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  1.  2
    Target Africa: Ideological Neocolonization in the Twenty-First Century by Obianuju Ekeocha.Sarah Bartel - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):667-670.
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  2.  1
    The Holy Family: Model Not Exception by Mary Shivanandan.Perry J. Cahall - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):673-674.
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  3.  1
    Functionalism in the 2018 CDF Responsum.Cory Catron - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):529-532.
    In 2018 the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith issued a responsum ad dubium, addressing the question of whether a hysterectomy is morally licit in cases wherein miscarriage is foreseen with medical certainty if the woman were to conceive. The CDF responded in the positive, explaining that “it does not regard sterilization.” The responsum provoked great controversy, with some commentators wondering at the prudence of issuing the teaching, and others questioning whether it represented a departure from the Catholic moral (...)
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  4.  1
    Washington Insider.Philip Cerroni - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):521-526.
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  5.  2
    Reply to the National Catholic Bioethics Center’s Commentary on the CDF’s 2018 Responsum.William Matthew Diem - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):533-544.
    The National Catholic Bioethics Center’s commentary on the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith’s 2018 responsum concerning hysterectomy fails to address the explicit reasoning that the CDF offers to justify its response. The CDF does not condone the hysterectomies in question as indirect sterilizations, justified by double effect. Rather, it defines procreation—and consequently sterilization—such that the moral categories of direct and indirect sterilization are not applicable in such cases. The CDF responsum is far more radical and consequential than the (...)
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  6.  1
    The Indissolubility of Marriage and the Council of Trent by E. Christian Brugger.Joshua Evans - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):663-664.
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  7.  1
    In This Issue.Edward J. Furton - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):517-518.
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  8.  1
    The Light Shines on in the Darkness: Transforming Suffering Through Faith by Robert Spitzer.Robert E. Hurd - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):674-677.
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  9.  2
    Philosophy and Theology.Christopher Kaczor - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):649-660.
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  10.  1
    Principlist and Personalist Approaches to Compassion.Graciela Ortiz - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):569-581.
    One’s understanding of compassionate care and one’s response to suffering depend on one’s bioethical framework. This paper contrasts the principlist bioethical model with the personalist bioethical model. These emphasize different principles, definitions, and understandings of concepts such as autonomy, compassion, suffering, harm, and help. The principlist model regards euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide as acts of autonomy and compassion that eradicate suffering. This perspective fails to keep in mind that autonomous patients do not always act for their own good. Conversely, the (...)
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  11.  2
    Challenges to the Determination of Death by Neurological Criteria.Tadeusz Pacholczyk & Stephen Hannan - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):583-599.
    Ethical concerns regarding the conceptual framework for the determination of death by neurological criteria, including several clinical and diagnostic practices, are addressed. The significance of a diagnosis of brain death, diagnostic criteria, and certain technical aspects of the brain-death exam are presented. Standard and ancillary tests that typically help achieve prudential certitude that an individual has died are indicated. Ethical concerns surrounding interinstitutional variability of testing protocols are evaluated and considered, as are potential apnea-testing confounders such as hypotension, hypoxemia, hypercarbia, (...)
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  12.  2
    Medicine.Vince A. Punzo - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):633-648.
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  13.  1
    Contro Vento. Una Vita Per la Bioetica.Elio Sgreccia - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):671-672.
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  14.  1
    Human Dignity as Concept and Lived Experience.Columba Thomas - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):545-557.
    In Evangelium vitae, Pope St. John Paul II addresses euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide by striking a balance—maintaining the inherent dignity of all persons while considering the lived experience of those struggling to see dignity amidst suffering. Subsequently, a debate about the word dignity has led to clarifications from the President’s Council on Bioethics regarding different uses of the word. This essay relies on the work of the council, especially an essay by Edmund Pellegrino, to provide a basis for reflecting on (...)
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  15.  2
    Science.Stacy Trasancos - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):619-631.
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  16.  1
    Two Wings: Integrating Faith and Reason by Brian Clayton and Douglas Kries.Brian Welter - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):665-667.
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  17.  2
    Genetic Engineering.Kevin Wilger - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):601-615.
    Genetic engineering is a rapidly evolving field of research with potentially powerful therapeutic applications. The technology CRISPR-Cas9 not only has improved the accuracy and overall feasbility of genome editing but also has increased access to users by lowering cost and increasing usability and speed. The potential benefits of genetic engineering may come with an increased risk of off-target events or carcinogenic growth. Germ-line cell therapy may also pose risks to potential progeny and thus have an additional burden of proof for (...)
