Journal of Global Ethics

ISSN: 1744-9626

29 found

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  1.  22
    Security beyond the state: exploring potential development impacts of community policing reform in post-conflict and fragile environment.Muhammad Abbas & Vandra Harris Agisilaou - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):426-444.
    This study investigates the significance of understanding police perspectives on community policing as a means of addressing insecurity, particularly within the context of localised and asymmetrical conflicts. It highlights the pivotal role of the police in shaping community security and the substantial impact they can have (positive or negative) in fragile environments. The study contends that the localised nature of the community policing effectively addresses security and development issues and empowering citizens. Qualitative interviews were conducted with senior police in Islamabad, (...)
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  2.  15
    Development in times of conflict: ethical pathways towards peace and justice.Alejandra Boni, Melanie Walker & Diana Velasco - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):359-363.
    Volume 19, Issue 3, December 2023, Page 359-363.
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  3.  23
    Amartya Sen as a social and political theorist – on personhood, democracy, and ‘description as choice’. Des Gasper - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):386-409.
    Economist-philosopher Amartya Sen's writings on social and political issues have attracted wide audiences. Section 2 introduces his contributions on: how people reason as agents within society; social determinants of people's (lack of) access to goods and of the effective freedoms and agency they enjoy or lack; and associated advocacy of self-specification of identity and high expectations for ‘voice’ and reasoning democracy. Section 3 considers his relation to social theory, his tools for theorizing action in society, and his limited degree of (...)
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  4.  20
    Introduction: symposium on Monique Deveaux’s Poverty, Solidarity, and Poor-Led Social Movements.Monique Deveaux - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):221-224.
    This symposium on Monique Deveaux’s Poverty, Solidarity, and Poor-Led Social Movements includes commentaries by Sally Matthews, Renante D. Pilapil, Violetta Igneski, and Wouter Peeters, with a reply from Deveaux. The book makes the case that normative thinking about poverty should engage closely with the aims, insights, and actions of poor-led organizations and social movements. Challenging conventional framings of poverty by moral philosophers, Deveaux argues that chronic poverty is centrally about the subordination and dispossession of the poor – not mere needs (...)
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  5.  15
    Reflections on poor-led poverty abolition: a reply to Matthews, Pilapil, Igneski and Peeters.Monique Deveaux - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):263-272.
    In this reply, I respond to issues raised by Matthews, Pilapil, Igneski and Peeters in their commentaries on Poverty, Solidarity, and Poor-Led Social Movements. They pose important definitional, conceptual, and normative questions and challenges. My response acknowledges that the diversity and fluidity of political activism by people in poverty complicates questions of political cooperation and solidarity – and makes the prospect of poor-led poverty abolition and social change seem dim. The normative arguments in support of centering the perspectives and aims (...)
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  6.  12
    Peacebuilding in Mali through photovoice.Stephen L. Esquith & Weloré Tamboura - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):364-385.
    What began in 2004 as a peace education program anchored in the Ciwara community school in the town of Kati just outside the capitol city of Bamako has become a longer-term peacebuilding project now located in camps for internally displaced persons in Mali. This project has been led by students and faculty from the Institut Universitaire pour Technologie of the Université des Lettres et des Sciences Humaines de Bamako, in partnership with students and faculty in the Residential College in the (...)
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  7.  18
    Researching the Mexico-US border: a tale of dataveillance.Mitxy Mabel Meneses Gutierrez - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):347-358.
    The Mexico-U.S. border is a space considered `smart´ due to the amount of surveillance technology used for national security purposes. The technological ecology consists of integrated fixed towers, remote video surveillance systems, mobile video surveillance systems, Predator B surveillance drones, mobile X-ray units, automated license plate readers, cell phone tracking towers, implanted motion sensors, biometric data collection, and DNA sampling (Aizeki et al. Citation2021). Whilst these instruments are usually linked to irregular border crossers, transborder commuters, who physically cross the border (...)
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  8.  21
    Building ethical guidelines to produce official statistics: the statistical ethics system (SETE) for the national administrative department of statistics (DANE) in Colombia.David Hernández-Zambrano, Wilson Herrera, Elizabeth Moreno Barbosa, Andrés Guzmán Botero & Ruth Baquero Quevedo - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):410-425.
