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  1.  2
    Fast vergessen: Die Nachwirkungen von Kierkegaards Kulturkritik im Krisendiskurs der dänischen Nachkriegszeit.Hjördis Becker-Lindenthal - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):305-327.
    The article examines the explicit and implicit role that Kierkegaard played in the cultural criticism developed in the literary circle of the Danish journal Heretica (1948 – 1954). The cultural criticism of Kierkegaard and eminent Danish post-war authors (Martin A. Hansen, Vilhem Grønbech, Bjørn Poulsen, Tage Skou-Hansen and Ole Wivel) is contextualized in the tradition of Western cultural criticism. An analysis of central concepts such as crisis, rationality, spirit and reflection as well as alienation, individuality and community, demonstrates the original (...)
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  2.  4
    Der Begriff Ernst. Zur Kritik ironischer Selbstverhältnisse bei Hegel und Kierkegaard.Sebastian Böhm - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):249-279.
    The article aims at giving an account of and comparing Hegel’s and Kierkegaard’s critique of contemporary culture by focussing on the category of seriousness. Both thinkers diagnose a general tendency of downplaying, in fact, suppressing or even abolishing consciousness of sin and a concomitant disappearance of seriousness in what they consider „the modern age of reflection.“ First, the concept of seriousness is spelled out within their respective philosophies of religion, and this in relation to the reality of sin as a (...)
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  3.  6
    Kierkegaard and the Figure of the Philistine: a Negative Way of Highlighting Existence.Jérôme Bord - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):79-98.
    In this paper, I propose a study of the figure of the philistine (Spidsborgeren) as the embodiment of spiritlessness in Kierkegaard. Indeed, although the pseudonyms aim at representing all the possibilities of existence, declining at the same time the diverse degrees of inwardness, the philistine appears throughout the whole work as the very paradigm of the lack of inwardness. While this figure stands as a kind of antipseudonym, I thus argue that it plays a decisive role in Kierkegaard, because it (...)
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  4.  5
    Is There a Suspension of Subjectivity?Mikael Brorson - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):99-113.
    This article examines the Kierkegaard reception of the Danish theologians K. Olesen Larsen and Johannes Sløk, who both understood Kierkegaard as attempting to radically subvert the freedom of the human being. Initially, I show how current Kierkegaard research on the question of subjectivity, freedom and indirect communication differs from the readings of Olesen Larsen and Sløk. Subsequently, and in contrast to this, Olesen Larsen’s somewhat ambivalent attempt to read Kierkegaard as undermining human freedom is presented. Third, I show how Sløk (...)
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  5.  7
    “Forgiveness is forgiveness:” Kierkegaard’s Spiritual Acoustics.Daniel R. Esparza - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):191-214.
    Kierkegaard’s distinction of chatter from silence gives forgiveness a linguistic spin. How can forgiveness be spoken? Is forgiveness something to be said and heard? Is saying it aloud saying too much, or too little? What is said when (and if) forgiveness is said? Should forgiveness be chatted away, or reserved in silence? For Kierkegaard, the answer(s) is (are) neither/nor: forgiveness can only be said indirectly, kept (almost) indistinguishable from resentment or indifference, as if discarded in the face of offense—if it (...)
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  6.  16
    The Call to Selfhood: Kierkegaard, Narrative Unity, and the Achievement of Personal Identity.Jacob Farris - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):115-142.
    This paper argues for a Kierkegaardian account of personal identity in dialogue with MacIntyre, Korsgaard, Frankfurt, Ricœur, and Marion. I engage with the scholarly debate on Kierkegaard’s relationship to practical and narrative accounts of the self and argue that he criticizes the ideal of self-authorship because authentic selfhood must be co-authored with others and embedded in the narrative setting and history that is provided by facticity. Moreover, this relation to facticity requires ethical commitment and existential faith. The phenomenology of the (...)
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  7.  4
    “My Dear Reader—but to Whom Am I Speaking?” Kierkegaard Read with the Rhetorical Theory of Narrative.Ville Hämäläinen - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):161-190.
    This article introduces a rhetorical theory of narrative in reading Kierkegaard, comparing Kierkegaard’s praxis to Phelan’s definition of “somebody telling somebody else that something happened on some occasion and for some purpose(s).” Use of pseudonyms problematizes “the somebody” telling and makes apparent the differing purposes of author and narrator. In the early authorship, the purpose is usually a life-view. The “something happened” may seem irrelevant in Kierkegaard, but it evokes questions of lived experience and life-view. The “occasion” for telling is (...)
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  8.  28
    ‘No One Was As Great As Abraham’: Exemplarity and the Failure of Hermeneutical Refiguration in Fear and Trembling.Jared Highlen - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):3-27.
