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  1. Reflexive policies and the complex socio-ecological systems of the upland landscapes in Indonesia.Sacha Amaruzaman, Douglas K. Bardsley & Randy Stringer - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):683-700.
    Well-intended natural resource policies that ignore the complexity of socio-ecological systems too often threaten local values and opportunities for sustainable development. Upland areas throughout Indonesia provide examples of complex socio-ecological systems experiencing rapid socio-economic and environmental transformations in response to interactions between development policies and local agendas. Broad natural resource policies influence socio-ecological systems in different ways. In some cases, there are converging national and local goals, while in others the goals of national policy conflict with local aspirations. This study (...)
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  2.  2
    Does direct farm marketing fulfill its promises? analyzing job satisfaction among direct-market farmers in Canada.Stevens Azima & Patrick Mundler - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):791-807.
    Short food supply chains have become the focus of considerable research in the last two decades. However, studies so far remain highly localized, and claims about the economic and social advantages of such channels for farmers are not backed by large-scale empirical evidence. Using a web survey of 613 direct-market farmers across Canada, this article explores the potential economic and social benefits that farmers derive from participating in short food supply chains. We used multivariate analysis to test whether a farmer’s (...)
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  3.  4
    SNAP, campus food insecurity, and the politics of deservingness.Maggie Dickinson - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):605-616.
    Many low-income college students are barred from food assistance for no reason other than the fact that they are pursuing a college education. Based on 22 interviews that capture the experiences of food insecure college students as they attempt to navigate SNAP, this study shows how low enrollment in the program and food insecurity are the predictable outcomes of policy decisions intended to restrict access to both free public higher education and public assistance in the 1980’s and 1990’s and were (...)
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  4.  1
    Raj Patel: Stuffed and starved: the hidden battle for the world food system: Melville House, Brooklyn, New York, 2012, 432 pp, ISBN 978-1-61219-127-0.Kelley R. Gallop - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):841-842.
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  5.  2
    Examining farmers’ adoption of nutrient management best management practices: a social cognitive framework.Lijing Gao & J. Arbuckle - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):535-553.
    The Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy aims to reduce nutrient loads in waterways from nonpoint sources such as farm fields. Farmers’ voluntary adoption of soil and water conservation practices is crucial for achieving NRS goals. Although the Iowa NRS has been active since 2013, farmer participation and net pollutant reductions have been insufficient. Therefore, continued efforts to understand the motivations and barriers that underlie farmers’ conservation actions in a comprehensive and integrated manner are needed to improve outreach strategies, and research examining (...)
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  6.  2
    Development through commodification: exploring apple commodity production as pesticide promotion in the High Atlas.Zachary A. Goldberg - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):663-682.
    Global development initiatives frequently promote agricultural commodity chain projects to improve livelihoods. In Morocco, development projects, including the Plan Maroc Vert, have promoted apple production in rural regions of the country. In order to access domestic markets, these new apple producers often use pesticides to meet market standards. Through situated ethnographic inquiry and commodity chain analysis, using a combination of surveys and interviews with apple wholesalers, government officials, along with farmers, this paper works to critique the PMV’s development approach that (...)
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  7.  4
    Transforming landscapes and mindscapes through regenerative agriculture.Ethan Gordon, Federico Davila & Chris Riedy - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):809-826.
    Agriculture occupies 38% of the planet’s terrestrial surface, using 70% of freshwater resources. Its modern practice is dominated by an industrial–productivist discourse, which has contributed to the simplification and degradation of human and ecological systems. As such, agricultural transformation is essential for creating more sustainable food systems. This paper focuses on discursive change. A prominent discursive alternative to industrial–productivist agriculture is regenerative agriculture. Regenerative discourses are emergent, radically evolving and diverse. It is unclear whether they have the potential to generate (...)
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  8.  1
    Collaborative research as boundary work: learning between rice growers and conservation professionals to support habitat conservation on private lands.Erin Hardie Hale, Christopher C. Jadallah & Heidi L. Ballard - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):715-731.
