27 found

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  1. Hermeneutical Realism as a Critical Theory.Dimitri Ginev - 2011 - Phainomena 79:41-58.
    e paper seeks to evaluate the critical perspective on scientism and epistemological objectivism put forward by a version of hermeneutic phenomenology. It is a version that addresses the issues of the meaningful constitution of research objects in natural-scientic research. In opposing Habermas’ quasi- transcendental epistemology of the empirico-analytical sciences, the paper offers an attempt at interpretative investigation of the formation of knowledge- guiding interests in these sciences. e possibility of a “dialogical research of nature” is scrutinized.
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  2. Heidegger’s Concept Of Fore-Structure And Textual Interpretation.Ka-Wing Leung - 2011 - Phainomena 79:23-40.
    The concept of fore-structure is central to Heidegger’s idea of interpretation. Gadamer later incorporated this concept into his own theory of philosophical hermeneutics. But there are indeed certain signifcant differences between their accounts of the fore-structure, and these differences are o ften neglected by scholars. This essay will first present Heidegger’s concept of fore-structure, and then we will demonstrate the differences between Heidegger and Gadamer. At last, we will draw out some implications of Heidegger’s concept of fore-structure to textual Interpretation.
     
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  3. The Visual Construction of Carnival Culture.Izar Lunacek - 2011 - Phainomena 79:95-108.
    The paper analyses the worldview of Carnival as described by M. M. Bakhtin, presenting it as simultaneously anti-scopic and highly visual. I.e., carnival conceives of the pictorial as the only true reality, but it does this by opposing the scopic tendency of “just looking” held by a sterile, theoretic subject: carnival pictures are to be lived, not watched. Its opposite is the metaphysical or ideological worldview whose icon is the ideal theoretician, removed from the world, ingesting it through its gaze (...)
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  4. The Education as Plastic Word.Cathrin Nielsen - 2011 - Phainomena 79:59-68.
    The article looks at the impact of “plastic words on the current debate about education by outlining the following five theses, I) the purpose of plastic words is to redefine history as a natural process, II) their essence is by nature fluid and thus an “investment in the future, III) the investment in the future is the one potential resource waiting for its call to action. This would also apply to humanity and a specific human technology. IV) Plastic words are (...)
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  5. The Body-Image as an Event: Deleuze and Vibrations of Contemporary Art.Žarko Paic - 2011 - Phainomena 79:69-93.
    Interpretation of Deleuze's antiphilosophy of immanence has the focal point in main concept of desiring-machine as construction of visual representation of contemporary art. Author try to explores why we have to do something completely radical with philosophical return to subject. e body in contemporary culture belongs to crucial social and political place without organs in technological and aesthetical sense. Deleuze antiphilosophy of immanence, as author argues, give us new approach to reinterpretation of all metaphysical history, but only if we decide (...)
     
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  6. How is Aristotle’s Conception of Physis Implicated in Husserl’s Phenomenology? – With Special Consideration Given to Husserl’s Ought Concerning Ethics.Wen-Sheng Wang - 2011 - Phainomena 79:3-12.
    This paper starts with an explanation of Aristotle’s conception of physis, namely as nature where the essence or form comes out of matter, but not, like techne, out of a cra sman’s thinking. en I try to point out how this conception is implicated in Husserl’s phenomenology. We see that Husserl’s phenomenological method lets us come back to the things themselves. We can experience them as physis. But what and how can the transcendental subjectivity, being what Husserl’s phenomenological method aims (...)
     
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  7. A Phenomenological Investigation On Einfühlung And Einsfühlung----From . Lipps, M. Scheler To E. Stein.Xin Yu - 2011 - Phainomena 79:13-22.
    From the example of the acrobat used by Lipps, Stein refuted Lipps’ concept of empathy by her own empathy dened by primordiality and non-primordiality, and then creatively dierentiated between Einfühlung and Einsfühlung. is distinction aected Scheler so much that he revised and expanded his work on sympathy. In particular, he added the fourth type of Einsfühlung in the classication of intersubjective emotional acts. But Scheler’s Einsfühlung is quite dierent from Stein’s. He took Einsfühlung as a heightened form of infection [Gefühlsansteckung]. (...)
     
