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  1.  1
    The Breakdown of Higher Education by John Ellis.J. Brian Benestad - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):846-848.
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  2. Determining Ordinary Means of Caring for the Sick Using Three Simple Questions.W. Jerome Bracken - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):759-774.
    This article has two purposes. The first is to show how one can know in a simple way what is an ordinary and obligatory means to care for a person with a serious illness. Using the information at hand, one must be able to answer yes to each of these three questions: “Is this the ordinary, usual, or valid way of treating this illness?” “Is it working?” “Is it within the capacity of the patient to undergo and of the caregivers (...)
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  3. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and the Presumption of Informed Consent.David J. Buckles - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):683-693.
    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is the default response for persons who suffer cardiac or pulmonary arrest, except in cases in which there exists a do-not-resuscitate order. This default mindset is based on the rule of rescue and the ethical principle of beneficence. However, due to the lack of efficacy and the high risk of potential harm inherent in CPR, this procedure should not be the default intervention for cardiac or pulmonary arrest. Although CPR is a lifesaving medical intervention, it has limited positive (...)
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  4.  1
    Augustine on Sex and the Neurochemistry of Attachment.Miguel Angel Endara - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):695-707.
    Secular culture often advocates for the liberation of human libido and views Christian morality as a source of damaging restrictions. However, closer examination of Church teaching reveals a depth of understanding of human nature not found in contemporary secular culture. One Church father in particular, St. Augustine, offers a keen understanding of human sexuality and its importance not only as a means of promulgating the human race but also as a means of fostering the sort of spousal unity that improves (...)
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  5. In This Issue.Edward J. Furton - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):647-648.
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  6.  2
    Philosophy and Theology.Christopher Kaczor - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):829-838.
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  7.  2
    Unborn Human Life and Fundamental Rights: Leading Constitutional Cases Under Scrutiny Edited by Pilar Zambrano and William L. Saunders.John Keown - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):854-857.
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  8.  2
    Values at the End of Life: The Logic of Palliative Care by Roy Livne.Erik Lenhart - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):853-854.
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  9.  1
    Life-Sustaining Treatment Under Dispute.Jackson Milton - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):667-682.
    The Texas Advance Directives Act stipulates the process by which physicians may withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment contrary to the wishes of the patient or medical proxy. Hundreds, perhaps thousands of families and clinicians have faced this personal and distressing dispute. Catholic teaching offers a rich tradition for assessing the ethics of life-sustaining treatment and analyzing disputes over its administration, yielding the conclusion that a Catholic defense of the Texas Advance Directives Act is untenable. Two objections rooted in patient harm (...)
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  10. Washington Insider.Greg Schleppenbach - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):655-664.
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  11. Colloquy.Travis Stephens - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):651-652.
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  12. Medicine.John S. Sullivan - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):813-827.
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  13. Improving Spiritual Care at the End of Life by Reclaiming the Ars Moriendi.Columba Thomas - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):727-743.
    Ars moriendi, or The Art of Dying, was a highly influential fifteenth-century text designed to guide dying persons and their loved ones in Catholic religious practices at a time when access to priests and the sacraments was limited. Given recent challenges related to the coronavirus pandemic, there is a heightened need to offer additional forms of guidance related to death and dying. This essay examines the content of the Ars moriendi and considers how key principles from the work apply to (...)
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  14. The Ethics of Organ Donation After Cardiac Death.Matthew T. Warnez - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):745-758.
    Organ donations after cardiac death account for about 20 percent of all vital-organ transplantations in the United States. This article evaluates DCDs in light of the Catholic moral tradition. Certain premortem interventions commonly associated with DCDs are morally impermissible even though the injuries they inflict on the patient are ostensibly inconsequential. More importantly, the criteria used for expeditiously assaying circulatory death—criteria which enhance the effectiveness of DCDs—do not always guarantee that the donor is actually deceased. Unless DCD protocols attend to (...)