    In this paper I put forward a new interpretation of the “Exordium” and “Eulogy for Abraham” sections in Fear and Trembling. It reads them in tension, as mutually incompatible approaches to the biblical narrative of Abraham. I argue this tension is productive insofar as it reveals and critiques the failure of each section to respond to Abraham as a religious exemplar of faith. Drawing on the work of Paul Ricœur, I argue that this failure consists in the absence of the (...)
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  9.  6
    The Hong Kong Reception of Kierkegaard: From the 1950s to the Present.Andrew Ka Pok Tam - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):329-357.
    Early in the 1950s, Kierkegaard’s philosophy had already been introduced to the academic circle of Hong Kong, which was an in-betweener between Chinese and Western cultures. Nevertheless, while Kierkegaard was frequently discussed by the Japanese philosophers of the Kyoto school, Hong Kong Chinese philosophers (remarkably New Confucians) from the 1950s to the 2010s rarely appreciate Kierkegaard’s philosophy. This paper argues that these Chinese philosophers are uninterested in Kierkegaard because their major concerns are the preservation of traditional Chinese culture in Hong (...)
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  10.  6
    Kierkegaards Begriff Angst als „gottesfürchtige Satire“.Simone Neuber - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):29-58.
    Kierkegaard՚s The Concept of Anxiety deserves to be treated as a central text on sin, but not because it introduces an ingenious intermediate psychological determination that helps to approach an explanation of the „Fall.“ Its real relevance lies in the way the text enacts the noetic effects of sin through a theoretical reflection on the possibility of sin. This essay unfolds this thesis and assigns a central hermeneutical role to Caput 4.
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  11.  4
    The Kantian Sublime Reflected in the Kierkegaardian Sublime.Mathias Parding - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):217-247.
    Occupying a seemingly minor role in the authorship of Kierkegaard, the concept of “the sublime” has not received much attention in the reception, compared to that of other more prominent concepts. This could essentially imply one of two things: either that the sublime is not an important theme for Kierkegaard, or that it is so pervasively present, that the reader does not know how to conceive it, let alone get a hold of a tangible definition of it. Proceeding from the (...)
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  12.  2
    The Young Kierkegaard as a Student of Liunge’s Kjøbenhavnsposten.Jon Stewart - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):281-301.
    Kierkegaard is well known for his quick wit and sharp polemics against his opponents. One of his favorite targets was the poet, dramatist, and philosopher, Johan Ludvig Heiberg (1791 – 1860). Perhaps the best-known element of his critique was Heiberg’s outspoken Hegelian campaign. Before Kierkegaard’s famous criticisms of Heiberg, he learned the craft of literary polemics by reading the lively discussions in the Danish journals of the time. In this article it is argued that the role of the journal Kjøbenhavnsposten (...)
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  13.  12
    Between Mood and Spirit: Kierkegaard’s Conception of Death as the Teacher of Earnestness.Michael Strawser - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):143-160.
    How are we to understand the earnest thought of death as developed in Kierkegaard’s discourse “At a Graveside”? Through a careful examination of this signed writing, I shall argue that readers nevertheless encounter an indirect, un-authorized discourse, which presents the occasion for both a variety of moods and the cultivation of spirit. The thought of death calls forth either a certain negative mood or presents a call to action for the good. However, this distinction is problematic insofar as we consider (...)
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  14.  7
    Kierkegaard: Existenzphilosoph nur im ‚Nebenberuf‘? Überlegungen im Anschluss an Jürgen Habermas.Oliver Victor - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):359-376.
    This paper discusses Habermas’s characterization of Kierkegaard as a religious author in his main profession and as an existential philosopher on the side. I would like to argue that Kierkegaard is primarily an existential philosopher, also in his function as a religious author. At first, I would like to interpret his religious authorship as a form of indirect communication, and after that I discuss indirect communication as a method of existentialism. In this way, the article aims to demonstrate that Kierkegaard (...)
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  15.  2
    Kierkegaard and Religionswissenschaft: A Source- and Reception-Historical Survey (Part 2).Eric Ziolkowski - 2023 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 28 (1):377-410.
    This second part of a two-part article (the first part of which appeared in the Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2022) surveys the varying uses made of Kierkegaard’s writings by four twentieth- and, in two of their cases, also twenty-first-century contributors to Religionswissenschaft: Joachim Wach, Mircea Eliade, Wendy Doniger, and Bruce Lincoln, all four of whom happen to have taught at the University of Chicago Divinity School. Far from being irrelevant or being regarded as a theologically-inclined persona non grata by comparatists of (...)
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