Year:

  1. A 450 Year Old Turkish Poem, Art as a Qualitative Investigation Tool, Buddhist Deathways, Karma and Eudaimonia in Death and Organ Donation: The Wonders of Truly Diverse Bioethical Inquiry!Michael A. Ashby - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):315-318.
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  2.  3
    Measles Vaccination is Best for Children: The Argument for Relying on Herd Immunity Fails.Bester Johan Christiaan - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):375-384.
    This article examines an argument which may negatively influence measles vaccination uptake. According to the argument, an individual child in a highly vaccinated society may be better off by being non-vaccinated; the child does not risk vaccine adverse effects and is protected against measles through herd immunity. Firstly, the conclusion of the argument is challenged by showing that herd immunity’s protection is unreliable and inferior to vaccination. Secondly, the logic of the argument is challenged by showing that the argument is (...)
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  3. Access to High Cost Cancer Medicines Through the Lens of an Australian Senate Inquiry—Defining the “Goods” at Stake.Narcyz Ghinea, Miles Little & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):401-410.
    Cancer is a major burden on populations and health systems internationally. The development of innovative cancer medicines is seen as a significant part of the solution. These new cancer medicines are, however, expensive, leading to limited or delayed access and disagreements among stakeholders about which medicines to fund. There is no obvious resolution to these disagreements, with stakeholders holding firmly to divergent positions. Access to cancer medicines was recently explored in Australia in a Senate Inquiry into the Availability of New, (...)
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  4.  3
    A Feminist Critique of Justifications for Sex Selection.Tereza Hendl - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):427-438.
    This paper examines dominant arguments advocating for the procreative right to undergo sex selection for social reasons, based on gender preference. I present four of the most recognized and common justifications for sex selection: the argument from natural sex selection, the argument from procreative autonomy, the argument from family balancing, and the argument from children’s well-being. Together these represent the various means by which scholars aim to defend access to sex selection for social reasons as a legitimate procreative choice. In (...)
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  5.  2
    Decision-Making Capacity and Unusual Beliefs: Two Contentious Cases.Brent Hyslop - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):439-444.
    Decision-making capacity is a vital concept in law, ethics, and clinical practice. Two legal cases where capacity literally had life and death significance are NHS Trust v Ms T [2004] and Kings College Hospital v C [2015]. These cases share another feature: unusual beliefs. This essay will critically assess the concept of capacity, particularly in relation to the unusual beliefs in these cases. Firstly, the interface between capacity and unusual beliefs will be examined. This will show that the “using and (...)
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  6. Exploring Vaccine Hesitancy Through an Artist–Scientist Collaboration.Kaisu Koski & Johan Holst - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):411-426.
    This project explores vaccine hesitancy through an artist–scientist collaboration. It aims to create better understanding of vaccine hesitant parents’ health beliefs and how these influence their vaccine-critical decisions. The project interviews vaccine-hesitant parents in the Netherlands and Finland and develops experimental visual-narrative means to analyse the interview data. Vaccine-hesitant parents’ health beliefs are, in this study, expressed through stories, and they are paralleled with so-called illness narratives. The study explores the following four main health beliefs originating from the parents’ interviews: (...)
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  7.  1
    Never Die Alone: Death and Birth in Pure Land Buddhism.Ilana Maymind - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):451-455.
    This is a review of a collection of six essays. These essays, with the exception of one, are written by the followers of Shin Buddhism. The last essay in this collection is written from the perspective of Theravada Buddhism rather than Mahayana Buddhism. This collection is a result of the initiative by Rev. Yoshiharu Tomatsu who, as a Buddhist priest, has acquired hands-on experience in dealing with grieving Temple members and became acutely aware of the discrepancy between a medical system (...)
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  8. Medical Negligence Determinations, the “Right to Try,” and Expanded Access to Innovative Treatments.Meyerson Denise - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):385-400.
    This article considers the issue of expanded access to innovative treatments in the context of recent legislative initiatives in the United Kingdom and the United States. In the United Kingdom, the supporters of legislative change argued that the common law principles governing medical negligence are a barrier to innovation. In an attempt to remove this perceived impediment, two bills proposed that innovating doctors sued for negligence should be able to rely in their defence on the fact that their decision to (...)
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  9.  2
    Are Wrongful Life Actions Threatening the Value of Human Life?Vera Lúcia Raposo - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):339-345.
