide (...)
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  3.  64
    The Difficulty of Making Good Work Available to All.Pascal Brixel - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):267-288.
    How might good work – skilled, autonomous work which affords workers opportunities for meaningful social cooperation in decent conditions – be made available to all? I evaluate five commonly advanced strategies: an unregulated labor market, egalitarian redistribution of resources, state regulation, collective bargaining, and workplace democracy. Each, I argue, has significant limitations. An unregulated labor market ignores workers' unduly weak bargaining power vis-à-vis employers. Egalitarian redistribution alone fails to solve this problem due to distinctive and endemic imperfections of labor markets. (...)
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  4.  14
    The Future of the Philosophy of Work.Markus Furendal, Huub Brouwer & Willem van der Deijl - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):181-201.
    Work has always been a significant source of ethical questions, philosophical reflection, and political struggle. Although the future of work in a sense is always at stake, the issue is particularly relevant right now, in light of the advent of advanced AI systems and the collective experience of the COVID-19 pandemic. This has reinvigorated philosophical discussion and interest in the study of the future of work. The purpose of this survey article is to provide an overview of the emerging philosophical (...)
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  5.  33
    Work, Justice, and Collective Capital Institutions: Revisiting Rudolf Meidner and the Case for Wage‐Earner Funds.Markus Furendal & Martin O'Neill - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):306-329.
    This article makes the case for a specific variety of what we call Collective Capital Institutions (CCIs), by returning to the idea of Wage-Earner Funds (WEFs) – a 1970s Swedish policy proposal designed gradually to shift ownership and control over parts of the economy to democratically controlled institutions. We identify two attractive rationales in favour of such a scheme and argue that both can fruitfully be transposed to the current worldwide economic situation. The egalitarian rationale is that WEFs could help (...)
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  6.  13
    When Is Work Unjust? Confronting the Choice between ‘Pluralistic’ and ‘Unifying’ Approaches.Sarah C. Goff - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):218-234.
    Individuals have different experiences of work when they are self-employed, when they perform tasks in the gig economy, and when they follow directives from managers. But such differences are not represented in some of the most prominent non-ideal theories of work. These describe workers as a coherent group, with a position in the structure of the liberal capitalist economy. I present an alternative that does better at acknowledging difference, through a description of work and workers that has greater ‘pluralism’ and (...)
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  7.  17
    On Taking Offence. Emily McTernan, 2023. New York, Oxford University Press. ix + 193 pp, £71.00 (hb) £22.99 (pb). [REVIEW]Simeon Goldstraw - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):383-385.
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  8.  5
    Why a UBI Will Never Be High Enough.Joseph Heath - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):289-305.
    Schemes to replace traditional welfare programmes with a universal basic income (UBI) are sometimes presented as a way to reduce overall economic inequality. But because they lower the implicit marginal taxation rate of individuals entering the workforce, they have the effect of increasing economic inequality between those who opt out of the workforce and those who choose to participate. This article examines the effect that an increase in this income gap can be expected to have on the perceived adequacy of (...)
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  9.  60
    Why a UBI Will Never Be High Enough.Joseph Heath - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):289-305.
    Schemes to replace traditional welfare programmes with a universal basic income (UBI) are sometimes presented as a way to reduce overall economic inequality. But because they lower the implicit marginal taxation rate of individuals entering the workforce, they have the effect of increasing economic inequality between those who opt out of the workforce and those who choose to participate. This article examines the effect that an increase in this income gap can be expected to have on the perceived adequacy of (...)
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  10.  10
    Why a UBI Will Never Be High Enough.Joseph Heath - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):289-305.
    Schemes to replace traditional welfare programmes with a universal basic income (UBI) are sometimes presented as a way to reduce overall economic inequality. But because they lower the implicit marginal taxation rate of individuals entering the workforce, they have the effect of increasing economic inequality between those who opt out of the workforce and those who choose to participate. This article examines the effect that an increase in this income gap can be expected to have on the perceived adequacy of (...)
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  11.  15
    Work Emails at the Breakfast Table: Proximity of Labour and Capital as an Unexamined Difficulty for the (Just) Distribution of Discretionary Time.Alastair James - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):350-365.
    This article examines an omission in the study of discretionary time that bears on proposals currently being evaluated in this part of political philosophy. Specifically, this is the tendency in many jobs for work time to bleed into what is meant to be protected or discretionary time. I refer to this phenomenon as the relative proximity of labour and capital, which has become more prevalent in the labour market due to increased use of mobile communications technology. Ignored by the literature (...)