    This article describes and analyzes the design and functioning of the Statistical Ethics System (SETE) in Colombia’s National Statistical Office. It presents the methodology and general process of planning and implementation of the System, supported by a conceptual analysis of the requirements for an ethical functioning of official statistics. The general objective of the article is to make a practical contribution to the understanding of conceptual and practical features that ought to be considered in the implementation of an ethical system (...)
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  9.  18
    Responding to poverty: centering the poor and reimagining the duties of the affluent.Violetta Igneski - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):244-252.
    In Poverty, Solidarity, and Poor-Led Social Movements, Monique Deveaux criticizes and reframes the traditional, moral (and often individualistic) response to poverty in favor of a political and collective one that centers the role of the poor and poor-led groups in the anti-poverty agenda. I have two aims in this review, a supportive one and a more critical one. On the supportive side, I examine the advances Deveaux makes by 1) expanding the category of agents of justice; 2) putting the poor (...)
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  10.  17
    What can AI see? The image of the ‘migrant’ in the era of AI post-visualization.Marina Kaneti - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):307-322.
    Over the past decade, artificial intelligence (AI) has become omnipresent in migration control and mobility surveillance, with AI systems now deployed across all aspects of migration management. Critics of such trends typically examine questions of ethics and rights from the vantage point of regulatory mechanisms and the limited venues for the redress of grievances. But if legal frameworks are as of yet forthcoming and do not necessarily apply to migrants, are there alternative mechanisms to critique algorithmic decision making? To explore (...)
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  11.  14
    Listening to and representing the interests of the poor: some thoughts on Deveaux’s Poverty, Solidarity, and Poor-Led Social Movements.Sally Matthews - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):225-234.
    This article engages with Monique Deveaux’s book Poverty, Solidarity, and Poor-Led Social Movements. Deveaux argues that philosophers writing on poverty and global justice should be more attentive to what poor people themselves think and do in response to poverty. I support Deveaux’s general orientation but reflect on some challenges that need to be considered and negotiated to achieve Deveaux’s goals. The article begins by complicating some of the distinctions Deveaux makes, especially the distinction between organisations which act on behalf of (...)
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  12.  20
    An infrastructural approach to the digital Hostile Environment.Kaelynn Narita - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):294-306.
    This article delves into the ongoing consequences of UK ‘Hostile Environment’ policies, notably the Windrush Scandal and the challenges of techno-solutionism in migration governance. There is an exploration of how borders have permeated the internal boundaries of the UK and pushed private citizens and institutions to become new border agents. In this article there is a reflection on the infrastructure that has become reinforced, made visible and technologically upholds Hostile Environment policies. This article investigates the Home Office’s new case working (...)
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  13.  15
    Focussing on people who experience poverty and on poor-led social movements: the methodology of moral philosophy, collective capabilities, and solidarity.Wouter Peeters - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):253-262.
    In this commentary, I discuss three aspects of Monique Deveaux’s account. First, the method of Grounded Normative Theorizing she adopts to engage directly with the contexts and views of those experiencing poverty fits within a range of proposals to enhance the methodology of moral and political philosophy, and I would call on all philosophers working in this space to further develop these innovative methodologies. Second, Deveaux extends the capabilities approach by focusing on the group-based character of poverty and making the (...)
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  14.  21
    Recognizing the poor: a critical review of Monique Deveaux’s Poverty, Solidarity, and Poor-Led Social Movements.Renante D. Pilapil - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):235-243.
    This paper raises three critical arguments against Deveaux’s work in Poverty, Solidarity, and Poor-Led Social Movements. Firstly, the paper argues that a clear-cut definition as to what constitutes a legitimate poor-led social movement particularly its political goals and the means it is allowed to employ to achieve its objective is necessary. Secondly, the paper argues that the theory of recognition and its potential relevance for poor-led activism could have been presented in its strongest terms instead of giving it a reduced (...)
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  15.  27
    Big data, surveillance, and migration: a neo-republican account.Alex Sager - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):335-346.
