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  1.  5
    African Philosophy and Global Epistemic Injustice.Jonathan O. Chimakonam - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (2):120-137.
    In this paper, I consider how the discourse on global epistemic justice might be approached differently if some contributions from the African philosophical place are taken seriously. To be specific, I argue that the debate on global justice broadly has not been global. I cite as an example, the exclusion or marginalisation of African philosophy, what it has contributed and what it may yet contribute to the global epistemic edifice. I point out that this exclusion is a case of epistemic (...)
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  2.  3
    Disaggregated Pluralistic Theories of Global Distributive Justice – a Critique.Culp Julian - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (2):168-186.
    Pluralistic theories of global distributive justice aim at justifying a plurality of principles for various subglobal contexts of distributive justice. Helena de Bres has recently proposed the class of disaggregated pluralistic theories, according to which we should refrain from defending principles that apply to the shared background conditions of such subglobal contexts. This article argues that if one does not justify how these background conditions should be regulated by principles of a just global basic structure, then the realization of the (...)
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  3.  2
    Practice-Dependence and Epistemic Uncertainty.Eva Erman - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (2):187-205.
    A shared presumption among practice-dependent theorists is that a principle of justice is dependent on the function or aim of the practice to which it is supposed to be applied. In recent contributions to this debate, the condition of epistemic uncertainty plays a significant role for motivating and justifying a practice-dependent view. This paper analyses the role of epistemic uncertainty in justifying a practice-dependent approach. We see two kinds of epistemic uncertainty allegedly playing this justificatory role. What we call ‘normative (...)
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  4.  1
    Human Dignity in Muslim Perspective: Building Bridges.Onur Muftugil - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (2):157-167.
    This essay argues that Islam, understood as a historically produced body of knowledge, contains resources from which we can reconstruct a conception of human dignity understood as a human right. This reconstruction requires a critical reinterpretation of some of these resources. Pursued with historical sensitivity and a comparative lens, this interpretative activity can bring about considerable benefits. It can help us overcome the religious/secular and Islam/West binaries which have limited the human rights debate. It can help us envision a human (...)
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  5.  2
    Anatomy of Forest-Related Corruption in Tanzania: Theoretical Perspectives, Empirical Explanations, and Policy Implications.Joseph Perfect-Mrema - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (2):221-240.
    The majority of studies on natural resources management in both developed and developing countries are silent on the issue of analysis of corruption – or they treat it tangentially, as an annoying anomaly, or simply deviance from the rules. As a result, the issue has hardly been subjected to in-depth characterisation or reforms. This study employed and integrated mainstream principal-agent theory and more recently developed collective action theory to enhance our understanding – in different but complementary ways − of the (...)
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  6.  1
    Expanding Motivations for Global Justice: A Dialogue Between Public Christian Social Ethics and Ubuntu Ethics as Afro-Communitarianism.Andreas Rauhut - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (2):138-156.
    Faced with the ongoing tragedy of poverty, ethicists call for effective measures of global justice to set up just institutional structures. Their arguments for a transnational obligation to help however remain contested, one of the main reasons for that being the lack of motivational support for trans-national visions of global justice. This articles suggests that the debate will gain new and helpful insights if it studies the motivational mechanisms at work in the dominant religious and cultural traditions, asking: How do (...)
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  7.  3
    The Indeterminacy Failures of Moral Cosmopolitanism and Liberal Nationalism.Theresa Scavenius - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (2):206-220.
    Much of the discussion on cosmopolitanism and nationalism has focused on their different normative views. The purpose of this article is to shift the attention away from the normative debate to the metatheoretical argument about how we determine moral and political principles independently of each other. I argue that the discussion among proponents of cosmopolitanism and contextualist models boils down to latent methodological and metatheoretical assumptions about what selection of facts are considered politically relevant. In the article, I explore what (...)
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  8. Truce Thinking and Just War Theory.Keith Breen - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):14-27.
    In his book, A Theory of Truces, Nir Eisikovits offers a perceptive and timely ethics of truces based on the claim that we need to reject the ‘false dichotomy between the ideas of war and peace’ underpinning much current thought about conflict and conflict resolution. In this article, I concur that truces and ‘truce thinking’ should be a focus of concern for any political theory wishing to address the realities of war. However, Eisikovits’s account, to be convincing, requires engagement with (...)
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  9.  2
    Not Just War: Eisikovits on A Theory of Truces.Thom Brooks - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):4-5.
    More work has gone into thinking about the philosophical justifications for starting a just war than bringing political violence to an end. The papers in this special section explore themes in Nir Eisikovits’s groundbreaking book A Theory of Truces and why truces deserve greater philosophical attention. This introduction briefly raises these issues and provides an overview of the papers.
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  10. The Non-Ideal Theory of Conflict Management: A Response to Critics of A Theory of Truces.Eisikovits Nir - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):52-57.
    This essay responds to criticisms of and reflections on A Theory of Truces offered by Keith Breen, David Lyons, Colleen Murphy and Thaddeus Metz. I focus on the place of truces within just war theory, the permissibility of making truces with particularly unsavory actors, the tension between present and future considerations in truce making, and Truce Thinking as an instance of non-ideal theory.
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  11.  1
    Non-Ideal Theory and the Application of Cautionary Precepts.David Lyons - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):40-51.
    This paper discusses non-ideal theory as guidance for making bad situations better by morally permissible means. It distinguishes constructive theorizing, which suggests ways of improving specific kinds of bad situation, from cautionary theory, which concerns moral risks of actions under bad conditions. Reflective moral judgment yields cautionary precepts, identifying presumptively unjustifiable modes of action. The paper illustrates the application of precepts cautioning about coercion and the exposure of others to significant risks, by considering the 1955–1956 bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, (...)
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  12.  7
    Jus Interruptus Bellum: The Ethics of Truce-Making.Thaddeus Metz - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):6-13.
    With his new book, A Theory of Truces, Nir Eisikovits has succeed in producing the most comprehensive and insightful book to exist on the nature and morality of truces during international military conflict. In it he plausibly argues that thought about such conflict should avoid binary terms such as long-lasting peace and all-out war, and instead must readily acknowledge conditions “in between” them, such as cease-fires and agreements to limit belligerence to certain times. In this critical notice of Eisikovits’ book, (...)
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  13.  2
    Political Reconciliation, the Rule of Law, and Truces.Colleen Murphy - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):28-39.
    Nir Eisikovits argues in A Theory of Truces that most contemporary conflicts wind down in a much more piecemeal fashion than our theorizing about the morality of ending wars suggests. Pauses in violence are achieved by securing agreement on narrow questions. Moreover, rather than hoping to do away with violence, theorizing would do best, he writes, to take as its starting point the fact of warfare as part of the human condition. Eisikovits aims to articulate the features of truce thinking, (...)
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  14.  2
    Excuses, Justifications, and the Just War Tradition: Are There Good Reasons to Kill the Naked Soldier?Restrepo Daniel Alejandro - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):58-69.
    In war there is a phenomenon known as the Naked Soldier problem. A combatant discovers a vulnerable enemy combatant who is unable to defend himself and usually unaware of the combatant’s presence. This enemy combatant is not presently engaged in fighting and not threatening the lives of others. While killing the NS is legally permissible, the question I address in this essay is whether or not there can be a moral justification for doing so. I think such a moral justification (...)
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  15.  2
    Iris Marion Young on Responsible Intervention: Reimagining Humanitarian Intervention.Sally J. Scholz - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):70-89.
    Iris Marion Young took a strong stance against humanitarian intervention and other so-called legitimate instances of what she calls ‘official violence’. Nevertheless, she was also aware that there may be some situations for which military humanitarian intervention should at least be considered. Young was concerned that some states will use their obligation to defend against human rights violations as a mechanism in securing or maintaining global dominance. In addition, she recognized that what counts as a violation of human rights is (...)
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  16.  4
    Understanding Political Responsibility in Corporate Citizenship: Towards a Shared Responsibility for the Common Good.Tempels Tjidde, Blok Vincent & Verweij Marcel - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):90-108.
    ABSTRACTIn this article, we explore the debate on corporate citizenship and the role of business in global governance. In the debate on political corporate social responsibility it is assumed that under globalization business is taking up a greater political role. Apart from economic responsibilities firms assume political responsibilities taking up traditional governmental tasks such as regulation of business and provision of public goods. We contrast this with a subsidiarity-based approach to governance, in which firms are seen as intermediate actors who (...)
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