Asian Bioethics Review

ISSNs: 1793-8759, 1793-9453

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  1.  5
    The Fourth Industrial Revolution: Its Impact on Artificial Intelligence and Medicine in Developing Countries.Thalia Arawi, Joseph El Bachour & Tala El Khansa - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):513-526.
    Artificial intelligence (AI) is the ability of a digital computer or computer-controlled robot to perform tasks commonly associated with intelligent beings. Artificial intelligence can be both a blessing and a curse, and potentially a double-edged sword if not carefully wielded. While it holds massive potential benefits to humans—particularly in healthcare by assisting in treatment of diseases, surgeries, record keeping, and easing the lives of both patients and doctors, its misuse has potential for harm through impact of biases, unemployment, breaches of (...)
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  2.  1
    Scoping Review Shows the Dynamics and Complexities Inherent to the Notion of “Responsibility” in Artificial Intelligence within the Healthcare Context.Sarah Bouhouita-Guermech & Hazar Haidar - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):315-344.
    The increasing integration of artificial intelligence (AI) in healthcare presents a host of ethical, legal, social, and political challenges involving various stakeholders. These challenges prompt various studies proposing frameworks and guidelines to tackle these issues, emphasizing distinct phases of AI development, deployment, and oversight. As a result, the notion of responsible AI has become widespread, incorporating ethical principles such as transparency, fairness, responsibility, and privacy. This paper explores the existing literature on AI use in healthcare to examine how it addresses, (...)
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  3.  2
    Leonardo D. de Castro, 1952–2024.Alastair V. Campbell - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):313-314.
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  4.  6
    Mapping the Apps: Ethical and Legal Issues with Crowdsourced Smartphone Data using mHealth Applications.Nada Farag, Alycia Noë, Dimitri Patrinos & Ma’N. H. Zawati - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):437-470.
    More than 5 billion people in the world own a smartphone. More than half of these have been used to collect and process health-related data. As such, the existing volume of potentially exploitable health data is unprecedentedly large and growing rapidly. Mobile health applications (apps) on smartphones are some of the worst offenders and are increasingly being used for gathering and exchanging significant amounts of personal health data from the public. This data is often utilized for health research purposes and (...)
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  5.  7
    Navigating the Landscape of Digital Twins in Medicine: A Relational Bioethical Inquiry.Brandon Ferlito, Michiel De Proost & Seppe Segers - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):471-481.
    This perspective article explores the use of digital twins (DTs) in medicine, highlighting its capacity to simulate risks and personalize treatments while examining the emerging bioethical concerns. Central concerns include power dynamics, exclusion, and misrepresentation. We propose adopting a relational bioethical approach that advocates for a comprehensive assessment of DTs in medicine, extending beyond individual interactions to consider broader structural relations and varying levels of access to power. This can be achieved through two key relational recommendations: acknowledging the impact of (...)
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  6.  2
    Governance of Medical AI.Calvin W. L. Ho & Karel Caals - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):303-305.
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  7.  2
    How the EU AI Act Seeks to Establish an Epistemic Environment of Trust.Calvin Wai-Loon Ho & Karel Caals - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):345-372.
    With focus on the development and use of artificial intelligence (AI) systems in the digital health context, we consider the following questions: How does the European Union (EU) seek to facilitate the development and uptake of trustworthy AI systems through the AI Act? What does trustworthiness and trust mean in the AI Act, and how are they linked to some of the ongoing discussions of these terms in bioethics, law, and philosophy? What are the normative components of trustworthiness? And how (...)
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  8.  7
    Secondary Use of Health Data for Medical AI: A Cross-Regional Examination of Taiwan and the EU.Chih-Hsing Ho - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):407-422.
    This paper conducts a comparative analysis of data governance mechanisms concerning the secondary use of health data in Taiwan and the European Union (EU). Both regions have adopted distinctive approaches and regulations for utilizing health data beyond primary care, encompassing areas such as medical research and healthcare system enhancement. Through an examination of these models, this study seeks to elucidate the strategies, frameworks, and legal structures employed by Taiwan and the EU to strike a delicate balance between the imperative of (...)
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  9.  2
    The Environmental Costs of Artificial Intelligence for Healthcare.Amelia Katirai - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):527-538.
    Healthcare has emerged as a key setting where expectations are rising for the potential benefits of artificial intelligence (AI), encompassing a range of technologies of varying utility and benefit. This paper argues that, even as the development of AI for healthcare has been pushed forward by a range of public and private actors, insufficient attention has been paid to a key contradiction at the center of AI for healthcare: that its pursuit to improve health is necessarily accompanied by environmental costs (...)
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  10.  2
    Moving beyond Technical Issues to Stakeholder Involvement: Key Areas for Consideration in the Development of Human-Centred and Trusted AI in Healthcare.Jane Kaye, Nisha Shah, Atsushi Kogetsu, Sarah Coy, Amelia Katirai, Machie Kuroda, Yan Li, Kazuto Kato & Beverley Anne Yamamoto - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):501-511.
    Discussion around the increasing use of AI in healthcare tends to focus on the technical aspects of the technology rather than the socio-technical issues associated with implementation. In this paper, we argue for the development of a sustained societal dialogue between stakeholders around the use of AI in healthcare. We contend that a more human-centred approach to AI implementation in healthcare is needed which is inclusive of the views of a range of stakeholders. We identify four key areas to support (...)