    Big data, artificial intelligence, and increasingly precise biometric techniques have given state and private organizations unprecedented scope and power for the surveillance and dataveillance of migrants. In many cases, these technologies have evolved faster than our legal, political, and ethical mechanisms. This paper, drawing on current discussions of justice and non-domination, proposes a non-domination-based ethics of digital surveillance and mobility, in which the legitimacy of these technologies depends on their avoidance of the arbitrary use of power. This allows us to (...)
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  16.  17
    Moving beyond settlement: on the need for normative reflection on the global management of movement through data.Natasha Saunders - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):282-293.
    Normative theorists of migration are beginning to shift their focus away from an earlier obsession with whether the ‘liberal' or ‘legitimate’ state should have a right to exclude, and toward evaluation of how states engage in immigration control. However, with some notable exceptions – such as work of Rebecca Buxton, David Owen, Serena Parekh, and Alex Sager – this work tends not to focus on the global coordination of such control, and is still largely concerned with issues of membership. In (...)
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  17.  21
    Symposium introduction: the ethics of border controls in a digital age.Natasha Saunders & Alex Sager - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):273-281.
    This symposium brings into conversation normative political theory on migration and critical border/migration studies, with a particular focus on digital border control technology. Normative theorists have long been concerned with questions about the extent and nature of control over migration that the state should exercise, and the balance of rights and duties between states and migrants. To date, however, there has been little reflection among such theorists on digital border control technology. Critical border/migration studies scholars, on the other hand, have (...)
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  18.  34
    Data feminism and border ethics: power, invisibility and indeterminacy.Georgiana Turculet - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (3):323-334.
    Human activities are being increasingly regulated by means of technologies. Smart borders regulating human movement are no exception. I argue that the process of digitization – including through AI, Big Data and algorithmic processing – falls short of respecting (fundamental) rights to the extent to which it ignores what I term to be the problem of indeterminacy. While adopting a data feminist approach in this paper, assuming that data is the ‘new oil’, that is power, I begin theorizing indeterminacy from (...)
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  19.  11
    Call for reflections: global ethics forum: challenges, replies, alternatives.Vandra Harris Agisilaou, Des Gasper, Lori Keleher, Christine M. Koggel, Eric Palmer & Thomas R. Wells - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (2):112-113.
    Special sections are planned for forthcoming issues 20:1, 20:2 and 20:3 Issue 20:1 – submissions due 15 January, 2024Issue 20:2 – submissions due 15 MayIssue 20:3 – submissions due 15 SeptemberFor...
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  20.  13
    Towards an ethics of compassionate care in accompanying human suffering: dialogic relationships and feminist activist scholarship with asylum-seeking mothers.M. Emilia Bianco & M. Brinton Lykes - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (2):150-169.
    In the face of forced migrants’ urgent needs and ongoing human rights violations endured within and across borders, scholars note the ‘dual imperative’ (Jacobsen and Landau 2003) of documenting these realities while also responding through humanitarian advocacy and/or political activism. This article documents one such experience, that is, an action research process that began with the first author’s accompaniment of Central American asylum-seeking mothers and children in Boston and included witnessing to and documenting these mothers’ narratives in a context of (...)
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  21.  15
    Transboundary associations as agents of boundary transformation.Tuomo Käkelä - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (2):170-187.
    In recent decades, the boundaries of democratic polities have been increasingly contested in the field of democratic theory. The theoretical discussion has focused on the philosophical norms that should demarcate the boundaries of democratic constituencies. This article defends and explores an alternative approach that, instead of focusing solely on theoretical norms, theorizes democratic processes of boundary-making. This alternative approach addresses the multiplicity of intertwined boundaries bounding demos and agents capable of transforming and democratizing these multiple boundaries. I characterize a category (...)
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  22.  12
    Post-conflict amnesties and/as plea bargains.Patrick Lenta - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (2):188-205.
    I assess the force of a justification for post-conflict amnesties that is aimed at overcoming the most common objection to their conferral: that they entail retributive injustice. According to this justification, retributivists ought to consider amnesties to be justified because they are analogous to plea bargains, and because retributivists need not consider plea bargains to be unacceptable. I argue with reference to the 2001 Timor-Leste immunity scheme that amnesties conditional upon perpetrators’ not only admitting guilt and confessing but also making (...)