    Most courts around the world have been refusing wrongful life actions. The main argument invoked is that the supposed compensable injury cannot be classified as such, since life is always a blessing no matter how hard and painful it is.In opposition to mainstream scholars and the dominant case law, this article sustains that life must be distinguished from living conditions, the former being the real injury at stake, since some living conditions are so intolerable that in themselves they justify a (...)
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  10. Stretching the Boundaries of Parental Responsibility and New Legal Guidelines for Determination of Brain Death.Bernadette Richards & Thaddeus Mason Pope - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):323-328.
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  11.  1
    Including People with Dementia in Research: An Analysis of Australian Ethical and Legal Rules and Recommendations for Reform.M. Ries Nola, A. Thompson Katie & Lowe Michael - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):359-374.
    Research is crucial to advancing knowledge about dementia, yet the burden of the disease currently outpaces research activity. Research often excludes people with dementia and other cognitive impairments because researchers and ethics committees are concerned about issues related to capacity, consent, and substitute decision-making. In Australia, participation in research by people with cognitive impairment is governed by a national ethics statement and a patchwork of state and territorial laws that have widely varying rules. We contend that this legislative variation precludes (...)
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  12.  2
    Political Minimalism and Social Debates: The Case of Human-Enhancement Technologies.Javier Rodríguez-Alcázar - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):347-357.
    A faulty understanding of the relationship between morality and politics encumbers many contemporary debates on human enhancement. As a result, some ethical reflections on enhancement undervalue its social dimensions, while some social approaches to the topic lack normative import. In this essay, I use my own conception of the relationship between ethics and politics, which I call “political minimalism,” in order to support and strengthen the existing social perspectives on human-enhancement technologies.
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  13. Futile Treatment—A Review.Lenko Šarić, Ivana Prkić & Marko Jukić - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):329-337.
    The main goal of intensive care medicine is helping patients survive acute threats to their lives, while preserving and restoring life quality. Because of medical advancements, it is now possible to sustain life to an extent that would previously have been difficult to imagine. However, the goals of medicine are not to preserve organ function or physiological activity but to treat and improve the health of a person as a whole. When dealing with medical futilities, physicians and other members of (...)
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  14.  2
    A Virtuous Death: Organ Donation and Eudaimonia.David M. Shaw - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):319-321.
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  15.  1
    A 450-Year-Old Turkish Poem on Medical Ethics.Halil Tekiner - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):445-449.
    The Ottoman physician-poet Nidai of Ankara studied medicine in Crimea and served as a court physician in Istanbul during the reign of Sultan Selim II. Nidai marked the classical period of Ottoman medicine particularly with his acclaimed works and translations in Turkish, among which Manafi al-Nas became widely known. The final chapter of Manafi al-Nas also is known independently under the name Vasiyyetname, which is a remarkable guide on medical ethics. This didactic, sixty-eight-line poem includes Nidai’s moral advice to physicians (...)
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  16.  3
    Sex, Drugs, and a Few Other Things.Michael Ashby - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):163-165.
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  17.  2
    How Sex Selection Undermines Reproductive Autonomy.Tamara Kayali Browne - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):195-204.
    Non-medical sex selection is premised on the notion that the sexes are not interchangeable. Studies of individuals who undergo sex selection for non-medical reasons, or who have a preference for a son or daughter, show that they assume their child will conform to the stereotypical roles and norms associated with their sex. However, the evidence currently available has not succeeded in showing that the gender traits and inclinations sought are caused by a “male brain” or a “female brain”. Therefore, as (...)
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  18.  2
    Bioethics and Biopolitics: Presents and Futures of Reproduction.Silvia Camporesi - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):177-181.
    This Bioethics and Biopolitics: Presents and Futures of Reproduction symposium draws together a series of articles that were each submitted independently by their authors to the JBI and which explore the biopower axis in the externalization of reproduction in four contexts: artificial gestation, PGD for sex selection, women’s rights, and testicular cryopreservation. While one contribution explores a “future” of reproduction, the other three explore a “present,” or better, explore different “presents.” What may counts as “present,” and what may count as (...)
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  19.  2
    Erratum To: Bioethics and Biopolitics: Presents and Futures of Reproduction.Silvia Camporesi - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):183-183.
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  20. The Role of a Hospital Ethics Consultation Service in Decision-Making for Unrepresented Patients.Andrew M. Courtwright, Joshua Abrams & Ellen M. Robinson - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):241-250.
    Despite increased calls for hospital ethics committees to serve as default decision-makers about life-sustaining treatment for unrepresented patients who lack decision-making capacity or a surrogate decision-maker and whose wishes regarding medical care are not known, little is known about how committees currently function in these cases. This was a retrospective cohort study of all ethics committee consultations involving decision-making about LST for unrepresented patients at a large academic hospital from 2007 to 2013. There were 310 ethics committee consultations, twenty-five of (...)
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  21.  1
    Regulating the New: A Consideration of CRISPR and Approaches to Professional Standards of Practitioners of Chinese Medicine in Australia and Accessing the NDIS.Barry R. Furrow & Bernadette J. Richards - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):167-172.
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  22.  3
    The Perfect Womb: Promoting Equality of Opportunity.Kendal Evie - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):185-194.
    This paper aims to address how artificial gestation might affect equality of opportunity for the unborn and any resultant generation of “ectogenetic” babies. It will first explore the current legal obstacles preventing the development of ectogenesis, before looking at the benefits of allowing this technology to control fetal growth and development. This will open up a discussion of the treatment/enhancement divide regarding the use of reproductive technologies, a topic featured in various bioethical debates on the subject. Using current maternity practices (...)
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  23.  1
    Ethical and Regulatory Challenges with Autologous Adult Stem Cells: A Comparative Review of International Regulations.Tamra Lysaght, Ian H. Kerridge, Douglas Sipp, Gerard Porter & Benjamin J. Capps - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):261-273.
    Cell and tissue-based products, such as autologous adult stem cells, are being prescribed by physicians across the world for diseases and illnesses that they have neither been approved for or been demonstrated as safe and effective in formal clinical trials. These doctors often form part of informal transnational networks that exploit differences and similarities in the regulatory systems across geographical contexts. In this paper, we examine the regulatory infrastructure of five geographically diverse but socio-economically comparable countries with the aim of (...)
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  24. Stigma and Self-Stigma in Addiction.Steve Matthews, Robyn Dwyer & Anke Snoek - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):275-286.
    Addictions are commonly accompanied by a sense of shame or self-stigmatization. Self-stigmatization results from public stigmatization in a process leading to the internalization of the social opprobrium attaching to the negative stereotypes associated with addiction. We offer an account of how this process works in terms of a range of looping effects, and this leads to our main claim that for a significant range of cases public stigma figures in the social construction of addiction. This rests on a social constructivist (...)
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  25. Autonomy and Reproductive Rights of Married Ikwerre Women in Rivers State, Nigeria.Chitu Womehoma Princewill, Ayodele Samuel Jegede, Tenzin Wangmo, Anita Riecher-Rössler & Bernice Simone Elger - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):205-215.
    A woman’s lack of or limited reproductive autonomy could lead to adverse health effects, feeling of being inferior, and above all being unable to adequately care for her children. Little is known about the reproductive autonomy of married Ikwerre women of Rivers State, Nigeria. This study demonstrates how Ikwerre women understand the terms autonomy and reproductive rights and what affects the exercise of these rights. An exploratory research design was employed for this study. A semi-structured interview schedule was used to (...)
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  26.  4
    Dutch Protocols for Deliberately Ending the Life of Newborns: A Defence.Matthew Tedesco - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):251-259.
    The Groningen Protocol, introduced in the Netherlands in 2005 and accompanied by revised guidelines published in a report commissioned by the Royal Dutch Medical Association in 2014, specifies conditions under which the lives of severely ill newborns may be deliberately ended. Its publication came four years after the Netherlands became the first nation to legalize the voluntary active euthanasia of adults, and the Netherlands remains the only country to offer a pathway to protecting physicians who might engage in deliberately ending (...)
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  27.  5
    Discovering the Neural Nature of Moral Cognition? Empirical, Theoretical, and Practical Challenges in Bioethical Research with Electroencephalography (EEG).Nils-Frederic Wagner, Pedro Chaves & Annemarie Wolff - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):1-15.
    In this article we critically review the neural mechanisms of moral cognition that have recently been studied via electroencephalography (EEG). Such studies promise to shed new light on traditional moral questions by helping us to understand how effective moral cognition is embodied in the brain. It has been argued that conflicting normative ethical theories require different cognitive features and can, accordingly, in a broadly conceived naturalistic attempt, be associated with different brain processes that are rooted in different brain networks and (...)
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  28. Against Cursory Treatments in Ethics of Medical Migration From Underserved Countries.Yusuf Yuksekdag - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):173-176.
