Year:

  1.  2
    Children’s Ethno-National Flag Categories in Three Divided Societies.Jocelyn B. Dautel, Edona Maloku, Ana Tomovska Misoska & Laura K. Taylor - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (5):373-402.
    Flags are conceptual representations that can prime nationalism and allegiance to one’s group. Investigating children’s understanding of conflict-related ethno-national flags in divided societies sheds light on the development of national categories. We explored the development of children’s awareness of, and preferences for, ethno-national flags in Northern Ireland, Kosovo, and the Republic of North Macedonia. Children displayed early categorization of, and ingroup preferences for, ethno-national flags. By middle-childhood, children’s conflict-related social categories shaped systematic predictions about other’s group-based preferences for flags. Children (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  2
    Towards a Standard Model of the Cognitive Science of Nationalism – the Calendar.Michal Fux & Amílcar Antonio Barreto - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (5):432-457.
    The Cognitive Science of Nationalistic Behavior, presented in this paper, integrates the political sciences of nationalities as invented communities with an evolutionary cognitive analysis of social forms as products of the human mind. The framework is modeled after the Cognitive Science of Religion, where decades of cross-disciplinary work has generated standards, predictions, and data about the role of individual cognitive tendencies in shaping societies. We study the nationalistic calendar as a cultural attractor and draw on cue-based behavioral motivation and differential (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  7
    How Propaganda Works: Nationalism, Revenge and Empathy in Serbia.Jordan Kiper, Yeongjin Gwon & Richard Ashby Wilson - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (5):403-431.
    What is the relationship between war propaganda and nationalism, and what are the effects of each on support for, or participation in, violent acts? This is an important question for international criminal law and ongoing speech crime trials, where prosecutors and judges continue to assert that there is a clear causal link between war propaganda, nationalism, and mass violence. Although most legal judgments hinge on the criminal intent of propagandists, the question of whether and to what extent propaganda and nationalism (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  2
    Ethnic Essentialism or Conciliatory Multiculturalism? The People’s Republic of China.Raymond U. Scupin - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (5):458-480.
    Numerous scholars from different fields ranging from history, political science, ethnic and cultural studies, sociology, and anthropology have discussed ethnic and racial identity issues in the People’s Republic of China. Most have noted that there are competing narratives regarding the conceptions of race and ethnicity. Much of the scholarship has been based on social constructivist orientations. This essay is directed towards a merger between social constructivist and cognitive science approaches on essentialism that may open the doors for further research and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  5
    HIDD’N HADD in Intelligent Design.Andrew Ross Atkinson - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):304-316.
    The idea that religious belief is ‘almost inevitable’ is so forcefully argued by Justin Barrett that it can warrant justifiable concern – especially since he claims atheism is an unnatural handicap. In this article, I argue that religious belief in Homo sapiens isn’t inevitable – and that Barrett does agree when pushed. I describe the role played by a Hyperactive Agency Detection Device in the generation of belief in God as necessary but insufficient in explaining religious culture – I distance (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  4
    Moral and Conventional Violations in Childhood: Brazilians Tolerate Less but Expect More Punishment Than U.S. Americans.Susana K. de M. Oliveira, Deise M. L. F. Mendes, Ebenézer A. de Oliveira & Luciana F. Pessôa - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):282-303.
    Brazilian and US American children were compared for differences in tolerance and punishment expectancy. We hypothesized that participants would be less tolerant and more punishing of moral than conventional violations; tolerance and punishment expectancy would relate with age; Brazilians would tolerate less and expect more punishment than US Americans; and social domain would moderate effects of age and nationality. The sample had 129 matched children from Brazil and the USA. Moral/conventional-violation vignettes were used. Mixed-model GLMs suggested that children were less (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  1
    Does Cognitive Structure Ground Social Structure? The Case of the Radical Enlightenment.Laurence Fiddick - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):317-337.
    Cross-culturally two widely observed forms of social structure are individualism and ascribed hierarchies. Associated with these two types of social structure are a wide range of recurrent concomitant features. It is proposed that these two forms of social structure are common, in part, because they are associated with modular forms of understanding that lend intuitive support to them. In particular, it is proposed that individualistic open societies are associated with a folk-physics mode of construal whereas closed societies are associated with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Prestige Does Not Affect the Cultural Transmission of Novel Controversial Arguments in an Online Transmission Chain Experiment.Ángel V. Jiménez & Alex Mesoudi - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):238-261.