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  18.  1
    Scotist Hylomorphism in Support of Total Brain Death.Tyler Wittenmyer - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (4):559-565.
    Empirical evidence has led some philosophers to question total brain death, because a brain-dead patient’s body remains integrated; it can still grow and age. Catholic philosophers have based arguments for and against TBD on Thomist principles of hylomorphism. Given such principles, the arguments against TBD appear stronger. Blessed John Duns Scotus provides an alternative set of principles. Specifically, Scotus is a pluralist regarding substantial form. However, his pluralism is distinct in that he denies a substantial form to the body as (...)
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  19.  2
    Is There a Purpose in the Biological Evolution of Living Beings?Justo Aznar - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):403-413.
    An unquestionably important biological question is whether human beings are the product of chance or of purpose in the evolutionary process. Charles Darwin did not accept purpose in biological evolution, a view not shared by his colleague Alfred Russel Wallace. The controversy has remained ever since, and while many experts argue against purpose in biological evolution, many others defend it. This paper reflects on this biological and ethical problem, relating it to the possible existence of a plan that governs and (...)
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  20.  2
    Free Will and Classical Theism: The Significance of Freedom in Perfect Being Theology Edited by Hugh J. McCann. [REVIEW]Richard Benson - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):505-508.
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  21.  2
    Hippocrates’ Oath and Asclepius’ Snake: The Birth of the Medical Profession by T. A. Cavanaugh. [REVIEW]John F. Brehany - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):498-500.
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  22.  2
    Neuroscience and the Soul: The Human Person in Philosophy, Science, and Theology Edited by Thomas M. Crisp, Steven L. Porter, and Gregg A. Ten Elshof. [REVIEW]Grattan Brown - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):500-502.
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  23.  2
    Incarnate Grace: Perspectives on the Ministry of Catholic Health Care Edited by Rev. Charles Bouchard, OP. [REVIEW]Peter J. Cataldo - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):495-497.
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  24.  2
    The Fear of Being a Burden on Others.Paschal M. Corby - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):369-376.
    In the sphere of end-of-life care, the fear of being a burden on loved ones is a significant factor in patients seeking assisted suicide or euthanasia. The claims of altruism and love that support such decisions are misplaced, and the possibility of being a burden must be reimaged within a proper anthropology. Allowing oneself to be a burden is a significant aspect not only of loving human relationships, but of a human nature that is essentially dependent and created in the (...)
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  25.  2
    The First Instant of Mary’s Ensoulment.Francis Etheredge - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):359-367.
    The Fathers of the Second Vatican Council recognized that the doctrine of the Incarnation is specifically concerned with the coming of Christ to free mankind from bondage to both original and personal sin. Original justice and original sin also can be examined through the dogma of the Immaculate Conception. By considering these concepts through the original moment of Mary’s conception, we gain a better understanding of the moment that each person is conceived. Thus a proper understanding of the Immaculate Conception (...)
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  26. In This Issue.Edward J. Furton - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):339-340.
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  27.  4
    The Ethics of Human Tripronuclear Zygotes as Germline Editing Subjects.Jeanatan Hall - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):429-442.
    Despite great interest in the field of gene editing, sparked by the advent of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated applications, the personhood of tripronuclear zygotes has not been addressed appropriately. 3PN zygotes are discarded as medical waste, and their use as models for human genome editing is becoming increasing common. 3PN zygotes possess an extra set of chromosomes, which often leads to severe genetic abnormalities; they are dismissed as “nonviable embryos” and treated as an ethically acceptable alternative to human embryonic research. However, given the (...)
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  28.  2
    Collaboration with Voluntary Stopping of Eating and Drinking.Lisa Honkanen - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):415-427.
    Voluntary stopping of eating and drinking is an increasingly popular method by which patients are choosing to hasten death when life feels unbearable. This formal act of suicide often leads to distressing symptoms, for which patients then seek palliation by medical professionals. The intentional act of hastening death is always an evil act. A Catholic physician must understand the moral implications of participating in any phase of the patient’s planning and execution of the VSED process, including cooperation in evil and (...)
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  29.  3
    Asymmetry and the Afterlife: A Christian Response to David Benatar.Marcus William Hunt - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):377-389.
    According to David Benatar’s asymmetry argument, the transition from nonexistence to existence is always a harm, and procreation always a pro tanto wrong. This argument fails to reach its anti-natalist conclusion if we maintain the view that there is no temporal relationship between our worldly lives and our afterlives. On this view, since anyone who will be freely procreated has an existence in the afterlife that is atemporal with respect to worldly time, procreators do not move those they procreate from (...)