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  11.  13
    Developing a Framework for Self-regulatory Governance in Healthcare AI Research: Insights from South Korea.Junhewk Kim, So Yoon Kim, Eun-Ae Kim, Jin-Ah Sim, Yuri Lee & Hannah Kim - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):391-406.
    This paper elucidates and rationalizes the ethical governance system for healthcare AI research, as outlined in the ‘Research Ethics Guidelines for AI Researchers in Healthcare’ published by the South Korean government in August 2023. In developing the guidelines, a four-phase clinical trial process was expanded to six stages for healthcare AI research: preliminary ethics review (stage 1); creating datasets (stage 2); model development (stage 3); training, validation, and evaluation (stage 4); application (stage 5); and post-deployment monitoring (stage 6). Researchers identified (...)
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  12.  2
    Existing and Emerging Capabilities in the Governance of Medical AI.Gilberto K. K. Leung, Yuechan Song & Calvin W. L. Ho - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):307-311.
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  13.  6
    Using Artificial Intelligence in Patient Care—Some Considerations for Doctors and Medical Regulators.Kanny Ooi - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):483-499.
    This paper discusses the key role medical regulators have in setting standards for doctors who use artificial intelligence (AI) in patient care. Given their mandate to protect public health and safety, it is incumbent on regulators to guide the profession on emerging and vexed areas of practice such as AI. However, formulating effective and robust guidance in a novel field is challenging particularly as regulators are navigating unfamiliar territory. As such, regulators themselves will need to understand what AI is and (...)
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  14. Regulating AI-Based Medical Devices in Saudi Arabia: New Legal Paradigms in an Evolving Global Legal Order.Barry Solaiman - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):373-389.
    This paper examines the Saudi Food and Drug Authority’s (SFDA) Guidance on Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) technologies based Medical Devices (the MDS-G010). The SFDA has pioneered binding requirements designed for manufacturers to obtain Medical Device Marketing Authorization. The regulation of AI in health is at an early stage worldwide. Therefore, it is critical to examine the scope and nature of the MDS-G010, its influences, and its future directions. It is argued that the guidance is a patchwork of (...)
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  15.  3
    Artificial Intelligence Needs Data: Challenges Accessing Italian Databases to Train AI.Ciara Staunton, Roberta Biasiotto, Katharina Tschigg & Deborah Mascalzoni - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):423-435.
    Population biobanks are an increasingly important infrastructure to support research and will be a much-needed resource in the delivery of personalised medicine. Artificial intelligence (AI) systems can process and cross-link very large amounts of data quickly and be used not only for improving research power but also for helping with complex diagnosis and prediction of diseases based on health profiles. AI, therefore, potentially has a critical role to play in personalised medicine, and biobanks can provide a lot of the necessary (...)
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  16.  20
    A Dialogue between Hindu and Catholic Perspectives in Taking Care of Newborns at their End-of-Life.Giulia Adele Dinicola - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (2):233-248.
    Hinduism is considered one of the most ancient religions in the world. Although the technological innovation of modernization has undermined the reliance on their traditions, Hindus may still rely on Hindu Scripture when making decisions. From their standpoint, contrary to Western medicine, human lives cannot be reduced to statistical and empirical facts. They focus more on preserving the spirit, rather than considering survival as one of the goals of medicine. Consequently, when a preterm infant is born, Hindu parents might struggle (...)
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  17.  47
    A Tempered Rationalism for a Tempered Yuck Factor—Using Disgust in Bioethics.Konstantin Eckl & Konstantin Deininger - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (2):1-20.
    When it comes to invasive manipulation of animals on the biological level, reactions of disgust are common and often influential on people’s moral judgments. As a case in point, the Belgian Blue, a breed of hyper-enhanced cattle which will serve as a case study for the present article, has historically been met with revulsion. Traditionally, in bio- and animal ethics, this ‘yuck factor,’ has been denied any productive role in proper moral justification, since rationalism is still a dominant paradigm in (...)
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  18.  6
    Support for the Right to Life among Neonatal Intensive Care Nurses in Korea.Somin Kim & Sunhee Lee - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (2):267-279.
    The increase of high-risk newborns due to societal changes has presented neonatal intensive care unit nurses with more ethical challenges and heightened their perception of neonatal palliative care. Therefore, this study was a descriptive survey exploring the perceptions of neonatal intensive care unit nurse regarding biomedical ethics and neonatal palliative care in neonatal intensive care units. The research participants were 97 neonatal intensive care unit nurses who had been directly involved with end-of-life care for high-risk babies. Data were collected from (...)
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  19.  13
    The Law and Ethics of Reproduction: Experiences and Perspectives from Asia.Graeme T. Laurie - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (2):143-147.
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  20.  12
    The Role of Male Consent in Assisted Reproductive Technology Procedures: an Examination of Japanese Court Cases.Yuko Muraoka, Minori Kokado & Kazuto Kato - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (2):165-183.
    With the development of assisted reproductive technologies, medical, ethical, legal, and social issues have arisen that did not exist when natural conception was the only means of childbirth. In Japan, men tend to believe that assisted reproductive technologies are not directly related to them, with the literature showing that men are often reluctant to be involved in fertility treatment processes. To better understand this situation, this study analyzes the role of male consent during assisted reproductive technology procedures in Japan. First, (...)
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