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  1.  4
    Aaron Tucker, Interfacing with the Internet in Popular Cinema.Lai-Tze Fan - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):209-213.
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  2.  2
    Billboards and Petrocultures In West Texas.Giovanni Frigo - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):67-104.
    This article explores how fossil fuels are expressed on the surface of specific media: billboards. It is based on observations made during a “scholarly” road trip to West Texas aimed at studying the protests surrounding the construction of the Trans-Pecos Pipeline. Blending travel writing with a theoretical analysis of billboards, the article investigates the philosophy behind the Shale Revolution and examines the specific petroculture of the Permian Basin. Given their necessary conciseness, clarity and effectiveness, billboards contain both straightforward messages and (...)
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  3.  2
    “Take A Good Look At It”: Seeing Postcolonial Medianatures with Karen Tei Yamashita.Walter Gordon - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):175-198.
    Plastic remains one of the most ubiquitous forms that oil takes as a mediating force in our everyday life. This article tracks the way in which this function of plastic has been obfuscated, particularly within the discursive space of academia, by way of a close reading of Karen Tei Yamashita’s 1990 novel Through the Arc of the Rain Forest. After contextualizing the author’s vision of a neoliberal media culture through a brief history of the recent disciplinary convergences of media studies, (...)
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  4.  3
    Imagine It Thick In Your Own Skin: Sculptures and a Unique Artist’s Book.Heide Hatry - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):120-137.
    In this artistic contribution, New York-based German artist Heide Hatry offers pictures of her sculpture series Imagine It Thick In Your Own Hair. According to Hatry, the project was intended to make people aware of the tragedy and motivate them to help clean up the disaster BP created in 2010 with the Deepwater Horizon spill. Hatry is best known for her body-related performances and her work employing animal flesh and organs, and cremated remains. Among her fundamental preoccupations are identity, death, (...)
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  5.  4
    Editorial Introduction | Oil and Media, Oil as Media: Mediating Petrocultures Then and Now.Jordan Kinder & Lucie Stepanik - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):i-xvi.
    In this introduction to the special issue of MediaTropes on “Oil and Media, Oil as Media,” Jordan B. Kinder and Lucie Stepanik provide an account of the stakes and consequences of approaching oil as media as they situate it within the “material turn” of media studies and the broader project energy humanities. They argue that by critically approaching oil and its infrastructures as media, the contributions that comprise this issue puts forward one way to develop an account of oil that (...)
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  6.  3
    “Our Stories About Extraction”: A Brief Interview with Elizabeth LaPensée.Elizabeth LaPensée & Jordan Kinder - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):199-208.
    In this brief interview, Jordan B. Kinder discusses Thunderbird Strike with Anishinaabe, Métis, and settler-Irish media theorist and artist Elizabeth LaPensée. Thunderbird Strike is a multiplatform, two-dimensional sidescrolling video game created by LaPensée in collaboration with Adrian Cheater and Aubrey Jane Scott, NÀHGĄ a.k.a. Casey Koyczan, and Kaitlin Rose Lenhard. The conversation is centred on the inspiration for Thunderbird Strike, its reception, and its possibilities as a pedagogical medium.
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  7.  4
    “Standing Up for Canadian Oil & Gas Families”: Tracing Gender, Family, and Work In the Alberta Petro-Economy.Alicia Massie & Emma Jackson - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):40-66.
    Drawing on the social media content of four pro-oil Facebook groups, we argue that these ‘subsidized publics’ play an increasingly critical role in facilitating oil and gas companies’ continued accumulation of fossil capital. We adopt O’Shaughnessy and Krogman’s analytical framework to reveal material-discursive contradictions obscured from view in the pages of these online groups. Through deploying gendered and familial discourses, these subsidized publics celebrate traditional gender roles, present oil as a ubiquitous and benevolent force, and blur the divide between oil (...)
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  8.  5
    Making “The Beast”: An Interview with Patrick McCurdy.Patrick McCurdy & Jordan Kinder - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):105-119.
    In this interview, Jordan B. Kinder discusses The Beast: Making a Living on a Dying Planet with Patrick McCurdy. The Beast is a 2018 graphic novel published by independent Canadian publisher Ad Astra Comix. It is the result of a collaboration between communications scholar Patrick McCurdy, writer Hugh Goldring, and artist Nicole Marie Burton. Emerging from McCurdy’s work on the MediaToil database project—a database that gathers together competing visual representations of the Athabasca Oil Sands from several stakeholders—the graphic novel addresses (...)
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  9.  2
    Roger Stahl, Through the Crosshairs: War, Visual Culture, and the Weaponized Gaze.Jessy Ohl - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):214-218.
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  10.  4
    Inscribing Interiority and Ideology: Representing the Visually Elusive in the American Petroleum Institute’s Cold War Films.Ila Tyagi - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):1-18.
    Films sponsored by the American oil industry during the Cold War often pit communism and capitalism against each other, arguing for the latter’s ideological superiority. Since abstract ideologies are difficult to represent visually, the battle takes concrete form via depictions of layers of underground rock in films like The Last Ten Feet and Destination Earth, which demonstrate how the American oil industry’s engineering ingenuity locates and extracts the precious crude oil reserves found therein. In this essay, I argue that by (...)
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  11.  7
    Beyond Doom and Gloom in Petroaesthetics: Facing Oil, Making Energy Matter.Bart Welling - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):138-174.
    This essay argues that one of the factors holding back civilization-wide transitions to renewable energy is the widespread tendency to render petroleum and other hydrocarbons abject and abstract. Fossil fuel industry representations do this by hiding the true costs of petroculture behind the virtualization Energy; environmentalist framings do it by relying too much on petroaesthetics of doom and gloom. The scarcity of representations of hydrocarbons that acknowledge both their life-giving and life-destroying properties, their powerful nonhuman agency in mediating practically every (...)
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  12.  3
    Advertising an Empire of Oil: The British Petroleum Company and the Persian Khan Exhibit of 1924–1925.Ian Wereley - 2020 - Mediatropes 7 (2):19-39.
    This article explores the publicity and advertising campaigns undertaken by the British Petroleum Company during the 1920s, focusing specifically on the Persian Khan exhibit mounted at the British Empire Exhibition of 1924–1925. Despite their rich value as primary sources, the marketing campaigns of British oil companies—and in particular of BP—have been relatively overlooked by historians. Using an energy humanities approach, the article reconstructs the Khan exhibit and its galleries, revealing an imaginary world in which oil was framed as an exotic (...)
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