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  15. Broadening the View of Catholic Social Teaching and the Cost of Pharmaceuticals.Gregory K. Webster - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):709-723.
    Catholic Social Teaching, in considering economic and patient justice, calls for “participating in patient care.” Corporations often are accused of not paying their fair share, which in turn has led to demands for government regulation to lower drug prices in the United States. Meanwhile, the millions of dollars spent by pharmaceutical foundations to help lower-income patients is not seen as corporations’ taking such responsibility to assist patients. The view that CST demands lower costs for prescription pharmaceuticals from corporations that make (...)
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  16. By Man Shall His Blood Be Shed by Edward Feser and Joseph Bessette.Brian Welter - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):848-852.
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  17.  2
    Untangling Twinning: What Science Tells Us About the Nature of Human Embryos by Maureen L. Condic.Kevin Wilger - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):841-844.
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  18. Science.Kevin Wilger - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):799-811.
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  19.  1
    John Rawls: Reticent Socialist by William A. Edmundson.Christopher James Wolfe - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (4):844-845.
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  20.  8
    Individual and Institutional Religious Exemptions From Vaccines.Cameo C. Anders - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):501-523.
    Under federal law, an individual religious exemption from vaccines is valid when it is based on subjective, sincere beliefs rooted in religion but not dependent on the existence, veracity, or accurate understanding or application of denominational tenets or doctrines. Despite the subjective nature of the individual religious exemption, Catholic institutions may recognize or deny individual religious exemptions on the basis of the institution’s own religious exemptions. For example, under the doctrine of the common good, the significant risk to the community (...)
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  21.  3
    To the Sickest or to the Healthiest?Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):455-462.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has raised questions about the just allocation of limited medical resources. In this essay, I consider four pressing moral questions raised by the scarcity of mechanical ventilators, using the guiding principle that the primary criterion should be the conviction that each and every human being has equal moral status because each has an intrinsic dignity that makes him or her inestimable and inviolable. I propose that any legitimate criteria for ventilator allocation cannot discriminate among patient populations on (...)
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  22.  1
    The Human Person: A Bioethical Word by Francis Etheredge.Michael Baggot - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):624-627.
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  23.  1
    Why Free Will Is Real by Christian List.Richard Benson - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):630-633.
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  24.  1
    Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity by Michael Kinch.Thomas J. Davis - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):628-630.
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  25.  1
    Excerpts From Samaritanus Bonus.Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):563-573.
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  26.  1
    In This Issue.Edward J. Furton - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):433-434.
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  27.  2
    Philosophical Neuroethics: A Personalist Approach, Vol. 1, Foundations by James Beauregard.Benedict Guevin - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):621-624.
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  28.  4
    Is It Coherent to Be Merely Personally Opposed to Abortion?David Hershenov & Rose Hershenov - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):463-485.
    Is it coherent to be personally opposed to abortion but to accept others’ decisions to terminate their pregnancy? This might appear to be the case if one appeals to the different situations and attitudes of pregnant women. To the contrary, only those people whose personal opposition to abortion is restricted to situations in which the pregnancy and its consequences are not very burdensome can consistently hold their IPOB position and espouse an objective ethics. The vast majority of people claiming to (...)
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  29.  1
    Phoenix Rising From the Ashes.Steven J. Jensen - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):525-544.
    New natural law advocates are somewhat notorious for their loose action theory, having a track record of counterintuitive claims. In response to criticisms, advocates have entrenched, further defending their questionable action theory. This paper first rehearses the basic criticism against the new natural law action theory. It then examines four recent attempts to revive this action theory and finds these attempts wanting. Within these attempts, certain patterns arise. Given a certain means A to a goal C, a search is made (...)
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  30.  3
    Philosophy and Theology.Christopher Kaczor - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):607-618.
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  31.  1
    Adopted: The Sacrament of Belonging in a Fractured World by Kelley Nikondeha.Matthew Levering - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):633-634.
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  32.  2
    Social Shutdowns as an Extraordinary Means of Saving Human Life.Thomas John Paprocki - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):545-559.