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  12.  5
    The Welfare Argument for Free Time Protection.Malte Jauch - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):366-382.
    Demands for free time protections are often justified with appeal to a concern for individuals' welfare. The idea is that people would enjoy greater levels of welfare if they had more access to free time. This article shows that the currently most sophisticated version of the welfare argument is inconclusive. It then shows how this argument can be modified and extended to become conclusive. The main claim is that policymakers have a decisive welfare-based reason to implement free time protections that (...)
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  13.  9
    Hijacked: How Neoliberalism Turned the Work Ethic against Workers and How Workers Can Take It Back. E. Anderson, 2023. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. xviii + 370 pp, £25 (hb). [REVIEW]Miloš Kovačević - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):386-387.
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  14.  9
    Conservatism: The Fight for a Tradition. Edmund Fawcett, 2020. Princeton, Princeton University Press. 525 + xiii pp, £30 (hb) £18.99 (pb). [REVIEW]Richard Mullender - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):388-390.
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  15.  19
    In Cash We Trust?Tom Parr - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):251-266.
    Many individuals have miserable work lives, in which they must toil away at mind-numbing yet exhausting tasks for hours on end, being ordered about by their superiors, perhaps with few guarantees that this source of income will persist for very long. However, this is only half of the story: what is centrally important is that many of those who endure these conditions are denied a fair wage in return for the burdens that they bear. In this article, I reflect on (...)
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  16.  49
    In Cash We Trust?Tom Parr - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):251-266.
    Many individuals have miserable work lives, in which they must toil away at mind-numbing yet exhausting tasks for hours on end, being ordered about by their superiors, perhaps with few guarantees that this source of income will persist for very long. However, this is only half of the story: what is centrally important is that many of those who endure these conditions are denied a fair wage in return for the burdens that they bear. In this article, I reflect on (...)
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  17.  18
    In Cash We Trust?Tom Parr - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):251-266.
    Many individuals have miserable work lives, in which they must toil away at mind-numbing yet exhausting tasks for hours on end, being ordered about by their superiors, perhaps with few guarantees that this source of income will persist for very long. However, this is only half of the story: what is centrally important is that many of those who endure these conditions are denied a fair wage in return for the burdens that they bear. In this article, I reflect on (...)
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  18.  25
    Two Concepts of Meaningful Work.Willem van der Deijl - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):202-217.
    The concept of meaningful work is used to evaluate the quality of work. Typical cases of meaningless work that have been used to clarify this concept are assembly line work, and work involving other types of mindless tasks, but also David Graeber's ‘bullshit jobs’. I argue that there are at least two fundamental reasons to care about meaningful work: reasons from the wellbeing of the worker and reasons pertaining to meaningfulness of the worker's life. I first argue that a concept (...)
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  19.  48
    Planning and Its Function in Our Lives.Michael E. Bratman - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):1-15.
    Our capacity for planning agency is a core capacity that underlies interrelated forms of mind-shaped practical organization: cross-temporal organization of individual agency, shared agency, social rules, and rule-guided organized institutions. A function of our capacity for planning agency is the support of these forms of practical organization. I highlight Peter Godfrey-Smith's contrast between the ‘Wright function’ of something as ‘the effect it has which explains why it is there’ and ‘Cummins functions’ that ‘are capacities or effects of components of systems, (...)
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  20.  18
    Justice for Animals: Our Collective Responsibility. Martha Nussbaum, 2023. New York, Simon & Schuster. 400 pp, $28.99 (hb). [REVIEW]B. V. E. Hyde - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):172-173.
  21.  18
    The Present Functions and the Future Persistence of Planning Agency.Luca Ferrero - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):30-40.
    Following Bratman, I distinguish between the Cummins or component-function of the planning capacity (its role as a component of larger forms of practical organizations) and its Wright or existence-function – the planning capacity's effect that explains its existence. I agree with Bratman that these functions are distinct. The planning capacity's role within larger practical organizations need not explain its origin. But I argue that the distinction is less stark for future-oriented existence-functions, which concern the future persistence and stability of the (...)
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  22.  53
    A Dissolution of the Repugnant Conclusion.Roberto Fumagalli - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):85-105.