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  23.  24
    Autonomy plus communion: a double-dignity African efficient-based moderate cosmopolitanism.Austin Moonga Mbozi - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (2):114-134.
    African ethicists have so far not agreed on a single, precise, secular and comprehensive basic norm, an Afro-Grundnorm, which captures the core values of Ubuntu sub-Saharan African cosmopolitanism. This article constructs and proffers the ‘double-dignity’ Grundnorm that partly shares with Western stoic cosmopolitans the view that our common human ontological capacity for autonomy identifies us as members of the human species. This capacity grants our first dignity, inherent dignity. Inherent dignity only grants our universal basic (security and subsistence) rights. Our (...)
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  24.  22
    Towards an action-guiding theory of human rights.Cristián Rettig - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (2):206-220.
    What are the main conditions that any theory of human rights should satisfy to guide action? If agents must take action for a fairer world as human rights discourse suggests, this is a crucial question to reflect upon. In this paper, I make a proposal. I argue that any theory of (moral) human rights that guides action on the basis of correlative duties must satisfy three key conditions. The first condition is focused on the specification of act-types, the second concerns (...)
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  25.  12
    The Other – a troublesome dyad?Paul Walker & Terence Lovat - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (2):135-149.
    The ‘Other’ can be near to us, or far from us. We are in-relation with both. Given that, we explore whether, from a moral philosophical perspective, the ‘near-other’ is in tension with the ‘far-other’. We argue that we find our relationship with the near-other through a transcendent metaphysical empathy derived from the noumenon, which is manifest in the phenomenon as compassion and justice. We then argue that perceived differences in the phenomenon mean that we do not reliably transfer this empathy (...)
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  26.  13
    Human rights and ‘standard threats’: standard for whom?Stacy J. Kosko - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (1):63-79.
    Human rights instruments exist to respond to serious dangers that human beings routinely face, what Henry Shue terms ‘standard threats.’ According to Shue’s influential account of the structure of a moral right, these threats are ‘the targets of the social guarantees for the enjoyment of … a right.’ They are ‘common, or ordinary, and serious but remediable.’ Yet for individuals who struggle daily against serious, remediable threats that are common to their peer group, but do not routinely threaten mainstream society, (...)
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  27.  8
    Reason-based deference or ethnocentric inclusivity? Avery Kolers, Richard Rorty, and the motivational force of global solidarity.Lee Michael Shults - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (1):6-21.
    This article uses what Patti Tamara Lenard refers to as the cosmopolitan problem of motivation to discuss the roles of loyalty in two philosophical accounts of global solidarity. Avery Kolers’ Kantian, deontological approach to solidarity as reason-based deference is contrasted with Richard Rorty's controversial, anti-Kantian description of solidarity as ethnocentric inclusivity generated through sentimental education. This article offers critical reflections on the work of these two influential thinkers and combines elements of their theories to contribute a limited but useful response (...)
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  28.  11
    Connecting relational wellbeing and participatory action research: reflections on ‘unlikely’ transformations among women caring for disabled children in South Africa.Elise J. van der Mark, Teun Zuiderent-Jerak, Christine W. M. Dedding, Ina M. Conradie & Jacqueline E. W. Broerse - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 19 (1):80-104.
    Participatory action research (PAR) is a form of community-driven qualitative research which aims to collaboratively take action to improve participants’ lives. This is generally achieved through cognitive, reflexive learning cycles, whereby people ultimately enhance their wellbeing. This approach builds on two assumptions: (1) participants are able to reflect on and prioritize difficulties they face; (2) collective impetus and action are progressively achieved, ultimately leading to increased wellbeing. This article complicates these assumptions by analyzing a two-year PAR project with mothers of (...)
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  29.  18
    Towards an Action-guiding theory of Human Rights.Cristián Rettig - 2023 - Journal of Global Ethics 1:1-15.
    What are the main conditions that any theory of human rights should satisfy to guide action? If agents must take action for a fairer world as human rights discourse suggests, this is a crucial question to reflect upon. In this paper, I make a proposal. I argue that any theory of (moral) human rights that guides action on the basis of correlative duties must satisfy three key conditions. The first condition is focused on the specification of act-types, the second concerns (...)
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