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  8. Special Forms of »Freedom«. A Contribution about the History of the Supervision of the Intelligence Agencies.Gorazd Bajc - 2011 - Phainomena 76:297-310.
    e supervision of secret service has always been connected with the problem of a bigger or a smaller decit of social freedom, e.g. freedom of expression, of communication or movement. At the same time freedom itself depends, on the one hand, on the special »freedom«, the secret or intelligence agencies have claimed or gained for themselves, and, on the other, on the – more or less e³cient – systems of supervision, how to prevent misuse or at least how to mitigate (...)
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  9. Being as Letting-Be.Damir Barbaric - 2011 - Phainomena 76:149-160.
    According to Heidegger in the letting-be of Being a nullifying in the Being takes place, or, to put it more accurately: the hesitating abnegation, the withdrawal of Being. Despite the appearance of being merely negative this withdrawal in reality has the character of the origin, insofar as it gives, oers, donates being as completely dierentiated from Being, with other words: it lets it be. In his late thinking Heidegger many times and in dierent ways tried to show the originative character (...)
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  10. The Transgression of Boundaries: What Phenomenology and Modern Physics Have to Say to Each Other?Tina Bilban - 2011 - Phainomena 76:231-248.
    e accelerated development and the specialization of elds have in the last decades caused also the separation and specialization in the elds of science and philosophy. e individual philosophic systems have lost their complexity and connection with dierent layers of the life-world, and specialized themselves for special questions and problems, in much the same way as have the scientic disciplines. A renewed connection between phenomenology and physics would with an intertwining of a solid philosophic apparatus, concerned with the fundamental questions, (...)
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  11. From the Origins of the Human Rights to their Implementation.Jernej Cernic - 2011 - Phainomena 76:283-296.
    e assurance of human rights and fundamental freedoms is one of the cornerstones of a democratic society, which respects, assures and fullls constitutional commitments and obligations concerning the international law on the eld of human rights. e implementation of human rights and fundamental freedoms does not depend solely on the organs of the state, but on all of us, who must strive for their implementation in our everyday life. e present article discusses selected juridical, philosophic and normative answers regarding the (...)
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  12. What is Science and what is University?Sašo Dolenc - 2011 - Phainomena 76:249-258.
    e article addresses science and university as key institutions of society that are engaged in creating and evaluating knowledge and experts. We are trying to identify the fundamental social raison d’être of science and university. We want to know how to dene the criteria, when these two social institutions are functioning properly.
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  13. Kant’s Doctrine on Virtues and the Buddhist Practice of Exercises.Rolf Elberfeld - 2011 - Phainomena 76:203-224.
    e nal purpose of man is according to Kant the culture in terms of the cultivation of man. Kant distinguishes dierent levels of culture: culture of reason, culture of the will, culture of taste, culture of the body, etc. Without the continued cultivation of human powers, it is not possible for man to realize a moral action. How the cultivation of human powers is to be carried out in a concrete way, Kant does not say. At this point in the (...)
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  14. Being/Dispersal.Petar Jevremovic - 2011 - Phainomena 76:133-148.
    is text discusses two possible ways of confronting the question of freedom. e rst one is concerned with the relation between the subject and the Law. e second one deals with the ontological and structural presuppositions of subject’s capability for being the subject of choice. Dynamically speaking, apart from any possibility of being satised or frustrated, two referential points are being and dispersal. Being implies subject’s active homogeneity. Dispersal implies erosion of the basic structures of subjectivity. Narcissistic identications and ideological (...)
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  15. Hannah Arendt: Figures of Alterity; the Private.Andrina Komel - 2011 - Phainomena 76:41-74.
    e starting point of Hannah Arendt’s thought is, that being-human means being-in-the-world, whereupon we should understand the world exactly as the human world, as, therefore, the open space between human beings. e loss of this public-politic space is consequently also the loss of the conditions of humanity, the very possibility of being-human. Without the possibility of public speaking and action the human being is no longer of this world, it does not only feel excluded, but also loses the very right (...)
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  16. Freed “Gestalt”.Dean Komel - 2011 - Phainomena 76:99-106.
    When Ernst Jünger wrote e Worker, the »Gestalt theory« was already well acclaimed and accepted in psychology, religiology, philosophy, historiography, etc. e most general denition of the »Gestalt« can be traced back to Aristo- tle: the “Gestalt” as a whole is more than the sum of its parts. But this denition does not mean much, if we understand the relation between the whole and its parts merely in a formal manner, and not organically. e livingly connected relation is in question, (...)
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  17. Freedom ‘on the edge’: What Dietrich Bonhoeer has to say about Freedom?Anton Mlinar - 2011 - Phainomena 76:107-120.
    Dietrich Bonoheer's reection on freedom is not theoretical or programmatic and indierent at all. On freedom he wrote mostly in conjunction with responsibility. e more prominent is his testimony for freedom. It was for him a complete exposure in the act, without prior knowledge about it. Bonhoeer connected it with so called “ethical suspension” in the act. e notion of freedom as an act matches well with contemporary critic of ethics; it is dierent a lot from idealistic notion of freedom (...)