    This article articulates and defends a dissolution of the so-called repugnant conclusion, which focuses on the notion of life worth living figuring both in Parfit's formulation of the repugnant conclusion and in most responses to such a conclusion. The proposed dissolution demonstrates that the notion of life worth living is plagued by multiple ambiguities and that these ambiguities, in turn, hamper meaningful debate about both the issue of whether the repugnant conclusion can be avoided and the issue of whether the (...)
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  23. Edibility and In Vitro Meat: Ethical Considerations; By Rachel Robison‐Greene. [REVIEW]Kyle Johannsen - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):170-171.
  24.  22
    Why Refugees Should Be Enfranchised.Zsolt Kapelner - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):106-121.
    Many authors argue that refugees should be enfranchised independently of citizenship. The enfranchisement of refugees is often seen as crucial for affirming their agency in the politics of asylum. However, most arguments in the literature do not explain why precisely it matters that they exercise their agency in the realm of democratic decision-making, i.e. why it matters that refugees participate in collectively wielding the public power to which they are subjected, rather than passively enjoy protection against the excessive and intrusive (...)
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  25.  46
    Inequality in Planning Capacity.Jennifer M. Morton - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):56-65.
    Planning allows us to coordinate our actions over time, and the ability to plan is crucial in many areas of our lives. I argue that while planning is deeply embedded in contemporary societies, not all individuals have equal access to the structures that support such planning. This article explores how external planning-support structures are essential to our capacity to plan and how inequality in access to these structures can impact an individual's ability to deliberate and pursue long-term plans. I conclude (...)
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  26.  19
    The Tyranny of Political Correctness? A Game‐Theoretic Model of Social Norms and Implicit Bias.Katharina Berndt Rasmussen & Nicolas Olsson Yaouzis - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):122-144.
    This article sets out to describe and solve two puzzles that emerge in segregated labour markets (e.g. the USA or Sweden). First, in many hiring contexts people profess to adhere to egalitarian norms, and specifically to a qualification norm according to which job qualification should be the basis of employment. Still there is evidence of frequent norm violations (discrimination). Surprisingly, the norm persists and people do not frequently protest against such norm violations. The second puzzle is that people are suspicious (...)
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  27.  21
    Ubuntu Thinking on Biodiversity Loss: The Inadequacies of Egalitarian and Communitarian Solutions.Olusegun Steven Samuel & Rotimi Omosulu - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):145-169.
    This article evaluates the moral implications of two leading theories on biodiversity preservation/conservation (Paul Taylor's biocentric egalitarianism and J. Baird Callicott's holistic communitarianism). Taylor argues for the moral equality of all members of the Earth's community of life, calling for an ethic of respect for nature to conserve biodiversity. Callicott argues for the moral consideration of ecosystems to maintain their integrity, stability, and beauty. The article makes two major claims. First, we need a plausible account of moral egalitarianism to disrupt (...)
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  28. Forgiveness: Overcoming versus Forswearing Blame.Julius Schönherr - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):66-84.
    Philosophers often identify forgiveness with either overcoming or forswearing blaming attitudes such as, paradigmatically, resentment for the right reasons; yet there is little debate as to which of the two (if either) is correct. In this article, I present three arguments that aim to strengthen the forswearing view. First, on the overcoming view, many paradigm cases of forgiveness would turn out to be mere ‘letting go’ instead. Second, only the forswearing view plausibly allows for forgiveness in cases where the victim (...)
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  29.  43
    Functionalisms and the Philosophy of Action.Manuel Vargas - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):41-55.
    Focusing on the recent work of Michael Bratman as emblematic of several important developments in the philosophy of action, I raise four questions that engage with a set of interlocking concerns about systemic functionalism in the philosophy of action. These questions are: (i) Are individual and institutional intentions the same kind of thing? (ii) Can the risk of proliferation of systemic functional explanations be managed? (iii) Is there an appealing basis for the apparent methodological individualism in our theories of action (...)
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  30.  20
    How Does Human Agency Actually Work? On Bratman's ‘Core Capacity Thesis’ and the Relation between Philosophy of Action and the Empirical Sciences.Jonathan Phillips & David Plunkett - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy (1):16-29.
    Throughout his career, Michael Bratman has developed a detailed model of individual ‘planning agency’, and, more recently, models of joint action and aspects of social life that he argues such planning agency helps support. How might we empirically investigate whether these models capture what is going on in actual human lives? In this article, we critically engage with this broad question by focusing on what Bratman calls the ‘core capacity thesis’, which is at the center of his most recent discussions (...)
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