    The effects of the novel coronavirus have raised questions about the extent to which social shutdowns are appropriate. We have a responsibility to protect the lives of others and an obligation to maintain our lives and health when possible, but there are circumstances when it is just to decline certain measures that are considered extraordinary to the situation. Measures taken to protect life must be proportionate. That is, they must offer a reasonable hope of benefit and not impose excessive burdens (...)
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  33.  1
    Reflections on Veritatis Splendor.Servais Pinckaers - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):447-454.
    The encyclical Veritatis splendor represented a renewal of moral theology in the spirit of Vatican Council II. Pope St. John Paul II emphasized Gospel teaching in light of the Old Testament, reiterating the animating role of the Holy Spirit in the New Law. Properly understood, the New Law is not a code of obligations, but a dynamic life of charity made intelligible through grace and the natural law. As a primary connection between human beings and divine law, natural law inclines (...)
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  34.  1
    Medicine.Vince A. Punzo - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):591-605.
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  35.  1
    Rescuing the Good Samaritan in Embryo Adoption and Beyond.Christopher M. Reilly - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):487-498.
    Embryo adoption, when oriented to the rescue of a dignified human person, is a merciful and morally licit response to an evil consequence of in vitro fertilization and the freezing of embryos. Those who object to embryo adoption not only misconstrue the relevant moral reasoning but exhibit confusion among the object, intention, and circumstances and between two very different potential objects. Because the mercy and charity effected through embryo adoption are at the very heart of moral action, juridical arguments that (...)
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  36.  1
    Washington Insider.William L. Saunders - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):437-443.
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  37.  1
    Science.Stacy Trasancos - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):577-589.
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  38.  1
    Pagans and Christians in the City: Culture Wars From the Tiber to the Potomac by Steven D. Smith.Brian Welter - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (3):635-637.
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  39.  1
    Learning From My Daughter: The Value of Care and Disabled Minds by Eva Feder Kittay. [REVIEW]Jana M. Bennett - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):415-417.
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  40.  2
    St. Thomas Aquinas on Impairment, Natural Goods, and Human Flourishing.John Berkman & Robyn Boeré - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):311-328.
    This essay examines St. Thomas Aquinas’s views on different types of impairment. Aquinas situates physical and moral impairments in a teleological account of the human species, and these impairments are made relative in light of our ultimate flourishing in God. For Aquinas, moral and spiritual impairments are of primary significance. Drawing on Philippa Foot’s account of natural goods, we describe what constitutes an impairment for Aquinas. In the Thomistic sense, an impairment is a lack or privation in relation to that (...)
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  41. The (In)Compatibility of the Privation Theory of Evil and the Mere-Difference View of Disability.Nicholas Colgrove - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):329-348.
    The privation theory of evil (PTE) states that evil is the absence of some good that is supposed to be present. For example, if vision is an intrinsic good, and if human beings are supposed to have vision, then PTE implies that a human being’s lacking vision is an evil, or a bad state of affairs. The mere-difference view of disability (MDD) states that disabilities like blindness are not inherently bad. Therefore, it would seem that lacking sight is not a (...)
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  42.  1
    A Thomistic, Non-Ableist Conception of Impairment and Disability.Bryan R. Cross - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):233-242.
    In this essay, I present a conception of physical impairment as a privation of the actualization of one or more of a creature’s natural capacities. This broadly Thomistic, non-ableist conception of impairment affirms the intrinsic dignity of the person with the impairment. As a result, it stands between the conceptions of disability as a mere difference and disability as a bad difference. Finally, I show how arguments in favor of disabilities’ remaining in heaven generally presuppose a denial of this conception (...)
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  43.  1
    How Fair Is Fair?Lorraine Cuddeback-Gedeon - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):251-262.
    Informed consent in research among people with intellectual and developmental disabilities presents challenges for inclusive research—some particular to the IDD community, and some shared with other vulnerable populations. This essay uses my experiences with qualitative research among the IDD community to raise questions about our understanding of consent and about the principle of justice. I draw on Franklin Miller and Alan Wertheimer’s fair transaction model of informed consent to reflect on how structural issues of injustice affect the possibility of fairness (...)
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  44.  1
    Disability and the Way of Jesus: Holistic Healing in the Gospels and the Church by Bethany McKinney Fox. [REVIEW]Kirsten Dempsey - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):417-419.
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  45.  1
    Addressing Vulnerability Due to Cognitive Impairment Through Catholic Social Teaching.Jason T. Eberl - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):243-250.
    Meeting the needs of individuals who experience vulnerability due to cognitive impairment presents significant challenges to caregivers. Primary caregiver responsibility is often relegated to professionals in hospitals or long-term care facilities, while proxy decision-making responsibility lies with families. The complex relationship among patients, professional caregivers, and families may be further complicated by the relative cognitive capacity of different patients. While some experience diminished cognitive capacity to such an extent that they cannot make any informed voluntary decisions, others may be able (...)
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  46.  1
    Answering Our Call to Witness in Prenatal Genetic Counseling.Christopher Ostertag - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):263-274.
    In this paper, I discuss prenatal screening, testing, and diagnosis, before highlighting the literature on the incidence of selective abortion after prenatal diagnosis. For Catholic health care professionals and institutions, the correlation between prenatal diagnosis and abortion is highly problematic. Several authors have discussed the concern of illicit cooperation with selective abortion in this context; and while avoiding any illicit cooperation is necessary, it is not sufficient. Given the biases against disability that exist in both medicine and society, Catholic health (...)
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  47.  1
    Disability, Catholic Questions, and the Quandries of Biomedicine and Secular Society.Miguel J. Romero - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):277-310.
    This essay aims to show why it is important to ask questions about the way Christians raise the question of disability. The central, animating concern has to do with metaphysically thin and philosophically problematic understandings of disability and the way that concept is inflected within contemporary Catholic moral discourse in the areas of biomedical ethics and social theorizing. The essay has three parts. First, through the lens of Gaudium et spes, the author discusses the source of our contemporary questions about (...)
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  48.  1
    Washington Insider.Greg Schleppenbach - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):223-230.
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  49.  1
    Imaging and Imagining Illness Becoming Whole in a Broken Body Edited by Devan Stahl. [REVIEW]Kevin M. Scott - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):420-422.
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  50.  3
    Promoting Capabilities to Make Healthcare Decisions.William F. Sullivan, John Heng, Christopher DeBono, Christine Jamieson & Cory Labrecque - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):355-371.
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  51.  1
    Disability and Inclusive Communities by Kevin Timpe. [REVIEW]Addison S. Tenorio - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (2):422-423.
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  52.  3
    Introduction to Personalism by Juan Manuel Burgos.James Beauregard - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):183-184.
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  53.  6
    Leading a Worthy Life: Finding Meaning in Modern Times by Leon R. Kass.Richard Benson - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):194-198.
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  54.  10
    Facing a Post-Truth Era, a Fierce Commitment to Data Must Guide the Abortion Debate.Charles C. Camosy & Kristin Collier - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):41-45.
    Academic medical ethics must be a bulwark against a disturbing trend toward post-truth cultures. Activism of course has its place in massive cultural debates like abortion. The fact that so many people care so deeply about these debates is part of what makes them so important. But especially when coming from clinicians, academics, and others to whom we entrust the care of our public discourse, interventions into the debates must be disciplined by a thoroughgoing commitment to engage with the available (...)
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  55.  11
    Persistent Misunderstandings About Being Transgender and Their Effect on Pediatric Care.Gerald D. Coleman - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):29-39.
    There is no paucity of academic studies, medical literature, or media attention given to concerns about gender ideology and being transgender. When reporting their findings, however, some researchers and practitioners working from a purely secular perspective overstep medical observations to make metaphysical pronouncements. This causes considerable confusion and stifles dialogue that could occur if the line between medicine and philosophy were clearly delineated. Properly understood, transgender describes an observable distress due to incongruence between one’s birth sex and gender identity. Conversely, (...)
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  56.  5
    In This Issue.Edward J. Furton - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):9-10.
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  57.  4
    Medieval Bodies: Life, Death and Art in the Middle Ages by Jack Hartnell.Nicholas Furton - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):188-191.
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  58.  5
    Examining Body Integrity Identity Disorder Through Theological Ethics.Benedict Guevin - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):93-110.
    Body identity integrity disorder is experienced by a small percentage of the population, whose idea of how they should look does not match their actual physical form. The most common manifestation of BIID is the desire to have a specific limb amputated. In a small number of cases, the desire is not for the removal of a limb, but to be blind or paralyzed. There has been a lot of discussion regarding the possible physiological, neurological, or psychological etiologies of BIID. (...)
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  59.  6
    Philosophy and Theology.Christopher Kaczor - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):169-179.
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  60.  3
    Colloquy.Christopher Kalan - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):13-16.
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  61.  7
    Human Embryos, Human Beings: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach by Samuel B. Condic and Maureen L. Condic. [REVIEW]Daniel P. Maher - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):184-188.
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  62.  6
    Integrating Spirituality and Mental Health Services.Matthew McWhorter - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):111-133.
    Contemporary mental health professionals exhibit interest in integrating spirituality into the services they provide to clients. This clinical integration raises questions about both the goals of mental health services and the professional relevance of mental health providers’ spiritual competency. Drawing on the Christian anthropology of St. Thomas Aquinas, Benedict Ashley’s approach to psychotherapy differentiates psychopharmacological, psychotherapeutic, and spiritual approaches on the basis of the different domains of a client’s personality. These domains are the focus of different professions, and Ashley’s account (...)
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  63.  11
    Two Theories of Action and the Permissibility of Abortion.Elisabeth Parish - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):59-72.
    An exchange between Christopher Tollefsen and Steven Jensen highlights the contrast between a theory of natural law that relies purely first-person account of intention and one that relies more on elements from the physical world. Tollefsen, a proponent of New Natural Law theory, argues that the fetus’s death in the Phoenix case was an unintended side effect of saving the mother’s life. Jensen criticizes NNL generally and particularly for this conclusion. He argues that facts outside the agent make this procedure (...)
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  64.  3
    Medicine.Vince A. Punzo - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):155-168.
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  65.  13
    Brain–Machine Interfaces and the Integral Person.Christopher M. Reilly - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):47-58.
    Physically enhancing brain–machine interfaces communicate elec­tronically with the patient’s mind in both directions. They present significant opportunities to improve a patient’s health and to restore his or her physical function, but they also present problems for the patient’s sense of agency and self. This is exacerbated by notions of extension and enhancement that are not grounded in an authentic human anthropology that describes the inherently dignified person as an integral union of body and soul.
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  66.  3
    Washington Insider.William L. Saunders - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):19-26.
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  67.  5
    Experiments in Democracy: Human Embryo Research and the Politics of Bioethics by J. Benjamin Hurlbut.Brendan Sweetman - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):191-194.
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  68.  5
    On Performing Reinfibulation in Catholic Hospitals.Addison S. Tenorio - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):75-92.
    Female genital mutilation/cutting is a multifaceted, culturally entrenched issue. In response to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ resources dealing with the issue of FGM/C, this paper explores what resources sexual ethics can provide Catholic hospitals facing this issue, specifically with regards to the request for reinfibulation. FGM/C ought not to be treated as a univocal medical practice; rather, in natural law evaluations of the act, the practice of reinfibulation ought to be separately acknowledged. Reinfibulation cannot be properly considered (...)
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  69.  3
    Science.Stacy Trasancos - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):145-154.
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  70.  3
    Enlightening the Mystery of Man: Gaudium Et Spes Fifty Years Later by Antonio López.Brian Welter - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):198-202.
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