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  18. Freedom, Responsibility and Self-Awareness in Husserl.Thomas Nenon - 2011 - Phainomena 76:161-182.
    e following essay is organized around eighteen theses concerning the relationship between freedom, responsibility and self- awareness that I believe are both correct and consistent with specic doctrines and the overall positions advanced in Husserl’s published writings. e eighteen theses are not meant to represent a deductive argument. Most of them are not unique to Husserl or phenomenological philosophy, but I’m not aware of any other thinker who has hat brought all of them together as does Husserl.
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  19. The Humanities as the Origin of the Freedom of the Media.Bernard Nežmah - 2011 - Phainomena 76:259-268.
    e openness towards the thought of dierence is not something which we could postulate as a program, as an advice or as a demand. It originates in the humanities, which I understand as a culture of living; its main trait is permanent reading of books. Upon every event a humanist is prepared to traverse from the reports in the media to literature, which discusses the same or similar phenomena in history or on the other side of the world. e characteristic (...)
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  20. Husserl and Buddhism.Liangkang Ni - 2011 - Phainomena 76:186-202.
    Husserl’s confrontation with Buddhism in his review »On the Speeches of Gautama Buddha« [»Über die Reden Gotamo Buddhas«] as well as in his manuscript »Socrates – Buddha« [»Sokrates – Buddha«] allows us to dene the essential characteristics, by which he dierentiates himself from the other important contemporary western thinkers. Although Husserl’s knowledge of Buddhism certainly was limited – and herewith he probably does not equal Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Bergson, Russell, Jaspers, Heidegger and Scheler, who are by all means closer to the (...)
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  21. Is Philosophy Regional or Global?Tadashi Ogawa - 2011 - Phainomena 76:225-230.
    Philosophy is global, insofar as it is a relation of a human being towards its world and as such a thinking of the »betweenness«, of logos and of structure, as they disclose themselves in the relations between the Ego and the world, between the beginning and the end, between the Ego and the others. e theme of »the relational thinking« transcends boundedness to a particular cultural sphere. e transcendence is possible because of the insight into the identity of structures in (...)
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  22. Freedom under the Surveillance. The Disappearance of Society in the Globalitarian Age.Žarko Paic - 2011 - Phainomena 76:9-34.
    e basic issue of this consideration is that the complete failure of each articulated social resistance, be it of traditional subjects or of actors of postmodern identity politics, against neoliberal global order occurs because that what once meant the area of civil society with the idea of freedom and public goods no longer exists or has been destroyed. When the neoliberal state becomes in tendency the new society of globalitarian surveillance, then it radically abolishes the autonomous action within the civil (...)
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  23. We, the Barbarians. Thoughts on the Italian Anomaly.Pier Rovatti - 2011 - Phainomena 76:35-40.
    If it seems, that we are losing the ght for morality from its very beginning, as our option remains at least the possibility to persist in a minimal resistance, to set a boundary to our tolerance. is is only a hope, but into this hope we pour our entire civil, civic indignation. A glutinous gelatin surrounds and pervades us, and yet we must realize that we are not passive subjects of a gelatinous power, although we can become its accomplices, if (...)
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  24. the Crisis Of Crisis.Brane Senegacnik - 2011 - Phainomena 76:121-132.
    e expression “the crisis of crisis” indicates the ination of the concept of crisis, which has no real, serious weight anymore. In its core it is connected with the question of freedom. ere are only a few vaguer words as “freedom”. At the same time there are only a few words as important as it. It is vague not only because it has many meanings, but also because the ontology of that with which it is fatally linked, namely the human (...)
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  25. Curved Hermeneutical Space and the Freedom of Speech.Rok Svetlic - 2011 - Phainomena 76:269-282.
    e present article discusses the anomalies on the eld of the freedom of speech in Slovenia, which for the most part originate from a hidden co-eectuation of two excluding, incommensurable kinds of normativity. One of them is completely incompatible with a democratic concept of cohabitation and acts as a black hole, an object with an innite mass, which deforms the horizon of enunciation. Because of this deformation a whole range of phenomena cannot be enunciated, which deprives the public word of (...)
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  26. the Medium And The Absence Of The Revolution.Peter Trawny - 2011 - Phainomena 76:89-98.
    e medium and the revolution exclude each other, insofar as two kinds of violence, restlessly ghting for domination, collide. e ght is a ght for the ght itself. e violence of the medium can namely suppress the ght the revolution needs. e violence of this suppression of violence, the violence of nonviolence produces the psycho-somatic state of depression. In this depression the body is drawn together, onto itself. It does not experience anything anymore. e violence of »the ancient« directs itself (...)
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  27. The Freedom of Speech and the Freedom of Listening.Jurij Verc - 2011 - Phainomena 76:75-88.
    Freedom of speech, which focuses only on the act of enunciation, in the full availability of information in the so-called pluralistic media, does not fulll its purpose, which is the constitution and maintenance of an autonomous subject. In this full availability, in an era in which the Being is nothing, the word that allows the freedom of speech is lost in the noise-dominant communication in the media. If the freedom of speech, viewed exclusively from the perspective of potential enunciation, without (...)
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