7 found

Year:

  1.  16
    Chemical Graph Theory and the Sherlock Holmes Principle.Alexandru T. Balaban - 2013 - Hyle 19 (1):107 - 134.
    The development of chemical applications of graph theory is reviewed from a personal perspective. Graph-theoretical methods for finding all graphs fulfilling certain mathematical conditions followed by eliminating chemically impossible solutions are equivalent to the ‘Sherlock Holmes principle’. For molecular graphs, this is illustrated by monocyclic aromatic systems and by valence isomers of annulenes. Using dualist graphs for benzenoids and diamond hydrocarbons it was possible to develop simple encoding systems that allowed convenient enumerations of isomers. Starting with the invention of reaction (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  16
    Philosophy of Mathematical Chemistry: A Personal Perspective.Subhash C. Basak - 2013 - Hyle 19 (1):3 - 17.
    This article discusses the nature of mathematical chemistry, discrete mathematical chemistry in particular. Molecules and macromolecules can be represented by model objects using methods of discrete mathematics, e.g., graphs and matrices. Mathematical formalisms are further applied on the model objects to distill various quantitative characteristics. The end product of such an exercise can be a better understanding of chemistry, the development of quantitative scales for qualitative notions of chemistry, or an illumination of the structural basis of chemical and biological properties. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  4
    What Can Mathematical Chemistry Contribute to the Development of Mathematics?Haruo Hosoya - 2013 - Hyle 19 (1):87 - 105.
    It is pointed out that visualization, such as the structural formula of molecules, is the most important factor in ‘chemical thinking’. How mathematical chemistry has contributed to the development of mathematics is described with particular reference to the topological index or Z-index, proposed by the present author, and fullerene chemistry developed by mathematical chemists in various countries. Mathematical chemistry will be able to contribute to the development of mathematics by interplaying with mathematicians in the same way as it has been (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  8
    Mathematical Chemistry! Is It? And If so, What Is It?Douglas J. Klein - 2013 - Hyle 19 (1):35 - 85.
    Mathematical chemistry entailing the development of novel mathematics for chemical applications is argued to exist, and to manifest an extremely diverse range of applications. Yet further it is argued to have a substantial history of well over a century, though the field has perhaps only attained a degree of recognition with a formal widely accepted naming in the last few decades. The evidence here for the broad range and long history is by way of numerous briefly noted example sub-areas. That (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  8
    Book Review: Hinne Hettema: "Reducing Chemistry to Physics: Limits, Models, Consequences". [REVIEW]Olimpia Lombardi - 2013 - Hyle 19 (1):135 - 137.
  6.  5
    Editorial: Editorial Introduction: Chemistry and Mathematics, Part 2.Guillermo Restrepo & Joachim Schummer - 2013 - Hyle 19 (1):1 - 2.
  7.  3
    Discrete Mathematical Chemistry: Social Aspects of its Emergence and Reception.Guillermo Restrepo & José L. Villaveces - 2013 - Hyle 19 (1):19 - 33.
    We first show some successes of discrete mathematical chemistry (DMC), a branch of theoretical chemistry born in the 1960s and 1970s. Then we explore the social context in which the emergence of DMC took place, initiated mainly in East European countries. The availability of knowledge, especially of mathematical knowledge, and the lack of research funds were the main conditions that helped get DMC started. We also explore the reception of DMC in the chemical and mathematical circles, being flat rejection in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues