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  1.  1
    Cross-Cultural Differences in Informal Argumentation: Norms, Inductive Biases and Evidentiality.Hatice Karaslaan, Annette Hohenberger, Hilmi Demir, Simon Hall & Mike Oaksford - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (3-4):358-389.
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  2.  3
    Why Was the Color Violet Rarely Used by Artists Before the 1860s?Allen Tager - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (3-4):262-273.
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  3. Tunes and Tones: Music, Language, and Inhibitory Control.Robert E. Graham & Usha Lakshmanan - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):104-123.
    A debate is underway regarding the perceptual and cognitive benefits of bilingualism and musical experience. This study contributes to the debate by investigating auditory inhibitory control in English-speaking monolingual musicians, non-musicians, tone language bilinguals, and non-tone language bilinguals. We predicted that musicians and tone language bilinguals would demonstrate enhanced processing relative to monolinguals and other bilinguals. Groups of monolinguals, monolingual musicians, non-tone language bilinguals and tone language bilinguals were compared on auditory Stroop tasks to assess domain-transferable processing benefits resulting from (...)
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  4. Gateways to Culture: Play, Games, Metaphors, and Institutions.Robert Scott Kretchmar - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):47-65.
    In this essay I develop a case for games as a primitive form of culture and an early arrival at our ancestors’ cultural gates. I analyze the modest intellectual prerequisites for game behavior including the use of metaphor, a reliance on constitutive rules, and an ability to understand the logic of entailment. In arguing for its early arrival during the late Middle and Upper Paleolithic, I develop a case for its powerful adaptive qualities in terms of both natural and sexual (...)
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  5. Owls, Climates, and Experts.Robert L. Munroe & Mary Gauvain - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):66-88.
    The cognitive research of Atran and Medin plus preliminary cross-cultural inquiry about owls permitted the formulation of a hypothesis: Inhabitants of cold-climate societies were likely to be, in relative terms, “experts” on owls. Subsequent cross-cultural study affirmed that in cold-climate societies, in contrast to others, the habits and characteristics of owls were more frequently noted, these birds were more often used functionally, and the human inhabitants of cold-climate areas manifested fewer negative supernaturalistic interpretations of owl behavior. For the sample as (...)
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  6. Fan and Non-Fan Recollection of Faces in Fandom-Related Art and Costumes.Stephen Reysen, Courtney N. Plante, Sharon E. Roberts & Kathleen C. Gerbasi - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):224-229.
    We compared face recognition of humans and fandom-themed characters between a sample of furries and non-furries. Participants viewed images that included humans, drawn anthropomorphic animals, and anthropomorphic animal costumes, and were later tested on their ability to recognize faces from a subset of the viewed images. While furries and non-furries did not differ in their recollection of human faces, furries showed significantly better memory for faces in furry-themed artwork and costumes. The results are discussed in relation to own-group bias in (...)
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  7. Cost Do Not Explain Trust Among Secular Groups.John H. Shaver, Susan DiVietro, Martin Lang & Richard Sosis - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):180-204.
    Many human groups achieve high levels of trust and cooperation, but these achievements are vulnerable to exploitation. Several theorists have suggested that when groups impose costs on their members, these costs can function to limit freeriding, and hence promote trust and cooperation. While a substantial body of experimental research has demonstrated a positive relationship between costs and cooperation in religious groups, to date, this relationship has not held for secular groups. Here we extend this line of research by comparing trust (...)
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  8. Conceptual Similarities Among Fantasy and Religious Orientations: A Developmental Perspective.Rachel B. Thidodeau, Melissa M. Brown, Alexandra F. Nancarrow, Karrie E. Elpers & Ansley Tullos Gilpin - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):31-46.
    Often in conservative religious populations, fantastical thoughts, interests, and beliefs are discouraged because fantastical beliefs are thought to contradict religious doctrine. However, beliefs in invisible, omnipotent entities such as God and Santa Claus likely rely on similar conceptual abilities that might complement rather than contradict religiosity. Therefore, the present study examined how one’s current and retrospective fantasy orientation together are associated with religious orientation. Data from a sample of 150 adults demonstrated that propensity toward fantasy predicted degree of religious orientation (...)
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  9. Individual Choose-to-Transmit Decisions Reveal Little Preference for Transmitting Negative or High-Arousal Content.Florian van Leeuwen, Nora Parren, Helena Miton & Pascal Boyer - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):124-153.
    Research on social transmission suggests that people preferentially transmit information about threats and social interactions. Such biases might be driven by the arousal that is experienced as part of the emotional response triggered by information about threats or social relationships. The current studies tested whether preferences for transmitting threat-relevant information are consistent with a functional motive to recruit social support. USA residents were recruited for six online studies. Studies 1a and 1B showed that participants more often chose to transmit positive, (...)
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  10. Brungarians Use It Differently! Children's Understanding of Artifact Funcation as a Cultural Convention.Drew Weatherhead & Shaylene Nancekivell - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):89-103.
    Children not only recognize the function of an artifact, but they actively protest when others use it in an atypical way. In two experiments, we asked whether children view artifact function as universal or as culturally dependent. In both experiments children watched videos of two actors who used common artifacts atypically. In Experiment 1A, 6-to-7-year-old children were told that the actors were either from Canada or a far away country. Children were marginally more likely to protest a Canadian using the (...)
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  11. Seeking Common Cause Between Cognitive Science and Ethnography: Alternative Logic in Cooperative Action.Thomas Widlok & Keith Stenning - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):1-30.
    Alternative logics have been invoked periodically to explain the systematically different modes of thought of the subjects of ethnography: one logic for ‘us’ and another for ‘them’. Recently anthropologists have cast doubt on the tenability of such an explanation of difference. In cognitive science, [Stenning and van Lambalgen, 2008] proposed that with the modern development of multiple logics, at least several logics are required for making sense of the cognitive processes of reasoning for different purposes and in different contexts. Alongside (...)
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  12. The Rhythms of Discontnet: Synchrony Impedes Performance and Group Functioning in an Interdependent Coordination Task.Connor Wood, Catherine Caldwell-Harris & Anna Stopa - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (1-2):154-179.
    Synchrony — intentional, rhythmic motor entrainment in groups — is an important topic in social psychology and the cognitive science of religion. Synchrony has been found to increase trust and prosociality, to index interpersonal attention, and to induce perceptions of similarity and group cohesion. Causal explanations suggest that synchrony induces neurocognitive self-other blurring, leading participants to process one another as identical. In light of such findings, researchers have highlighted synchrony as an important evolved tool for establishing and maintaining collective identity (...)
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  13.  8
    The Needs of the Many Do Not Outweigh the Needs of the Few: The Limits of Individual Sacrifice Across Diverse Cultures.Mark Sheskin, Coralie Chevallier, Kuniko Adachi, Renatas Berniūnas, Thomas Castelain, Martin Hulin, Hillary Lenfesty, Denis André Patrick Regnier, Aniko Sebesteny & Nicolas Baumard - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18:205-223.
    A long tradition of research in WEIRD (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, Democratic) countries has investigated how people weigh individual welfare versus group welfare in their moral judgments. Relatively less research has investigated the generalizability of results across non-WEIRD populations. In the current study, we ask participants across nine diverse cultures (Bali, Costa Rica, France, Guatemala, Japan, Madagascar, Mongolia, Serbia, and the USA) to make a series of moral judgments regarding both third-party sacrifice for group welfare and first-person sacrifice for group (...)
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