    In a recent paper, Mpofu, Sen Gupta, and Hays attempt to outline the obligations of recruiting high-income countries and would-be emigrant health workers to tackle the effects of mass exodus of health workers from underserved regions. They reconstruct Rawlsian and Kantian global justice approaches to argue for moral obligations of HICs and an individual justice approach to point to non-enforceable social responsibilities of HWs to assist their compatriots. This critical commentary demonstrates that the argumentation within their individual justice approach is (...)
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  29.  4
    The Ninth Circle: Who and What Do We Trust In Today’s World?Michael Ashby - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):7-12.
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  30.  5
    Vaccine Rejecting Parents’ Engagement With Expert Systems That Inform Vaccination Programs.Katie Attwell, Julie Leask, Samantha B. Meyer, Philippa Rokkas & Paul Ward - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):65-76.
    In attempting to provide protection to individuals and communities, childhood immunization has benefits that far outweigh disease risks. However, some parents decide not to immunize their children with some or all vaccines for reasons including lack of trust in governments, health professionals, and vaccine manufacturers. This article employs a theoretical analysis of trust and distrust to explore how twenty-seven parents with a history of vaccine rejection in two Australian cities view the expert systems central to vaccination policy and practice. Our (...)
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  31.  10
    Four Reasons Why Assisted Dying Should Not Be Offered for Depression.Thomas Blikshavn, Tonje Lossius Husum & Morten Magelssen - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):151-157.
    Recently, several authors have argued that assisted dying may be ethically appropriate when requested by a person who suffers from serious depression unresponsive to treatment. We here present four arguments to the contrary. First, the arguments made by proponents of assisted dying rely on notions of “treatment-resistant depression” that are problematic. Second, an individual patient suffering from depression may not be justified in believing that chances of recovery are minimal. Third, the therapeutic significance of hope must be acknowledged; when mental (...)
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  32.  1
    Saving Deaf Children? Screening for Hearing Loss as a Public-Interest Case.Sigrid Bosteels, Michel Vandenbroeck & Geert Van Hove - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):109-121.
    New-born screening programs for congenital disorders and chronic disease are expanding worldwide and children “at risk” are identified by nationwide tracking systems at the earliest possible stage. These practices are never neutral and raise important social and ethical questions. An emergent concern is that a reflexive professionalism should interrogate the ever earlier interference in children’s lives. The Flemish community of Belgium was among the first to generalize the screening for hearing loss in young children and is an interesting case to (...)
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  33.  3
    “Harvesting” and Use of Human Stem Cells: An Islamic Evaluation.Anke I. Bouzenita - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):97-108.
    This paper gives insight into the Islamic bioethical discussion on harvesting and using human embryonic and adult stem cells. It describes some of the Islamic legal mechanisms involved in the bioethical discourse among Muslims. As the contemporary Islamic bioethical discourse is very diverse, the paper focuses on the critical discussion of related resolutions of the Saudi-based Islamic Fiqh Academy due to the esteem in which the IFA is held in the Islamic world and the pertinence of their rulings on this (...)
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  34.  1
    The Moral of the Tale: Stories, Trust, and Public Engagement with Clinical Ethics Via Radio and Theatre.Bowman Deborah - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):43-52.
    Trust is frequently discussed with reference to the professional–patient relationship. However, trust is less explored in relation to the ways in which understanding of, and responses to, questions of ethics are discussed by both the “public” and “experts.” Public engagement activity in healthcare ethics may invoke “trust” in analysing a moral question or problem but less frequently conceives of trust as integral to “public engagement” itself. This paper explores the relationship between trust and the ways in which questions of healthcare (...)
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  35.  6
    Investigating Trust, Expertise, and Epistemic Injustice in Chronic Pain.Z. Buchman Daniel, Ho Anita & S. Goldberg Daniel - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):31-42.
    Trust is central to the therapeutic relationship, but the epistemic asymmetries between the expert healthcare provider and the patient make the patient, the trustor, vulnerable to the provider, the trustee. The narratives of pain sufferers provide helpful insights into the experience of pain at the juncture of trust, expert knowledge, and the therapeutic relationship. While stories of pain sufferers having their testimonies dismissed are well documented, pain sufferers continue to experience their testimonies as being epistemically downgraded. This kind of epistemic (...)
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  36.  5
    Investigating Public Trust in Expert Knowledge: Narrative, Ethics, and Engagement.Camporesi Silvia, Vaccarella Maria & Davis Mark - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):23-30.
