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  1.  1
    Perceived Stress as a Mediator Between Social Support, Religiosity, and Flourishing Among Older Adults.Abbas Abdollahi, Simin Hosseinian, Hassan Sadeghi & Tengku Aizan Hamid - 2018 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 40 (1):80-103.
    _ Source: _Volume 40, Issue 1, pp 80 - 103 This study was designed to examine the relationships between social support, perceived stress, religiosity, and flourishing and to test the mediating role of perceived stress in the relationships between social support and religiosity with flourishing. This study also examines the moderating roles of religiosity and gender in the relationship between social support and flourishing among 2301 Malaysian older adults. Structural Equation Modelling showed that older adults with high levels of social (...)
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  2.  2
    A Russian Adaptation of the Multidimensional Inventory for Religious/Spiritual Well-Being.V. A. Agarkov, Y. I. Alexandrov, S. A. Bronfman, A. M. Chernenko, H. P. Kapfhammer & H.-F. Unterrainer - 2018 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 40 (1):104-115.
    _ Source: _Volume 40, Issue 1, pp 104 - 115 It is intended in this study to present initial reliability and validity data for the Russian adaptation of the Multidimensional Inventory of Religious/Spiritual Well-being, as being related to personality factors and psychopathology. Therefore, the first version of the MI-RSWB-R was applied to a sample of 192 non-clinical subjects, together with the NEO Five Factor Inventory and the Symptom-Check-List. The original six-factor structure of the scale could be replicated for the MI-RSWB-R, (...)
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  3.  5
    Religion and Subjective Well-Being in Chinese College Students: Does Meaningfulness Matter?Yanfei Hou, Xiangang Feng, Xueling Yang, Zicong Yang, Xiaoyuan Zhang & Harold G. Koenig - 2018 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 40 (1):60-79.
    _ Source: _Volume 40, Issue 1, pp 60 - 79 Studies from the West have reported a positive relationship between religion and mental health, and yet research on the relationship between religiosity and well-being among Chinese is rare. The present study investigated this relationship in a representative sample of Chinese college students. From a total sample of 11139 college students in 16 universities nationwide, 1418 students with self-reported religious beliefs were selected. We assessed religiosity, subjective well-being, psychological distress, and meaning (...)
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  4.  1
    Explaining Death by Tornado: Religiosity and the God-Serving Bias.Heidi R. Riggio, Joshua Uhalt, Brigitte K. Matthies, Theresa Harvey, Nya Lowden & Victoria Umana - 2018 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 40 (1):32-59.
    _ Source: _Page Count 28 Two self-report experiments examined how religiosity affects attributions made for the outcome of a tornado. Undergraduate students and online adults read a fictional vignette about a tornado that hits a small town in the United States. The townspeople met at church and prayed or prepared emergency shelters for three days before the tornado; either no one died or over 200 people died from the tornado. Participants made attributions of cause to God, prayer, faith, and worship. (...)
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  5.  3
    Rethinking Autism, Theism, and Atheism.Ingela Visuri - 2018 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 40 (1):1-31.
    _ Source: _Volume 40, Issue 1, pp 1 - 31 This anthropologically informed study explores descriptions of communication with invisible, superhuman agents in high functioning young adults on the autism spectrum. Based on material from interviews, two hypotheses are formulated. First, autistic individuals may experience communication with bodiless agents as less complex than interaction with peers, since it is unrestricted by multisensory input, such as body language, facial expressions, and intonation. Second, descriptions of how participants absorb into “imaginary realities” suggest (...)
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