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  1.  4
    Hidden Concerns of Sharing Research Data by Low/Middle-Income Country Scientists.Louise Bezuidenhout & Ereck Chakauya - 2018 - Global Bioethics 29 (1):39-54.
    ABSTRACTThere has considerable interest in bringing low/middle-income countries scientists into discussions on Open Data – both as contributors and users. The establishment of in situ data sharing practices within LMIC research institutions is vital for the development of an Open Data landscape in the Global South. Nonetheless, many LMICs have significant challenges – resource provision, research support and extra-laboratory infrastructures. These low-resourced environments shape data sharing activities, but are rarely examined within Open Data discourse. In particular, little attention is given (...)
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  2.  1
    Reflections on the Ethics of Participatory Visual Methods to Engage Communities in Global Health Research.Gillian F. Black, Alun Davies, Dalia Iskander & Mary Chambers - 2018 - Global Bioethics 29 (1):22-38.
    ABSTRACTThere is a growing body of literature describing conceptual frameworks for working with participatory visual methods. Through a global health lens, this paper examines some key themes within these frameworks. We reflect on our experiences of working with with an array of PVM to engage community members in Vietnam, Kenya, the Philippines and South Africa in biomedical research and public health. The participants that we have engaged in these processes live in under-resourced areas with high prevalence of communicable and non-communicable (...)
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  3. Art and Theatre for Health in Rural Cambodia.Chea Nguon, Lek Dysoley, Chan Davoeung, Yok Sovann, Nou Sanann, Ma Sareth, Pich Kunthea, San Vuth, Kem Sovann, Kayna Kol, Chhouen Heng, Rouen Sary, Thomas J. Peto, Rupam Tripura, Renly Lim & Phaik Yeong Cheah - 2018 - Global Bioethics 29 (1):16-21.
    ABSTRACTThis article describes our experience using art and theatre to engage rural communities in western Cambodia to understand malaria and support malaria control and elimination. The project was a pilot science–arts initiative to supplement existing engagement activities conducted by local authorities. In 2016, the project was conducted in 20 villages, involved 300 community members and was attended by more than 8000 people. Key health messages were to use insecticide-treated bed-nets and repellents, febrile people should attend village malaria workers, and to (...)
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  4. Abortion and Conscientious Objection: Rethinking Conflicting Rights in the Mexican Context.Gustavo Ortiz-Millán - 2018 - Global Bioethics 29 (1):1-15.
    ABSTRACTSince 2007, when Mexico City decriminalized abortion during the first trimester, a debate has been taking place regarding abortion and the right to conscientious objection. Many people argue that, since the provision of abortions is now a statutory duty of healthcare personnel there can be no place for “conscientious objection.” Others claim that, even if such an objection were to be allowed, it should not be seen as a right, since talk about a right to CO may lead to a (...)
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  5.  3
    “Not Just Dogs, but Rabid Dogs”: Tensions and Conflicts Amongst Research Volunteers in Malawi.Mackwellings Phiri, Kate Gooding, Deborah Nyirenda, Rodrick Sambakunsi, Moses Kelly Kumwenda & Nicola Desmond - 2018 - Global Bioethics 29 (1):65-80.
    ABSTRACTBuilding trust between researchers and communities involved in research is one goal of community engagement. This paper examines the implications of community engagement for trust within communities, including trust among community volunteers who assist with research and between these volunteers and other community members. We describe the experiences of two groups of community volunteers recruited as part of an HIV and TB intervention trial in Malawi: cluster representatives, recruited both to act as key informants for TB suspects and mortality reporting (...)
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  6.  1
    Quality of Medicines in Resource-Limited Settings: Need for Ethical Guidance.Raffaella Ravinetto, Wim Pinxten & Lembit Rägo - 2018 - Global Bioethics 29 (1):81-94.
    ABSTRACTThe quality of medicines is generally adequately assured by manufacturers and regulatory authorities for well-resourced settings, while the implementation of existing quality standards is challenged in many low- and middle-income countries. This situation of multiple pharmaceutical standards raises the question whether it could ever be ethically justified to compromise on the quality assurance of medicines depending on what individuals, communities, or societies can afford. In this paper, we contend that ethically, any unjustified exceptions to medicines’ quality assurance represents a violation (...)
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  7.  1
    Complex Mediascapes, Complex Realities: Critically Engaging with Biotechnology Debates in Ghana.Joeva Rock - 2018 - Global Bioethics 29 (1):55-64.
    ABSTRACTThe recent increase in research and commercialization of genetically modified crops in Africa has resulted in considerable and understandable interest from farmers, scholars, and practitioners. However, messy situations are often hard to critically engage in from afar, and the recent article published by Braimah et al. [. Debated agronomy: Public discourse and the future of biotechnology policy in Ghana. Global Bioethics. doi:10.1080/11287462.2016.1261604] presents certain claims that further obfuscate – rather than clarify – an already complex landscape. In this commentary I (...)
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