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  1.  2
    Francis Bacon’s Quasi-Materialism and its Nineteenth-Century Reception.Daian Bica - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (2):141-150.
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  2.  1
    Of the Beard of a Wild Oat: Hooke and Cavendish on the Senses of Plants.Michael Deckard - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (2):85-107.
    In 1665–1666, both Margaret Cavendish and Robert Hooke wrote about the beard of a wild oat. After looking through the microscope at the wild oat, Hooke describes the nature of what he is seeing in terms of a “small black or brown bristle” and believes that the microscope can improve the human senses. Cavendish responds to him regarding the seeing of the texture of a wild oat through the microscope and critiques his mechanistic explanation. This paper takes up the controversy (...)
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  3.  2
    Francis Bacon and the Aristotelian Tradition on the Nature of Sound.Claudia Dumitru - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (2):9-25.
    Centuries II and III of Francis Bacon’s posthumous natural history Sylva Sylvarum are largely dedicated to sound. This paper claims that Bacon’s investigation on this topic is fruitfully read against the background of the Aristotelian theory of sound, as presented in De anima commentaries. I argue that Bacon agreed with the general lines of this tradition in a crucial aspect: he rejected the reduction of sound to local motion. Many of the experimental instances and more theoretical remarks from his natural (...)
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  4. Luca Addante, Tommaso Campanella, Il Filosofo Immaginato, Interpretato, Falsato.Matteo Fornasier - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (2):157-161.
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  5.  2
    Margaret Cavendish Among the Baconians.Daniel Garber - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (2):53-84.
    Margaret Cavendish is a very difficult thinker to place in context. Given her stern critique of the “experimental philosophy” in the Observations on the Experimental Philosophy, one might be tempted to place Cavendish among the opponents of Francis Bacon and his experimental thought. But, I argue, her rela­tion to Baconianism is much more subtle than that would suggest. I begin with an overview of Cavendish’s philosophical program, focusing mainly on her later natural philosophical thought in Philosophical and Physical Opinions, Philosophical (...)
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  6.  3
    Emma Wilby, Invoking the Akelarre: Voices of the Accused in the Basque Witch-Craze, 1609–1614.Dev Mahaffey - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (2):153-157.
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  7.  24
    Francis Bacon’s Quasi-Materialism and its Nineteenth-Century Reception (Joseph de Maistre and Karl Marx).Silvia Manzo - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (2):109-138.
    This paper will address the nineteenth-century reception of Bacon as an exponent of materialism in Joseph de Maistre and Karl Marx. I will argue that Bacon’s philosophy is “quasi-materialist.” The materialist components of his philosophy were noticed by de Maistre and Marx, who, in addition, pointed out a Baconian materialist heritage. Their construction of Bacon’s figure as the leader of a materialist lineage ascribed to his philosophy a revolutionary import that was contrary to Bacon’s actual leanings. This contrast shows how (...)
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  8.  1
    Spiders, Ants, and Bees: Francis Bacon and the Methodology of Natural Philosophy.Doina-Cristina Rusu - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (2):27-51.
    This paper argues that the methodology Francis Bacon used in his natural histories abides by the theoretical commitments presented in his methodological writings. On the one hand, Bacon advocated a middle way between idle speculation and mere gathering of facts. On the other hand, he took a strong stance against the theorisation based on very few facts. Using two of his sources whom Bacon takes to be the reflection of these two extremes—Giambattista della Porta as an instance of idle speculations, (...)
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  9.  7
    Thinking with Mechanisms: Mechanical Philosophy and Early Modern Science.Daian Bica - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (1):133-141.
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  10.  5
    Jetze Touber, Spinoza and Biblical Philology in the Dutch Republic, 1660–1710.Ioana Bujor - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (1):149-153.
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  11.  6
    Strategies of Dissemination for Cartesian Cosmology: Philosophy, Theology and “Mosaic Physics”.Mihnea Dobre - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (1):123-131.
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  12.  5
    William R. Newman, Newton the Alchemist: Science, Enigma, and the Quest for Nature’s “Secret Fire”.Georgiana D. Hedesan - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (1):145-149.
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  13.  6
    Needles and Pins on the Scaffold: Francis Bacon and Giovan Battista Della Porta on the Motions of the Human Soul and the Passions of the Lodestone.Sergius Kodera - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (1):33-65.
    This article discusses the powers of the lodestone for two authors, Francis Bacon and Giovan Battista della Porta, relating their observations on magnetism and human emotions to the field of learned natural magic. It investigates some of Bacon’s and Porta’s remarks on experimental work with lodestones and the ways in which both authors translated the inexplicable powers of lodestones and magnetized iron into a series of principles that also served as a structure and explanation of human emotions. I suggest that (...)
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  14.  5
    Angus Vine, Miscellaneous Order: Manuscript Culture and the Early Modern Organization of Knowledge.Alexandru Liciu - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (1):154-154.
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  15.  5
    Lex Secundum Quam Disponuntur Omnia: Trichotomic Trees in Jan Amos Komenský’s Pansophical Metaphysics and Metaphorics.Petr Pavlas - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (1):9-31.
    The goal of this article is to detail the opposition to “Ramean tree” dichotomic divisions which emerged in the age of swelling Antitrinitarianism, especially Socinianism. Scholars such as Bartholomaeus Keckermann, Jan Amos Komenský and Richard Baxter made a point of preferring the trichotomic to the dichotomic division of Petrus Ramus and the Ramist tradition. This paper tracks the origin of Komenský’s “universal triadism” as present in his book metaphorics and in his metaphysics. Komenský’s triadic book metaphorics has its source in (...)
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  16.  7
    Behind the Scenes: Paolo Sarpi, a Natural Philosopher Friar.Nicla Riverso - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (1):67-97.
    My article explores Paolo Sarpi’s achievements in natural philosophy in order to define his contribution to the intellectual milieu of his time. Sarpi’s role as a natural philosopher has been underestimated, due to the fact that his research has been unpublished and has largely perished: his works on natural philosophy and his scientific discoveries were recorded in his private papers and diaries, kept in the Servite monastery in Venice, which was entirely destroyed by fire in 1769. I explain how Sarpi, (...)
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  17.  7
    Spinoza on Revealed Religion and the Uses of Fear.Jo van Cauter - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 9 (1):99-120.
    This paper argues that fear constitutes an important part of Spinoza’s redefined version of revealed religion as presented in the Theological-Political Treatise. My claim is not only that obedience as conceived by Spinoza always entails fear, but that the biblical image of God as king or lawgiver requires fear to fulfill its function; and thus, by extension, that fear remains one of the very tissues that binds together the body politic. Although, throughout his corpus of work, Spinoza often associates fear (...)
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