    Cultural evolutionary theories define prestige as social rank that is freely conferred on individuals possessing superior knowledge or skill, in order to gain opportunities to learn from such individuals. Consequently, information provided by prestigious individuals should be more memorable, and hence more likely to be culturally transmitted, than information from non-prestigious sources, particularly for novel, controversial arguments about which preexisting opinions are absent or weak. It has also been argued that this effect extends beyond the prestigious individual’s relevant domain of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  3
    Cross-Cultural Differences in Strategies of Peer Persuasion of Hebrew-Speaking and Arabic-Speaking Children.Rachel Karniol - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):355-372.
    The purpose of the current research was to examine strategies of persuasion used by Arabic-speaking and Hebrew-speaking boys and girls to determine the relative contributions of culture and gender in determining communication styles. Children were asked to write a letter to a male or female peer asking for a gender-stereotyped or a gender-neutral gift. Four meta-categories were identified: formality, self-focus, other-focus, and gift-focus. For each meta-category except gift-focus, there were significant main effects and interactions. Language group was significant for formality (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  8
    The Cultural Evolution of Oaths, Ordeals, and Lie Detectors.Hugo Mercier - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):159-187.
    In a great variety of cultures oaths, ordeals, or lie detectors are used to adjudicate in trials, even though they do not reliably discern liars from truth tellers. I suggest that these practices owe their cultural success to the triggering of cognitive mechanisms that make them more culturally attractive. Informal oaths would trigger mechanisms related to commitment in communication. Oaths used in judicial contexts, by invoking supernatural punishments, would trigger intuitions of immanent justice, linking misfortunes following an oath with perjury. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  9
    A Case of Sustained Internal Contradiction: Unresolved Ambivalence Between Evolution and Creationism.S. Emlen Metz, Deena Skolnick Weisberg & Michael Weisberg - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):338-354.
    Many people feel the pull of both creationism and evolution as explanations for the origin of species, despite the direct contradiction. Some respond by endorsing theistic evolution, integrating the scientific and religious explanations by positing that God initiated or guided the process of evolution. Others, however, simultaneously endorse both evolution and creationism despite the contradiction. Here, we illustrate this puzzling phenomenon with interviews with a diverse sample. This qualitative data reveals several approaches to coping with simultaneous inconsistent explanations. For example, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  3
    Violent CRED s Toward Out-Groups Increase Trustworthiness: Preliminary Experimental Evidence.Dan Řezníček & Radek Kundt - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):262-281.
    In the process of cultural learning, people tend to acquire mental representations and behavior from prestigious individuals over dominant ones, as prestigious individuals generously share their expertise and know-how to gain admiration, whereas dominant ones use violence, manipulation, and intimidation to enforce obedience. However, in the context of intergroup conflict, violent thoughts and behavior that are otherwise associated with dominance can hypothetically become prestigious because parochial altruists, who engage in violence against out-groups, act in the interest of their group members, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  5
    Cultural Attraction in Film Evolution: The Case of Anachronies.Oleg Sobchuk & Peeter Tinits - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):218-237.
    In many films, story is presented in an order different from chronological. Deviations from the chronological order in a narrative are called anachronies. Narratological theory and the evidence from psychological experiments indicate that anachronies allow stories to be more interesting, as the non-chronological order evokes curiosity in viewers. In this paper we investigate the historical dynamics in the use of anachronies in film. Particularly, we follow the cultural attraction theory that suggests that, given certain conditions, cultural evolution should conform to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  2
    The Fitness Relevance of Counterintuitive Agents.Thomas Swan & Jamin Halberstadt - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (3-4):188-217.
    Cognitive scientists have attributed the ubiquity of religious narratives partly to the favored recall of minimally counterintuitive concepts within those narratives. Yet, this memory bias is inconsistent, sometimes absent, and without a functional rationale. Here, we asked if MCI concepts are more fitness relevant than intuitive concepts, and if fitness relevance can explain the existence and variability of the observed memory bias. In three studies, participants rated the potential threat and potential opportunity afforded by agents with abilities that violated folk (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  2
    Do Social Constraints Inhibit Analytical Atheism? Cognitive Style and Religiosity in Turkey.Catherine L. Caldwell-Harris, Sevil Hocaoğlu & Jonathan Morgan - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):1-21.
