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  1.  1
    Do Social Constraints Inhibit Analytical Atheism? Cognitive Style and Religiosity in Turkey.Catherine L. Caldwell-Harris, Sevil Hocaoğlu & Jonathan Morgan - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):1-21.
    Recent studies claim that having an analytical cognitive style is correlated with reduced religiosity in western populations. However, in cultural contexts where social norms constrain behavior, such cognitive characteristics may have reduced influence on behaviors and beliefs. We labeled this the ‘constraining environments hypothesis.’ In a sample of 246 Muslims in Turkey, the hypothesis was supported for gender. Females face social pressure to be religious. Unlike their male counterparts, they were more religious, less analytical, and their analytical scores were uncorrelated (...)
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  2.  1
    Peer Exclusion: A Social Convention or Moral Decision? Cross-Cultural Insights Into Students’ Social Reasoning.Seung Yon Ha, Tzu-Jung Lin, Wei-Ting Li, Elizabeth Kraatz, Ying-Ju Chiu, Yu-Ru Hong, Chin-Chung Tsai & Michael Glassman - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):127-154.
    In this study, we examined the role of culture on early adolescents’ social reasoning about peer exclusion. A total of 80 U.S. and 149 Taiwanese early adolescents independently completed a social reasoning essay about peer exclusion. Analyses of the essays based on social-moral theories showed that U.S. students tended to reason about peer exclusion based on social conventional thinking whereas Taiwanese students were more attentive to personal and moral issues. Despite this difference, both groups of students referred to some common (...)
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  3. Animals, Superman, Fairy and God: Children’s Attributions of Nonhuman Agent Beliefs in Madrid and London.Virginia L. Lam & Silvia Guerrero - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):66-87.
    There have been major developments in the understanding of children’s nonhuman concepts, particularly God concepts, within the past two decades, with a body of cross-cultural studies accumulating. Relatively less research has studied those of non-Christian faiths or children’s concepts of popular occult characters. This paper describes two studies, one in Spain and one in England, examining 5- to 10-year-olds’ human and nonhuman agent beliefs. Both settings were secular, but the latter comprised a Muslim majority. Children were given a false-belief task (...)
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  4. The Relationship Between Locus of Control and Conformity.Ameer Maadal - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):100-115.
    This study was performed in an attempt to investigate the following three hypotheses: 1) There is a significant relationship between locus of control and conformity. 2) Women conform more in comparison to men. 3) Men have a more internal locus of control compared to women. For this purpose, 365 university students were selected randomly as the sample group, and a questionnaire regarding locus of control and conformity was presented to them. The results showed that there does not exist a significant (...)
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  5. Early Interculturation, Late Interculturation – Does It Make a Difference in Our Memories?Rachid Oulahal & Patrick Denoux - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):116-126.
    Our research is in the perspective of intercultural psychology and addresses the question of memories an intercultural situation leaves for individuals who experience it during their life. More precisely, it is through the autobiographical memory that our research analyzes the articulation between identity and memory processes in relation to a life experience in an intercultural situation, whether it is a life in a multicultural environment, a migration towards a new cultural environment, a plurality of cultural affiliations or many other configurations (...)
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  6. Socio-Cognitive and Cultural Influences on Children’s Concepts of God.Anondah R. Saide & Rebekah A. Richert - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):22-40.
    The current study examined the impact of religious socialization practices and parents’ concepts on the development of an abstract religious concept in young children, and whether or not children’s socio-cognitive ability moderates the relationship between their religious concept and sources of information about the concept. 215 parent-child dyads from diverse religious backgrounds participated. Children were between the ages of 3.52 and 6.98 years of age. Four main findings emerged from this study. First, children conceptualized God as more humanlike than their (...)
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  7.  2
    Epistemic Vigilance and the Science/Religion Distinction.Konrad Talmont-Kaminski - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):88-99.
    Both science and religion are human endeavours that recruit and modify pre-existing human capacity to engage in epistemic vigilance. However, while science relies upon a focus on content vigilance, religion focusses on source vigilance. This difference is due, in turn, to the function of religious claims not being connected to their accuracy – unlike the function of scientific claims. Understanding this difference helps to understand many aspects of scientific and religious institutions.
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  8.  1
    Development and Validation of a Porous Theory of Mind Scale.Michiel van Elk, David Maij & Bastiaan Rutjens - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):41-65.
    We report the results of an empirical investigation of the extent to which supernatural believers endorse a porous conception of the mind, i.e., the belief that one’s thoughts can be directly perceived by others. We developed a porous theory of mind scale, tested its factor structure by using both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, and showed its relation with supernatural beliefs in three studies in the Netherlands and one study with North-American participants. We found that endorsement of a PToM is (...)
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  9.  2
    Review: ‘Minds Make Societies’. [REVIEW]Hans Van Eyghen - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):155-158.
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