14 found

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  1.  1
    Conference Reports.William Brown - 2012 - Cinema 3 (1):272-283.
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  2.  3
    Existential Feelings: How Cinema Makes Us Feel Alive.Dina Mendonça - 2012 - Cinema 3:211-228.
    This paper explores the role of existential feelings in films, and the impact of theconnections between cinema and existential feelings for emotional life in general. After explaining the notion of existential feelings and illustrating them in films with Black Swan and The Help , the paper concludes that movies offer provide insights about our own existential feelings because films promote emotional awareness by the way they function as emotional laboratories. This will lead to an examination the presence and role of (...)
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  3. Círculos E Poéticas Em Filmes Literários De Fernando Lopes.Eduardo Paz Barroso - 2012 - Cinema 3:284-300.
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  4. Cinema, The Body And Embodiment.Patrícia Silveirinha Castello Branco - 2012 - Cinema 3:1-9.
     
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  5. A propos d’images : Entretien avec Marie-Jose Mondzain.Vanessa Brito - 2012 - Cinema 3:254-271.
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  6. Eija-Liisa Ahtila: The Palpable Event.Andrew Conio - 2012 - Cinema 3:124-154.
    The widely accepted reading of Eija-Liisa Ahtila’s work is that her use of multiplescreens and fragmented, multilayered, narratives of unstable subject positions and multiple assemblages of enunciation produces an embodied experience of the palpitations of time as it flows backwards and forward in heterogenic durations. It is claimed that her use of the installation form to portray this resolves the longstanding and still pressing debates about the seeming irreconcilability between the demands of the critical viewer and the seductions of the (...)
     
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  7. Upside-Down Cinema: Simulation of the Body in the Film Experience.Adriano D’Aloia - 2012 - Cinema 3:155-182.
    This essay examines the motif of the upside-down image in cinema and focuses on the perceptual and cognitive activity of the spectator. In the first part, I refer to Maurice Merleau-Ponty discussion of psychological experiments on retinal inversion and describe the dynamic disembodiment/re-embodiment as a way of providing the spectator both the thrill of unbalance and the perceptual re-orientation functional to the cognitive comprehension of the film. In the second part, I analyse the formal and stylistic modes of representation of (...)
     
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  8. Embodying Movies: Embodied Simulation and Film Studies.Vittorio Gallese & Michele Guerra - 2012 - Cinema 3:183-210.
    Recent discoveries in neuroscience, among which that of mirror neurons ,have strongly influenced the debate on spatial cognition, action, emotion andempathy, all aspects that in recent years have been deeply reconsidered within film studies. This article focuses on the role embodied simulation theory—triggered by the discovery of MNs—plays in film experience. ES has beenproposed to constitute a basic functional mechanism of humans’ brain.Because of a shared bodily representational format, we map the actions of others onto our own motor representations, as (...)
     
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  9. The Body as Interface: Ambivalent Tactility in Expanded Rube Cinema.Seung-Hoon Jeong - 2012 - Cinema 3:229-253.
    This paper addresses the issue of embodiment by looking at Rubefilms in which the maladjusted to new media, confusing reality and illusion, directly touch the screen to catch the object of desire. The shift from perception to action here signals that from transcendent to embodied spectatorship, revealing the screen as a material “interface ” that both provokes and frustrates the real contact. Defining this “ambivalent tactility” as a key aspect of interfaciality, the paper explores it in the frame of various (...)
     
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  10. Cinema of the Body: The Politics of Performativity in Lars Von Trier’s Dogville and Yorgos Lanthimo’s Dogtooth.Angelos Koutsourakis - 2012 - Cinema 3:84-108.
    Gilles Deleuze’s distinction between the “cinema of action” and “the cinema of the body” has been quite influential in contemporary studies of film performance. Deleuze analyzes the ways in which certain directors reduce their narratives to the bodies of the actors so as to disturb narrative coherence. The camera’s interaction with the body goes beyond narrative motivation and according to Deleuze, the primary concern of this type of cinema is not dramaturgical consistency, but the production of a performative excess bymeans (...)
     
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  11. The Body of Il Duce: The Myth of the Political Physicality of Mussolini in Marco Bellocchio’s Vincere.Marco Luceri - 2012 - Cinema 3:109-123.
    In 2009, Marco Bellocchio made the film Vincere, which tells the tormented relationship between Benito Mussolini and Ida Dalser. The film not only retraces Mussolini’s personal life, but also his ascent to power. In the narration of this political aspect, Bellocchio, thanks to his collaboration with the actor Filippo Timi, reinterprets and sheds new light on one of the most interesting aspects of the biography of il Duce: the importance of the mediatic use of his body as a political statement. (...)
     
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  12. Seduction Incarnate: Pre-Production Code Hollywood and Possessive Spectatorship.Ana Salzberg - 2012 - Cinema 3:39-61.
    This article considers questions of embodied visuality, sexuality, and spectatorship in the pre-Production Code filmmaking of 1920s/30s Hollywood. With Laura Mulvey’s theorization of possessive spectatorship in new media and Jennifer M. Barker’s embodied approach to early cine-eroticism providing a conceptual framework, “Seduction Incarnate” suggests that the very elements of momentum and stillness, elusiveness and control examined by these scholars are incorporated into the sensual subjectivities of pre-Code films; and through techniques like close-ups, elliptical montages, and suggestive fade-outs, these filmic bodies (...)
     
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  13. Fleshing Out the Image: Phenomenology, Pedagogy, and Derek Jarman’s Blue.Vivian Sobchack - 2012 - Cinema 3:19-38.
     
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  14. A Phenomenology Of Reciprocal Sensation In The Moving Body Experience Of Mobile Phone Films.Gavin Wilson - 2012 - Cinema 3:62-83.
    The screening of films made on mobile phones to spectators, either on a mobile phone or projected before an audience, significantly affects the materialinstrumentality of the phone film, with profound consequences for its reception and the ontological truth that results from such kinds of audience engagement.In the transformative process between the capture of real events and thereception of representational moving images by the spectator, the phone filmtransitions from a particularised kind of audio-visual artefact recording afilmmaker’s personal experience, to become the (...)
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