    Recent studies claim that having an analytical cognitive style is correlated with reduced religiosity in western populations. However, in cultural contexts where social norms constrain behavior, such cognitive characteristics may have reduced influence on behaviors and beliefs. We labeled this the ‘constraining environments hypothesis.’ In a sample of 246 Muslims in Turkey, the hypothesis was supported for gender. Females face social pressure to be religious. Unlike their male counterparts, they were more religious, less analytical, and their analytical scores were uncorrelated (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  4
    Peer Exclusion: A Social Convention or Moral Decision? Cross-Cultural Insights Into Students’ Social Reasoning.Seung Yon Ha, Tzu-Jung Lin, Wei-Ting Li, Elizabeth Kraatz, Ying-Ju Chiu, Yu-Ru Hong, Chin-Chung Tsai & Michael Glassman - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):127-154.
    In this study, we examined the role of culture on early adolescents’ social reasoning about peer exclusion. A total of 80 U.S. and 149 Taiwanese early adolescents independently completed a social reasoning essay about peer exclusion. Analyses of the essays based on social-moral theories showed that U.S. students tended to reason about peer exclusion based on social conventional thinking whereas Taiwanese students were more attentive to personal and moral issues. Despite this difference, both groups of students referred to some common (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  2
    Animals, Superman, Fairy and God: Children’s Attributions of Nonhuman Agent Beliefs in Madrid and London.Virginia L. Lam & Silvia Guerrero - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):66-87.
    There have been major developments in the understanding of children’s nonhuman concepts, particularly God concepts, within the past two decades, with a body of cross-cultural studies accumulating. Relatively less research has studied those of non-Christian faiths or children’s concepts of popular occult characters. This paper describes two studies, one in Spain and one in England, examining 5- to 10-year-olds’ human and nonhuman agent beliefs. Both settings were secular, but the latter comprised a Muslim majority. Children were given a false-belief task (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  2
    The Relationship Between Locus of Control and Conformity.Ameer Maadal - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):100-115.
    This study was performed in an attempt to investigate the following three hypotheses: 1) There is a significant relationship between locus of control and conformity. 2) Women conform more in comparison to men. 3) Men have a more internal locus of control compared to women. For this purpose, 365 university students were selected randomly as the sample group, and a questionnaire regarding locus of control and conformity was presented to them. The results showed that there does not exist a significant (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  2
    Early Interculturation, Late Interculturation – Does It Make a Difference in Our Memories?Rachid Oulahal & Patrick Denoux - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):116-126.
    Our research is in the perspective of intercultural psychology and addresses the question of memories an intercultural situation leaves for individuals who experience it during their life. More precisely, it is through the autobiographical memory that our research analyzes the articulation between identity and memory processes in relation to a life experience in an intercultural situation, whether it is a life in a multicultural environment, a migration towards a new cultural environment, a plurality of cultural affiliations or many other configurations (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  6
    Socio-Cognitive and Cultural Influences on Children’s Concepts of God.Anondah R. Saide & Rebekah A. Richert - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):22-40.
    The current study examined the impact of religious socialization practices and parents’ concepts on the development of an abstract religious concept in young children, and whether or not children’s socio-cognitive ability moderates the relationship between their religious concept and sources of information about the concept. 215 parent-child dyads from diverse religious backgrounds participated. Children were between the ages of 3.52 and 6.98 years of age. Four main findings emerged from this study. First, children conceptualized God as more humanlike than their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  5
    Epistemic Vigilance and the Science/Religion Distinction.Konrad Talmont-Kaminski - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):88-99.
    Both science and religion are human endeavours that recruit and modify pre-existing human capacity to engage in epistemic vigilance. However, while science relies upon a focus on content vigilance, religion focusses on source vigilance. This difference is due, in turn, to the function of religious claims not being connected to their accuracy – unlike the function of scientific claims. Understanding this difference helps to understand many aspects of scientific and religious institutions.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  3
    Development and Validation of a Porous Theory of Mind Scale.Michiel van Elk, David Maij & Bastiaan Rutjens - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):41-65.
    We report the results of an empirical investigation of the extent to which supernatural believers endorse a porous conception of the mind, i.e., the belief that one’s thoughts can be directly perceived by others. We developed a porous theory of mind scale, tested its factor structure by using both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, and showed its relation with supernatural beliefs in three studies in the Netherlands and one study with North-American participants. We found that endorsement of a PToM is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  3
    Review: ‘Minds Make Societies’. [REVIEW]Hans Van Eyghen - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):155-158.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues