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  1.  11
    A Logical Reconstruction of Leibniz’s Argument for His Complete Concept Conception of the Nature of Substance in Discours §8.Ralf Busse - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):447-473.
    This paper develops a valid reconstruction in first-order predicate logic of Leibniz’s argument for his complete concept definition of substance in §8 of the Discours de Métaphysique. Following G. Rodriguez-Pereyra, it construes the argument as resting on two substantial premises, the “merely verbal” Aristotelian definition and Leibniz’s concept containment theory of truth, and it understands the resulting “real” definition as saying not that an entity is a substance iff its complete concept contains every predicate of that entity, but iff its (...)
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  2.  15
    Essence, Propria and Essentialist Explanation.Zeyu Chi - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):338-361.
    In this paper I propose a notion of propria inspired by Aristotle, on which propria are non-essential, necessary properties explained by the essence of a thing. My proposal differs from the characterization of propria by Kit Fine and Kathrin Koslicki: unlike Fine, the relation of explanation on my account can’t be assimilated to a notion of logical entailment. In disagreement with Koslicki, I suggest that the explanatory relation at issue needs not be necessary. My account of essence is conceptually parsimonious: (...)
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  3.  4
    Semantic Singularities: Paradoxes of Reference, Predication, and Truth, Written by Simmons, K.George Englebretsen - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):499-506.
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  4.  14
    Plato’s Forms as Functions and Structures.Dorothea Frede - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):291-316.
    Despite the fact that the theory of Forms is regarded as the hallmark of Plato’s philosophy, it has remained remarkably elusive, because it is more hinted at than explained in his dialogues. Given the uncertainty concerning the nature and extension of the Forms, this article makes no pretense to coming up with solutions to all problems that have occupied scholars since antiquity. It aims to elucidate only two aspects of that theory: the indication in certain dialogues that the Forms are (...)
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  5.  3
    An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge, Written by O’Brien, D.María Dolores García-Arnaldos - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):507-514.
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  6.  9
    Form and Function in Aristotle.Boris Hennig - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):317-337.
    On the one hand, Aristotle claims that the matter of a material thing is not part of its form. On the other hand, he suggests that the proper account of a natural thing must include a specification of the kind of matter in which it is realized. There are three possible strategies for dealing with this apparent tension. First, there may be two kinds of definition, so that the definition of the form of a thing does not include any specification (...)
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  7.  6
    Preface.Ludger Jansen & Petter Sandstad - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):289-290.
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  8.  5
    Philosophy of Nature, Written by Feyerabend, P., Edited by Heit, H. & Oberheim, E. And Translated by Lotter, D. [REVIEW]Diego Morales - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):515-522.
    Book review of Paul Feyerabend's "Philosophy of Nature". || Reseña del libro "Philosophy of Nature", escrito por Paul Feyerabend.
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  9.  3
    The Shape of the Statue.Marilù Papandreou - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):398-422.
    This paper discusses the metaphysical status of artefacts and their forms in the ancient commentators on Aristotle’s Metaphysics. Specifically, it examines the Peripatetic tradition and Alexander of Aphrodisias to then turn to the commentaries of the late Neoplatonist Asclepius of Tralles, and the Byzantine commentator Michael of Ephesus. It argues that Alexander is the pioneer of the interpretation of artefactual forms as qualities and artefacts as accidental beings. The fortune of this solution goes through Asclepius and Michael to influence Thomas (...)
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  10.  7
    Forma Dat Esse.Sylvain Roudaut - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):423-446.
    This paper offers an overview of the history of the axiom forma dat esse, which was commonly quoted during the Middle Ages to describe formal causality. The first part of the paper studies the origin of this principle, and recalls how the ambiguity of Boethius’s first formulation of it in the De Trinitate was variously interpreted by the members of the School of Chartres. Then, the paper examines the various declensions of the axiom that existed in the late Middle Ages, (...)
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  11.  10
    Why the Debate About the Metaphysics of Biological Species Should Not Be Deflated.Giulio Sciacca - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):474-497.
    Some philosophers of biology state that the metaphysical status of biological species is context determined by the use different branches of biology make of their corresponding proper names, so that one and the same biological species can be both an individual and a natural kind. In this paper, I aim to undermine the idea, often associated with the present thesis, according to which the debate about the metaphysical status of biological species should be deflated, since it would be possible to (...)
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  12. Euclid’s Kinds and (Their) Attributes.Benjamin Wilck - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):362-397.
    Relying upon a very close reading of all of the definitions given in Euclid’s Elements, I argue that this mathematical treatise contains a philosophical treatment of mathematical objects. Specifically, I show that Euclid draws elaborate metaphysical distinctions between substances and non-substantial attributes of substances, different kinds of substance, and different kinds of non-substance. While the general metaphysical theory adopted in the Elements resembles that of Aristotle in many respects, Euclid does not employ Aristotle’s terminology, or indeed, any philosophical terminology at (...)
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  13.  3
    Methodological and Valuational Priority in Epictetus’ Enchiridion 52.Scott Aikin - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):123-142.
    Epictetus’ Enchiridion ends with a paradox—that the methods one learns to do philosophy have results contrary to one’s reasons to do philosophy. One comes to philosophy to improve one’s life, to live with wisdom. This requires that one find truths to live in light of, and in order to find those truths, one must perfect one’s reason. And to perfect one’s reason, one must attend to technical details of reasoning and metaphysics. The trouble is, in attending to these technical details, (...)
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  14.  90
    Heraclitus' Rebuke of Polymathy: A Core Element in the Reflectiveness of His Thought.Keith Begley - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):21–50.
