Year:

  1.  1
    An Actual Advance in Advance Directives: Moving From Patient Choices to Patient Voices in Advance Care Planning.Virginia L. Bartlett & Stuart G. Finder - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):21-36.
    Since the concept of the living wills emerged nearly 50 years ago, there have been practical challenges in translating the concept of an advance directive into documents that are clinically useful across various healthcare settings and among different patient populations and cultures. Especially, challenging has been the reliance in most ADs on pre-selected “choices” about specific interventions which either revolve around broad themes or whether or not to utilize particular interventions, both of which about most laypersons know little and, more (...)
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  2.  1
    Using Movie Clips to Promote Reflective Practice: A Creative Approach for Teaching Ethics.Pablo González Blasco, Graziela Moreto & Leo Pessini - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):75-85.
    To teach ethics implies setting rules, guidelines, and rational decision-making but it also requires creativity and acknowledgement of the affective aspects of our decision-making processes. Usually, ethical inquiries become involved in emotions that cannot be ignored but included in the learning process. The authors relate their experience with a pedagogic model involving film clips to prompt and frame discussions that might foster a more holistic approach to ethics education. Teaching with movies is also an innovative method for promoting the sort (...)
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  3. How Stigma Distorts Justice: The Exile and Isolation of Leprosy Patients in Hawai'i.Alexander T. M. Cheung - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):53-66.
    Leprosy has taken on many names throughout human history. But none of its nomenclature has adequately captured the essence of what it has historically meant to live with the disease like the Hawaiian term ma`i ho`oka`awale, or “the separating sickness.” The appropriateness of this term is twofold: on the one hand, it accurately reflects the physical isolation imposed on leprosy patients as a result of stigmatization and quarantine policies; on the other, it seems fitting to use the language of the (...)
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  4. Considerations for Introducing Legislation on Advance Decisions in Malaysia.Mark Tan Kiak Min - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):87-92.
    Despite significant advances in medicine, death remains a certainty for every living human being. End-of-life care decision-making is not made easier in a multi-cultural and multi-religious society like Malaysia. As such, planning for one's death by making Advance Decisions can be immensely valuable as it can help healthcare providers in Malaysia to understand better the preferences and wishes of their patients. However, compared to other countries, there is currently no specific legislation on any form of Advance Decisions in Malaysia despite (...)
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  5. A Doctor in the House: Ethical and Practical Issues When Doctors Treat Themsleves and Those They Are Close To.Kanny Ooi - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):3-19.
    Having a doctor in the family is often seen as beneficial as there is easy access to medical advice and care. It is common for doctors to treat themselves and those they are close to, and some doctors consider this their prerogative. However, there are pitfalls. Primarily, there is a risk of compromising clinical judgement and objectivity when doctors self-treat and treat those they have a close relationship with. This could lead to treating problems beyond the doctor’s competence—in some instances, (...)
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  6.  11
    Presenters or Patients? A Crucial Distinction in Individual Health Assessments.G. Owen Schaefer - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):67-73.
    Individual health assessments (IHAs) for asymptomatic individuals provide a challenge to traditional distinctions between patient care and non-medical practice. They may involve undue radiation exposure, lead to false positives, and involve high out-of-pocket costs for recipients. A recent paper (Journal of the American College of Radiology 13(12): 1447–1457.e1, 2016) has criticised the use of IHAs and argued that recipients should be classified as ‘presenters’, not ‘patients’, to distinguish it from regular medical care. I critique this classificatory move, on two grounds: (...)
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  7. Jonsen's Four Topics Approach as a Framework for Clinical Ethics Consultation.Hui Jin Toh, James Alvin Low, Zhen Yu Lim, Yvonne Lim, Shahla Siddiqui & Lawrence Tan - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):37-51.
    This was an in-depth qualitative study that looked at the reasons patients were referred to the Clinical Ethics Committee of an acute hospital in Singapore and explore how the CEC approached cases referred. Jonsen’s four topics approach was applied in the deliberative process for all cases. A comprehensive review of the case records of 28 patients referred consecutively to the CEC from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014 was conducted. Data and information was collated from the referral forms, patient (...)
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  8. Use of the Welfare-Based Model in the Application of Palliative Sedation.Su Yan Yap - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):93-101.
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