    Multi-stakeholder initiatives for biodiversity conservation on working landscapes often necessitate strategies to facilitate learning in order to foster successful collaboration. To investigate the learning processes that both undergird and result from collaborative efforts, this case study employs the concept of boundary work as a lens to examine learning between rice growers and conservation professionals in California’s Central Valley, who were engaged in a collaborative research project focused on migratory bird conservation. Through analysis of workshop observations, project documents, and interviews with (...)
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  9.  2
    Discourses of sustainability and imperial modes of food provision: agri-food-businesses and consumers in Germany.Steffen Hirth, Theresa Bürstmayr & Anke Strüver - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):573-588.
    It is widely accepted that overcoming the social-ecological crises we face requires major changes to the food system. However, opinions diverge on the question whether those ‘great efforts’ towards sustainability require systemic changes or merely systematic ones. Drawing upon Brand and Wissen’s concept of “imperial modes of living”, we ask whether the lively debates about sustainability and ‘ethical’ consumption among producers and consumers in Germany are far reaching enough to sufficiently reduce the imperial weight on the environment and other human (...)
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  10.  1
    Food Sovereignty and Sustainability Mid-Pandemic: How Michigan’s Experience of Covid-19 Highlights Chasms in the Food System.Sarah King, Amy McFarland & Jody Vogelzang - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):827-838.
    This paper offers observations on people’s lived experience of the food system in Michigan during the early Covid-19 pandemic as an initial critical foray into the everyday pandemic food world. The Covid-19 crisis illuminates a myriad of adaptive food behaviors, as people struggle to address their destabilized lives, including the casual acknowledgement of the pandemic, then anxiety of the unknown, the subsequent new dependency, and the possible emergence of a new normal. The pandemic makes the injustices inherent in the food (...)
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  11.  1
    Colin Ray Anderson, Janneke Bruil, M. Jahi Chappell, Csilla Kiss, Michel Patrick Pimbert: Agroecology now! Transformations towards more just and sustainable food systems: Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, Switzerland, 2021, 199 pp, ISBN 978-3-030-61314-3 (book), ISBN 978-3-030-61315-0.Rafael Cavalcanti Lembi - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):839-840.
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  12.  2
    Cultural biodiversity unpacked, separating discourse from practice.Mariagiulia Mariani, Claire Cerdan & Iuri Peri - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):773-789.
    In this article, we question to what extent origin-food labels, namely Geographical Indications and Slow Food Presidia, may effectively account for cultural biodiversity. Building on Foucault’s discourse theory, we question how the Slow Food movement and GI promoters have developed their own discourse and practice on CB, how these discourses contrast, and how they inform projects. Focusing on the practices to cultivate the microbiological life of three origin labeled cheeses, we have revealed the gap between these institutional discourses and what (...)
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  13.  6
    Narrating agricultural resilience after Hurricane María: how smallholder farmers in Puerto Rico leverage self-sufficiency and collaborative agency in a climate-vulnerable food system.Abrania Marrero, Andrea Lόpez-Cepero, Ramón Borges-Méndez & Josiemer Mattei - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):555-571.
    Climate change is a threat to food system stability, with small islands particularly vulnerable to extreme weather events. In Puerto Rico, a diminished agricultural sector and resulting food import dependence have been implicated in reduced diet quality, rural impoverishment, and periodic food insecurity during natural disasters. In contrast, smallholder farmers in Puerto Rico serve as cultural emblems of self-sufficient food production, providing fresh foods to local communities in an informal economy and leveraging traditional knowledge systems to manage varying ecological and (...)
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  14.  1
    Richard A. Sikora, Eugene R. Terry, Paul L. G. Vlek and Joyce Chitja (eds): Transforming agriculture in southern Africa: Constraints, technologies, policies and processes: Routledge Press, New York, USA, 2020, 348 pp, ISBN 9781032083926. [REVIEW]Eliaza Mkuna - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):843-844.
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  15.  5
    Can Agroecology and CRISPR Mix? The Politics of Complementarity and Moving Toward Technology Sovereignty.Maywa Montenegro de Wit - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):733-755.
    Can gene editing and agroecology be complementary? Various formulations of this question now animate debates over the future of food systems, including in the UN Committee on World Food Security and at the UN Food Systems Summit. Previous analyses have discussed the risks of gene editing for agroecosystems, smallholders, and the concentration of wealth by and for agro-industry. This paper takes a different approach, unpacking the epistemic, socioeconomic, and ontological politics inherent in complementarity. I ask: How is complementarity understood? Who (...)
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  16.  1
    Digesting agriculture development: nutrition-oriented development and the political ecology of rice–body relations in India.Carly E. Nichols - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):757-771.
    Nutrition-sensitive agriculture has emerged as a major development paradigm that works to diversify crops and diets throughout the Global South in order to improve nutritional outcomes. Drawing on a conceptual framework from political ecologies of health that looks at political economic factors, social discourse, and embodied, material experiences of food, I analyze qualitative and ethnographic data from an integrated NSA intervention in Madhya Pradesh and Jharkhand, India. The analysis shows that while embodied experiences of differing rice varieties were central to (...)
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  17.  3
    Forging just dietary futures: bringing mainstream and critical nutrition into conversation.Carly Nichols, Halie Kampman & Mara van den Bold - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):633-644.
    Despite decades of action to reduce global malnutrition, rates of undernutrition remain stubbornly high and rates of overweight, obesity and chronic disease are simultaneously on the rise. Moreover, while volumes of robust research on causes and solutions to malnutrition have been published, and calls for interdisciplinarity are on the rise, researchers taking different epistemological and methodological choices have largely remained disciplinarily siloed. This paper works to open a scholarly conversation between “mainstream” public health nutrition and “critical” nutrition studies. While critical (...)
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  18. Social norms and perceptions drive women’s participation in agricultural decisions in West Java, Indonesia.Sara Ratna Qanti, Alexandra Peralta & Di Zeng - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):645-662.
    Increasing women’s participation in intrahousehold decision-making has been linked with increased agricultural productivity and economic development. Existing studies focus on identifying the decision-maker and exploring factors affecting women’s participation, yet the context in which households make decisions is generally ignored. This paper narrows this gap by investigating perceptions of women's participation and the roles of social norms in agricultural decision-making. It specifically applies a fine-scale quantitative responses tool and constructs a women’s participation index to measure men’s and women’s perceptions regarding (...)
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  19. Can agriculture and conservation be compatible in a coastal wetland? Balancing stakeholders’ narratives and interactions in the management of El Hondo Natural Park, Spain.Sandra Ricart & Antonio M. Rico-Amorós - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):589-604.
    Coastal wetlands are among the most productive and valuable ecosystems worldwide, although one of the main factors affecting their survival is the coexistence between agriculture and conservation. This paper analyses the complex balance between agriculture and conservation coexistence in El Hondo Natural Park coastal wetland by examining stakeholders’ narratives, perceptions, and interactions. The aim is to highlight the concurrence between socio-economic progress and socio-environmental justice perspectives by identifying those driving factors motivating stakeholders’ conflicts while expanding stakeholders’ behaviour and interaction when (...)
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  20.  2
    Strategic framing of genome editing in agriculture: an analysis of the debate in Germany in the run-up to the European Court of Justice ruling.Robin Siebert, Christian Herzig & Marc Birringer - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):617-632.
    New techniques in genome editing have led to a controversial debate about the opportunities and uncertainties they present for agricultural food production and consumption. In July 2018, the Court of Justice of the European Union defined genome editing as a new process of mutagenesis, which implies that the resulting organisms count as genetically modified and are subject, in principle, to the obligations of EU Directive 2001/18/EG. This paper examines how key protagonists from academia, politics, and the economy strategically framed the (...)
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  21.  4
    The agroecological transition in Senegal: transnational links and uneven empowerment.Sébastien Boillat, Raphaël Belmin & Patrick Bottazzi - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):281-300.
    Senegal is among the few African countries that counts with an important agroecological movement. This movement is strongly backed up by a network of transnational partnerships and has recently matured into an advocacy coalition that promotes an agroecological transition at national scale. In this article, we investigate the role of transnational links on the empowerment potential of agroecology. Combining the multi-level perspective of socio-technical transitions and Bourdieu’s theory of practices, we conceptualize the agroecological network as a niche shaped by the (...)
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  22.  1
    Pathways towards coexistence with large carnivores in production systems.L. Boronyak, B. Jacobs, A. Wallach, J. McManus, S. Stone, S. Stevenson, B. Smuts & H. Zaranek - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):47-64.
    Coexistence between livestock grazing and carnivores in rangelands is a major challenge in terms of sustainable agriculture, animal welfare, species conservation and ecosystem function. Many effective non-lethal tools exist to protect livestock from predation, yet their adoption remains limited. Using a social-ecological transformations framework, we present two qualitative models that depict transformative change in rangelands grazing. Developed through participatory processes with stakeholders from South Africa and the United States of America, the models articulate drivers of change and the essential pathways (...)
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  23.  4
    Behind the scenes of a learning agri-food value chain: lessons from action research.Charis Linda Braun, Vera Bitsch & Anna Maria Häring - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):119-134.
    The development of sustainable agri-food systems requires not only new academic knowledge, but also concrete social and organizational change in practice. This article reflects on the action research process that supported and explored the learning process in an emerging agri-food value chain in the Berlin-Brandenburg region in eastern Germany. The action research study involved value chain actors, academic researchers, and process facilitators in a learning network. By framing the network’s learning and problem solving processes in concepts of organizational learning, lessons (...)
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  24.  2
    Citizen views on genome editing: effects of species and purpose.Gesa Busch, Erin Ryan, Marina A. G. von Keyserlingk & Daniel M. Weary - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):151-164.
    Public opinion can affect the adoption of genome editing technologies. In food production, genome editing can be applied to a wide range of applications, in different species and with different purposes. This study analyzed how the public responds to five different applications of genome editing, varying the species involved and the proposed purpose of the modification. Three of the applications described the introduction of disease resistance within different species, and two targeted product quality and quantity in cattle. Online surveys in (...)
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  25.  5
    Cacao cultivation as a livelihood strategy: contributions to the well-being of Colombian rural households.Héctor Eduardo Hernández-Núñez, Isabel Gutiérrez-Montes, Angie Paola Bernal-Núñez, Gustavo Adolfo Gutiérrez-García, Juan Carlos Suárez, Fernando Casanoves & Cornelia Butler Flora - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):201-216.
    Cacao cultivation is one of the most important livelihoods for rural households in Colombia, where it is promoted as a substitute for the illegal cultivation of coca. To strengthen Colombian cacao farming, it is important to understand the livelihood strategies associated with cacao cultivation and the impact of these different strategies on the well-being of Colombian rural households. We analyzed the impact of cacao cultivation on the livelihood strategies and well-being of rural households in western Colombia. Research with 92 rural (...)
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  26.  2
    Alex Blanchette: Porkopolis: American animality, standardized life, and the factory farm.Michaela Hoffelmeyer - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):497-498.
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  27.  7
    Seeking justice, eating toxics: overlooked contaminants in urban community gardens.Melanie Malone - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):165-184.
    Over the past several decades, urban community gardens have arisen in diverse and economically compromised neighborhoods across the U.S. as part of multiple environmental justice efforts. Urban community gardens have enabled users to mitigate the effects of many environmental injustices such as the impact of food deserts, nutrient poor food found at convenience stores, and pesticide laden grocery items. While these benefits have promulgated across the U.S., community gardens are also well known to be located in historically contaminated locations in (...)
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  28.  3
    Searching for the plot: narrative self-making and urban agriculture during the economic crisis in Slovenia.Petra Matijevic - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):301-314.
    Analyses of household urban agriculture have demonstrated a wealth of personal, economic, social, moral or political uses for self-provisioned food, yet have often understood the practice itself as merely a production process. This ‘means-to-an-end’ perspective is especially pronounced in studies of locations undergoing economic hardship. Urban gardening in postsocialist Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union has been framed as an element of an informal economy, enabling household savings, access to informal networks and avoidance of industrial goods deemed (...)
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  29.  1
    AFHVS 2021 Presidential Address: critical praxis and the social imaginary for food systems transformation.Kim L. Niewolny - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):1-4.
    In this 2021 AFHVS Presidential Address, Kim Niewolny provides a brief foray into the onto-epistemic framing of critical praxis for sustainable food systems transformation. Niewolny proposes we engage in the creative entanglement of critical praxis and the social imaginary to “unthink” the orthodoxies that govern our ideas of the possible. She offers several possibilities as pathways toward a food system that embodies health equity, ecological justice, land sovereignty, and human rights, including: agroecological research and movement building; food, farm, and health (...)
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  30.  4
    Who is ruining farmers markets? Crowds, fraud, and the fantasy of “real food”.Sang-Hyoun Pahk - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):19-31.
    Critical food scholars have long noted that much of local food discourse in the US is underwritten by a deeply regressive agrarian imaginary that valorizes “small family farms” while erasing historical legacies of racism. In this paper, I examine one influential expression of the agrarian imaginary that I call the fantasy of “real food,” and illustrate how that discourse contributes to ongoing exclusions in farmers markets. Drawing on Lacanian psychoanalysis, I explain how the fantasy of real food positions white middle-class (...)
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  31.  5
    Cultivating health: diabetes resilience through neo-traditional farming in Mopan Maya communities of Belize.Michelle Schmidt - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):269-279.
    My research explores Maya perspectives on neo-traditional farming as a source of metabolic health and resilience to the global epidemic of type-two diabetes. This article is based on long-term ethnographic research and interviews in Maya Mountains Reservation communities in southern Belize, an area with low diabetes prevalence relative to national and global populations. Research participants see lower rates of diabetes in the MMR as the result of neo-traditional peasant and subsistence farming on ancestral lands. Good metabolic health represents the embodiment (...)
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  32.  4
    The embodied precarity of year-round agricultural work: health and safety risks among Latino/a immigrant dairy farmworkers in New York.Kathleen Sexsmith - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):357-370.
    This paper analyzes how industrial agricultural production and an exclusionary immigration regime produce an embodied form of precarity among an undocumented immigrant labor force in the New York dairy industry, a much-celebrated engine of rural economic growth. In this industry, immigrant workers settle for years at a time, forming ethnic enclaves from which employers source workers for low-wage, exhausting, dangerous, year-round jobs. While much of the literature on migrant worker precarity has focused on temporary, insecure, flexible, and informal workers, this (...)
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  33.  1
    A Transdisciplinary Study of Agroecological Niches: Understanding Sustainability Transitions in Vineyards.Naama Teschner & Daniel E. Orenstein - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):33-45.
    Despite a widely agreed necessity for agroecological transition, there are various substantial constraints that hinder the adoption of alternative, more sustainable, practices. We employ the niche management concept to examine the initial phases of transition in the local wine-growing niche in Israel, or specifically, the replacement of herbicides with the use of cover-crops combined with the practice of mowing of herbaceous growth using specialized trimming machines. Our goal is to uncover the triggers, drivers and agents of change in farming practices (...)
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  34. Seeing the Workers for the Trees: Exalted and Devalued Manual Labour in the Pacific Northwest Craft Cider Industry.Anelyse M. Weiler - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):65-78.
    Craft food and beverage makers regularly emphasize transparency about the ethical, sustainable sourcing of their ingredients and the human labour underpinning their production, all of which helps elevate the status of their products and occupational communities. Yet, as with other niche ethical consumption markets, craft industries continue to rely on employment conditions for agricultural workers that reproduce inequalities of race, class, and citizenship in the dominant food system. This paper interrogates the contradiction between the exaltation of craft cidermakers’ labour and (...)
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  35.  1
    Anitra Nelson and Ferne Edwards (Eds.): Food for degrowth: perspectives and practices.Kerry Woodward - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):499-500.
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