    “Public Trust in Expert Knowledge: Narrative, Ethics, and Engagement” examines the social, cultural, and ethical ramifications of changing public trust in the expert biomedical knowledge systems of emergent and complex global societies. This symposium was conceived as an interdisciplinary project, drawing on bioethics, the social sciences, and the medical humanities. We settled on public trust as a topic for our work together because its problematization cuts across our fields and substantive research interests. For us, trust is simultaneously a matter of (...)
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  37. How Can Respectfulness in Medical Professionals Be Increased? A Complex But Important Question.Claudine Clucas & Lindsay St Claire - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):123-133.
    Respectfulness is demanded of doctors and predicts more positive patient health-related outcomes, but research is scarce on ways to promote it. This study explores two ways to conceptualize unconditional respect from medical students, defined as respect paid to people on the basis of their humanity, in order to inform strategies to increase it. Unconditional respect conceptualized as an attitude suggests that unconditional respect and conditional respect are additive, whereas unconditional respect conceptualized as a personality trait suggests that people who are (...)
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  38.  3
    The Biopolitics of Lifestyle: Foucault, Ethics and Healthy Choices.Andrew Cooper - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):159-162.
    Unlike many recent studies on the notion of lifestyle, Christopher Mayes’ The Biopolitics of Lifestyle balances theoretical rigour with empirical investigation to problematize the use of lifestyle in public health strategies. Not only does Mayes’ book expose the unjustified emphasis on individual autonomy undergirding neoliberal strategies of governance and contemporary ethical theory, it also marks a significant step forward in enhancing our understanding of one of Foucault’s most underappreciated concepts, the dispositif. In clearly framing the import of Foucaultian analysis and (...)
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  39. Prestidigitation Vs. Public Trust: Or How We Can Learn to Change the Conversation and Prevent Powers From “Organizing the Discontent”.E. Rich Leigh - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):1-6.
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  40. Gestational Diabetes Testing, Narrative, and Medical Distrust.Jennifer Edwell & Jordynn Jack - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):53-63.
    In this article, we investigate the role of scientific and patient narratives on perceptions of the medical debate around gestational diabetes testing. Among medical scientists, we show that the narrative surrounding GDM testing affirms that future research and data will lead to medical consensus. We call this narrative trajectory the “deferred quest.” For patients, however, diagnosis and their subsequent discovery that biomedicine does not speak in one voice ruptures their trust in medical authority. This new distrust creates space for patients (...)
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  41.  1
    How Should We Respond to Non-Dominant Healing Practices, the Example of Homeopathy.Ben Gray - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):87-96.
    The debate around the ethics of homeopathy in recent issues of the journal has been approached as a binary question; is homeopathy ethical or not? This paper suggests that this is an unhelpful question and instead discusses a framework to establish the extent to which the dominant culture should tolerate non-dominant health practices such as homeopathy. This requires a sophisticated understanding of the placebo effect, a critical evaluation of what evidence is available, a consideration of the harm that the non-dominant (...)
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  42.  6
    The Value of Vagueness in the Politics of Authorship.Bart Penders - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):13-15.
  43.  3
    Debates About Conflict of Interest in Medicine: Deconstructing a Divided Discourse.Serena Purdy, Miles Little, Christopher Mayes & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):135-149.
    The pharmaceutical industry plays an increasingly dominant role in healthcare, raising concerns about “conflicts of interest” on the part of the medical professionals who interact with the industry. However, there is considerable disagreement over the extent to which COI is a problem and how it should be managed. Participants in debates about COI have become entrenched in their views, which is both unproductive and deeply confusing for the majority of medical professionals trying to work in an increasingly commercialized environment. We (...)
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  44. Considering Professional Misconduct and Best Interests of a Child.J. Richards Bernadette & Okninski Michaela - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):19-22.
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  45. A Response to Penders: The Disvalue of Vagueness in Authorship.David Shaw - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):17-17.
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  46.  1
    Donor Conception and “Passing,” or; Why Australian Parents of Donor-Conceived Children Want Donors Who Look Like Them.Wong Karen-Anne - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):77-86.
    This article explores the processes through which Australian recipients select unknown donors for use in assisted reproductive technologies and speculates on how those processes may affect the future life of the donor-conceived person. I will suggest that trust is an integral part of the exchange between donors, recipients, and gamete agencies in donor conception and heavily informs concepts of relatedness, race, ethnicity, kinship, class, and visibility. The decision to be transparent about a child’s genetic parentage affects recipient parents’ choices of (...)
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  47. Race Research and the Ethics of Belief.Jonny Anomaly - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14:1-11.
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