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  1.  1
    Rethinking the Daoist Concept of Nature.David Chai - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):259-274.
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  2.  1
    Preface: On Saving Anthropocene.Chung‐Ying Cheng - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):175-177.
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  3.  1
    Receptivity and Creativity in Hermeneutics: From Gadamer to Onto‐Hermeneutics.Chung‐Ying Cheng - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):313-335.
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  4.  1
    Henry Bugbee, Wilderness, and the Omnirelevance of the Ten‐Thousand Things.James Hatley - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):295-312.
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  5.  7
    When There Are No More Cats to Argue About: Chan Buddhist Views of Animals in Relation to Universal Buddha‐Nature.Steven Heine - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):239-258.
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  6.  1
    Franklin Perkins. Heaven and Earth Are Not Humane: The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy.On‐cho Ng - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):336-339.
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  7.  1
    A Confucian‐Kantian Response to Environmental Eco‐Centrism on Animal Equality.Stephen R. Palmquist & Keith Ka‐Fu Chan - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):221-238.
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  8. Introduction: Ecology and Chinese Philosophy.Martin Schönfeld - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):178-184.
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  9. Greening Confucius: Appropriating the Analects for a Future‐Oriented Reading.Martin Schönfeld - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):185-202.
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  10.  2
    Joseph Chan. Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times.Chi Zhang - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):343-345.
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  11.  6
    Garret P. S. Olberding. Dubious Facts: The Evidence of Early Chinese Historiography.Liang Cai - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):164-166.
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  12.  3
    Preface: Meaning of Sports and Cultivation of Civil Life.Chung‐Ying Cheng - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):3-5.
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  13.  5
    A Confucian Perspective on Lebron and Loyalty.David Elstein - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):67-84.
    This article uses LeBron James's departure from the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2010 to examine the question of athletes’ loyalty to their team and to their region. Athletes often face significant criticism when they leave their original team as it supposedly indicates a lack of loyalty. Given Confucian emphasis on the importance of community, it might be expected that Confucians would endorse this criticism. Instead, I argue that properly understood, James's decision was probably permissible from a Confucian perspective.
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  14.  3
    Introduction: Physicality, Spirituality, and Chinese Philosophy.Mathew A. Foust - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):6-8.
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  15.  3
    On the Compatibility Between Confucianism and Modern Olympism.Leo Hsu & Jesús Ilundáin‐Agurruza - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):103-123.
    At the confluence between Modern Olympism and Confucian teachings—nowadays embodied and expressed in East Asian Confucianisms—there are meaningful overlaps, significant challenges, and opportunities. This paper examines these. Despite radically different origins and apparently incommensurate tenets, we should not assume that the underlying ideals of Modern Olympism and East Asian Confucianisms cannot benefit mutually. It is precisely when considering their putative weak points, such as Modern Olympism's soft metaphysics or vague ethics or Confucianism's bias against physical activity or gender, that we (...)
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  16.  1
    The Dao of Dressage: Mysticism and Aesthetic Experience in Equestrian Sports.Heather E. Keith - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):85-102.
    There are many popular treatments of Zen/Chan and Daoist themes related to working with horses; however, these works tend to be fairly superficial treatments of philosophical traditions. For deeper consideration of the philosophy of horse sports such as dressage, I explore themes and imagery in the Daodejing, such as noncontention, flow, humility, and mysticism that may help riders to unpack and enhance the experience of working with a nonhuman teammate. Comparative work, such as with Dewey's theory of aesthetic experience and (...)
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  17.  8
    Kim Iryŏp. Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun. Translated with an Introduction by Jin Y. Park.Halla Kim - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):170-172.
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  18.  3
    The Fanwu Liuxing and its Intellectual Discussion About the One.Sungryule Lee - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):136-153.
    This article presents a translation of an uncovered bamboo text, Fanwu Liuxing, with some discussions on the nature of the text. The FW proposes the One as the primordial entity which can stabilize and maintain the existence and movement of all nature as well as all the phenomena and orders in the nature and humanity. To the rulers, the acquisition of the One makes possible the unification of the world and, moreover, its stable control, leading eventually to the most valuable (...)
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  19.  4
    Joseph A. Adler. Reconstructing the Confucian Dao: Zhu Xi's Appropriation of Zhou Dunyi.Li Lizhu - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):161-164.
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  20.  3
    Erin M. Cline. Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice.Joshua Mason - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):154-157.
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  21.  1
    Li Feng. Early China: A Social and Cultural History.Thomas McConochie - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):167-169.
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  22.  2
    Chung‐Ying Cheng: Creativity, Onto‐Generative Hermeneutics, and the Yijing.Eric Nelson - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):124-135.
    The hermeneutical dimensions of Chinese philosophy from the Changes of Zhou through its Confucian, Daoist, and contemporary developments have been a creative inspirational source and guiding intellectual thread in the thought of Chung-ying Cheng. Cheng's extensive engagement with the Classic of Changes, its role in the formation of the Chinese philosophical tradition and its comparative interconnections with occidental philosophies, has disclosed its deep hermeneutical orientation. The Yijing encompasses processes of empirical observation, empathetic feeling, and self-reflection in the generation of “images,” (...)
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  23.  5
    Can Bad Guys Have Good Gongfu?—A Preliminary Exploration of Gongfu Ethics.Peimin Ni - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):9-31.
    This paper tries to explore a gongfu ethics on the basis of traditional Chinese ethical theories. Used in the sense that the Song-Ming Neo-Confucians did, “gongfu” means the art of life in general and not merely the martial arts, although martial arts can be taken as a paradigm example of gongfu. The paper begins with the question “can bad guys have good gongfu,” which leads to three answers, each representing one stage of the dynamic relationship between morality and gongfu: The (...)
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  24.  2
    Flourishing, Sports, and Doping: A Confucian Virtue‐Ethical Meditation.Christopher Panza - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):32-50.
    In most sports ethics, doping is addressed from a deontological or consequentialist perspective. It is suggested here that a virtue-ethical analysis informed by Confucianism can capture intuitions about the need to cultivate flourishing in sports. Specifically, it is argued that the Confucian virtues of zhong 忠 and shu 恕, necessary for Confucian ren 仁, can help us to articulate an account of flourishing in sports. As each Confucian virtue is articulated and then applied to sports, consideration is given to how (...)
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  25.  5
    Sages, Heroes, and the Battle for Cycling's Soul.Heather L. Reid - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):51-66.
    Using my experience at a stage of the 2014 Giro d'Italia, I argue that de is the soul of cycling and that ancient Chinese philosophy's insight into the conditions that promote de may help the sport. I compare the relationship between sages and virtuous practitioners, to the ancient Greek relationship between heroes and athletes, both of which depend on the performance of de. I also criticize modern cycling for its focus on technology, stark commercialism, and emphasis on the individual, prescribing (...)
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  26.  2
    Katrin Froese. Ethics Unbound: Chinese and Western Perspectives on Morality.Bongrae Seok - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):157-161.
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