    I offer an examination of a core element in the reflectiveness of Heraclitus’ thought, namely, his rebuke of polymathy . In doing so, I provide a response to a recent claim that Heraclitus should not be considered to be a philosopher, by attending to his paradigmatically philosophical traits. Regarding Heraclitus’ attitude to that naïve form of ‘wisdom’, i.e., polymathy, I argue that he does not advise avoiding experience of many things, rather, he advises rejecting experience of things as merely many (...)
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  15.  10
    The Sceptical Inquirer.R. J. Hankinson - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):74-99.
    This article treats of whether scepticism, in particular Pyrrhonian scepticism, can be said to deploy a method of any kind. I begin by distinguishing various different notions of method, and their relations to the concept of expertise. I then consider Sextus’s account, in the prologue to Outlines of Pyrrhonism, of the Pyrrhonist approach, and how it supposedly differs from those of other groups, sceptical and otherwise. In particular, I consider the central claim that the Pyrrhonist is a continuing investigator, who (...)
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  16. Publisher’s Note.Michael Kienecker - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):1.
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  17.  5
    Ancient Modes of Philosophical Inquiry.Jens Kristian Larsen & Philipp Steinkrüger - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):3-20.
  18.  9
    The Relation Between Knowledge and Inquiry in the Phaedo.Vasilis Politis - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):51-73.
    What is the relation, in Plato, between the account of knowledge and the account of inquiry? Is the account of knowledge independent of the account of inquiry? These strike me as important, even pressing, questions. While so much work has been done on Plato’s account of knowledge, and quite a lot is being done on his account of inquiry, I know of only the odd critic who has considered the two together. It is remarkable that critics have generally treated of (...)
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  19.  2
    Structure and Aim in Socratic and Sophistic Method.Evan Rodriguez - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):143-166.
    I begin this paper with a puzzle: why is Plato’s Parmenides replete with references to Gorgias? While the Eleatic heritage and themes in the dialogue are clear, it is less clear what the point would be of alluding to a well-known sophist. I suggest that the answer has to do with the similarities in the underlying methods employed by both Plato and Gorgias. These similarities, as well as Plato’s recognition of them, suggest that he owes a more significant philosophical and (...)
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  20.  5
    Reading the Nicomachean Ethics as an Investigation.Guy Schuh - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):167–196.
    Aristotle tells us that the Nicomachean Ethics is an “inquiry” and an “investigation” (μέθοδος and a ζήτησις). This paper focuses on an under-appreciated way that the work is investigative: its employment of an exploratory investigative strategy—that is, its frequent positing of, and later revision or even rejection of, merely preliminary positions. Though this may seem like a small point, this aspect of the work’s methodology has important consequences for how we should read it—specifically, we should be open to the possibility (...)
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  21.  9
    Keep Calm and Carry On: Sextus Empiricus on the Origins of Pyrrhonism.Máté Veres - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):100-122.
    Pyrrhonian inquiry responds to the hope of intellectual tranquillity, and aims at the achievement and maintenance of said tranquillity. According to the Tranquillity Charge, philosophical inquiry aims at the truth; hence, insofar as Pyrrhonian inquiry aims at tranquillity, it does not qualify as philosophical inquiry. Furthermore, Pyrrhonian philanthropy rests on the Partisan Premise, i.e. the claim that all philosophers aim at the removal of psychological disturbance. I show that the origin-story of Pyrrhonism evades the Tranquillity Charge, and that the Partisan (...)
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  22.  5
    Pyrrhonism and the Dialectical Methods.Justin Vlasits - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):225-252.
    The aim of this paper is to show how Outlines of Pyrrhonism II constitutes an original, ambitious, and unified skeptical inquiry into logic. My thesis is that Sextus’ argument in Book II is meant to accomplish both its stated goal and an unstated goal. The unstated goal is, in my view, interesting in itself and sheds new light on Sextus’ methodology. The goal is: to suspend judgement on the effectiveness of dogmatic methodologies.
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  23.  79
    Aristotle, Isocrates, and Philosophical Progress: Protrepticus 6, 40.15-20/B55.Matthew D. Walker - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):197-224.
    In fragments of the lost Protrepticus, preserved in Iamblichus, Aristotle responds to Isocrates’ worries about the excessive demandingness of theoretical philosophy. Contrary to Isocrates, Aristotle holds that such philosophy is generally feasible for human beings. In defense of this claim, Aristotle offers the progress argument, which appeals to early Greek philosophers’ rapid success in attaining exact understanding. In this paper, I explore and evaluate this argument. After making clarificatory exegetical points, I examine the argument’s premises in light of pressing worries (...)
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  24.  83
    Can the Pyrrhonian Sceptic Suspend Belief Regarding Scientific Definitions?Benjamin Wilck - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):253-288.
    In this article, I tackle a heretofore unnoticed difficulty with the application of Pyrrhonian scepticism to science. Sceptics can suspend belief regarding a dogmatic proposition only by setting up opposing arguments or considerations for and against that proposition. Since Sextus provides arguments exclusively against particular geometrical definitions in Adversus Mathematicos III, commentators have argued that Sextus’ method is not scepticism, but negative dogmatism. However, commentators have overlooked the fact that arguments or considerations in favour of particular geometrical definitions were absent (...)
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  25. Ancient Modes of Philosophical Inquiry.Jens Kristian Larsen & Philipp Steinkrüger - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 1 (23).
    At least since Socrates, philosophy has been understood as the desire for acquiring a special kind of knowledge, namely wisdom, a kind of knowledge that human beings ordinarily do not possess. According to ancient thinkers this desire may result from a variety of causes: wonder or astonishment, the bothersome or even painful realization that one lacks wisdom, or encountering certain hard perplexities or aporiai. As a result of this basic understanding of philosophy, Greek thinkers tended to regard philosophy as an (...)
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