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  30.  1
    Colloquy.David Albert Jones - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):343-345.
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  31.  2
    Philosophy and Theology.Christopher Kaczor - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):479-489.
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  32.  2
    After the Natural Law: How the Classical Worldview Supports Our Modern Moral and Political Values by John Lawrence Hill. [REVIEW]Dominic Mangino - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):502-505.
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  33.  2
    Washington Insider.Greg Schleppenbach - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):349-356.
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  34.  1
    Medicine.John S. Sullivan - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):465-478.
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  35.  1
    Science.Stacy Trasancos - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):451-464.
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  36.  2
    Among the Ashes: On Death, Grief, and Hope by William J. Abraham. [REVIEW]Brian Welter - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):493-494.
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  37.  2
    Embryo Models Derived From Stem Cells.Kevin Wilger - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (3):391-399.
    In their article “Debate Ethics of Embryo Models from Stem Cells,” Nicolas Rivron and colleagues call for a debate on stem cell–derived human embryo models. They first ask four questions regarding ethics and embryo models, and then give four recommendations to investigators and regulators. Understanding the nature of embryo models is crucial to determining their treatment. If they are human organisms, they should be protected by existing guidelines for ethical research. For instance, the good—which for humans includes organismal flourishing—precludes experimentation (...)
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  38.  10
    In This Issue.Ryan T. Anderson - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (2):165-166.
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  39.  11
    St. Thomas’s Natural Law Theory.E. Christian Brugger - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (2):181-202.
    Fifty years of debate have strengthened Germain Grisez’s 1965 interpretation of St. Thomas Aquinas’s famous article on the natural law in Summa theologiae I-II.94.2. Revisiting Grisez’s argument in light of these developments reveals that his “gerundive interpretation” of the first principle of practical reason is not only Thomistic, but essentially Aquinas’s interpretation.
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  40.  13
    The Wrongfulness of Any Intent to Kill.Sherif Girgis - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (2):221-248.
    Germain Grisez’s philosophical argument for respecting human life has been developed by fellow new natural law theorists and applied to a range of lethal actions, for its conclusion is vast: intending the death of any human being as a means or an end is wrong in itself. For some Thomists, the NNL view on killing is both lax and rigorist: They consider it lax because its narrow criterion for what is “intended” leaves out some acts, especially ones related to abortion, (...)
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  41.  4
    Philosophy and Theology.Christopher Kaczor - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (2):319-329.
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  42.  10
    God and New Natural Law Theory.Patrick Lee - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (2):279-291.
    New natural law theory holds that the basic moral principles are prescriptions to pursue the goods to which our nature orients us. Since God is the author of our nature and intelligence, these moral principles are part of his plan for creation. These principles can be known prior to knowing that God exists and prior to knowing that they are in fact directives from him. Nevertheless, since God’s plan includes our active cooperation, morally good acts cooperate with God’s providence, and (...)
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  43.  8
    New Natural Law Theory and the Common Good of the Political Community.Daniel Mark - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (2):293-303.
    Some critics question new natural law theorists’ conception of the common good of the political community, namely, their interpretation of St. Thomas Aquinas and the conclusion that the political common good is primarily instrumental rather than intrinsic and transcendent. Contrary to these objections, the common good of the political community is primarily instrumental. It aims chiefly at securing the conditions for human flourishing. Its unique ability to use the law to bring about justice and peace and promote virtue in individuals (...)
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  44.  4
    Sexual Ethics, Human Nature, and the “New” and “Old” Natural Law Theories.Melissa Moschella - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (2):251-278.
    The major difference between “new” and “old” natural law approaches to sexual ethics is that for new natural law theorists the moral evaluation of sex acts is always determined with reference to that basic form of human flourishing which is called marriage; old natural law theorists determine the morality of sex acts also with reference to the natural purpose of the sexual faculties. Ultimately, the old approach relies implicitly on prior value judgments to distinguish biological facts that are axiologically or (...)
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  45.  2
    Washington Insider.William L. Saunders - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (2):169-177.
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  46.  2
    Terminating in the Body.Christopher Tollefsen - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (2):203-220.
    The New Natural Law theory offers a distinctive account of the nature of intention and human action and, accordingly, of what aspects and consequences of a human agent’s performance should be considered outside the intention. In part, the distinctive features of the account follow from a methodological decision to consider human action from the perspective of the agent of that action, the first-person agential standpoint. This theory of action and intention has nevertheless been subject to considerable criticism. The view is (...)
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  47.  2
    Science.Stacy Trasancos - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (2):307-317.
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  48.  3
    Challenging Underlying Assumptions of Wrongful Birth.Jay Bringman - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):37-45.
    The concept of wrongful birth, which is based on the premise that a person would have been better off never having been born, is a serious mat­ter for Catholic obstetricians, especially in the context of prenatal screening. This principle, in conjuncture with the belief that individuals with disabilities have a decreased quality of life, has been used to promote a eugenic mentality. Consequently, prenatal screening tests often are used to identify fetuses with disabilities, who subsequently are aborted. Not only is (...)
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  49.  2
    A Catholic Approach to Adolescent Medicine.M. D. Heyne, M. D. Hernandez & M. D. Gilbert - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):63-88.
    Adolescence is an important yet vulnerable period of transition from childhood to adulthood. An increasing number of studies support the traditional Catholic view, which sees teens as prone to making poor decisions when influ­enced by emotions or peer pressure but capable of thriving when guided by parents and religion. However, newer policies of medical societies undermine the traditional supports of family and faith with a permissive approach toward sexual exploration. To counter this unhealthy trend, which seems to be based more (...)
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  50.  1
    Conflict Between Autonomy and Beneficence in Adolescent End-of-Life Decision Making.K. Sarah Hoehn - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):55-60.
    The ethics of adolescent decision making is a complicated mine­field with laws that vary from state to state. The case of a fourteen-year-old girl, who simultaneously was diagnosed with cancer and discovered she was pregnant, highlights several weaknesses in our current approach to adolescent decision making in the context of pregnancy. In addition, adolescents with life-limiting conditions face similar challenges that can be examined through the framework of Catholic doctrine.
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  51.  5
    Experimental Approaches to Alleviating Gender Dysphoria in Children.Paul W. Hruz - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):89-104.
    Clinical guidelines now recommend hormonal and surgical interven­tions together with social affirmation for children who experience a gender identity that is discordant with their biological sex. However, fundamental questions regarding the safety, efficacy, and ethics of these approaches remain unanswered. There is an urgent need for high-quality research to establish the overall risks and benefits of the current treatment paradigm. While acknowledging the complexity of the problem, competing interests, and logistical challenges, ethical imperatives and acceptable boundaries for scientific investigation can (...)
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  52.  4
    Philosophy and Theology.Christopher Kaczor - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):145-155.
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  53.  2
    Note on Italian Vaccine Issue.Pontifical Academy for Life - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):123-124.
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  54.  18
    Parental Obligation and Medical Neglect in Childhood Obesity.Jessica M. Meister Berger - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):47-54.
    Despite unprecedented medical advancements and the near eradi­cation of many serious diseases, there are growing epidemics of preventable illness brought about in part by the overemphasis on individual autonomy and the neglect of obligations to others. Insofar as these diseases develop because of individual choice, this permissiveness hampers the moral analysis of growing epidemics like childhood obesity. While society has contributed to its rapid progression, childhood obesity finds its origins in lifestyle choices implemented at home. Consequently, parents have an unparalleled (...)
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  55.  9
    Therapeutic Orphans.Jennifer E. Miller & Marie-Catherine Letendre - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):27-35.
    Children and pregnant women are often excluded from clinical research. This has resulted in a paucity of evidence on how medicines work for fetuses, neonates, infants, and adolescents. It also raises bioethics, scientific, and public health concerns. For over half a century, doctors have prescribed medicines to children largely on the basis of how they work in adults, despite children’s varied physiologies and differences in how their bodies absorb and metabolize drugs. Regulations and legislation have led to an increase in (...)
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  56.  1
    Washington Insider.Greg Schleppenbach - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):15-23.
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  57.  1
    In This Issue.Gwyneth A. Spaeder - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):9-11.
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  58.  3
    Medicine.John S. Sullivan - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):127-143.
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  59.  2
    Medical Futility in Pediatric Care.Felipe E. Vizcarrondo - 2019 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 19 (1):105-120.
    The transition from the paternalistic paradigm of the Hippocratic tradition to the present model of shared decision making has altered the patient–doctor relationship. This change has engendered conflicts between patients and physicians, especially in pediatric medicine, where the patients are depen­dent on their parents because of their inability to consent to an intervention independently. Navigating this complex relationship can become particularly fraught when medical futility is invoked. This situation is complicated further by the divergent approaches to shared decision making among (...)
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