21 found

Year:

  1.  2
    The Word of God in One’s Hand: Touching and Holding Pendant Koran Manuscripts.Cornelius Berthold - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (2):338-357.
    Koran manuscripts that fit comfortably within the palm of one’s hand are known as early as the 10th century CE.For the sake of convenience, all dates will be given in the common era without further mention, and not in the Islamic or Hijra calendar. Their minute and sometimes barely legible script is clearly not intended for comfortable reading. Instead, recent scholarship suggests that the manuscripts were designed to be worn on the body like pendants or fastened to military flag poles. (...)
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  2. Leidendes Leder und klagende Münze: Die Sinne der kleinen Dinge in Hans Sachs’ ‚Die ellend klagent roßhaut‘ (1557) und ‚Von dem verlornen redenten gülden‘.Bettina Bildhauer - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (2):382-396.
    This article examines two short narratives by Hans Sachs, ‘Of the Lost Talking Gulden’ and ‘The Poor Complaining Horse Hide’, as early ‘it-narratives’ that feature material things as their narrators, focalisers and protagonists: a gulden coin, and a horse hide that is then made into a shoe respectively. The small size of these things and their interaction with humans here works not to make them accessible for human handling, but allows them to provide a macro- and a micro-perspective on human (...)
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  3. Transzendenz berühren. Die (halbe) Kerze als Schnittstelle zwischen Transzendenz und Immanenz im Marienmirakel ‚Erscheinung am Lichtmesstage‘ des ‚Passionals‘.Jennifer Gerber - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (2):294-310.
    The miracle play ‘Erscheinung am Lichtmesstage’ of the late medieval ‘Passional’ offers a literary interpretation of the ‘Candlemas’ and its procession with lighted candles. After a woman has been enraptured into transcendent space, she partakes in a light procession together with the Virgin Mary and various other figures. Each of the participants carries a candle, whose light, as the text says, is sacrificed at the end of the procession. One candle, however, becomes subject of a dispute between the woman and (...)
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  4.  1
    Multisensorial Musings on Miniature Matters.Jitske Jasperse & Karen Dempsey - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (2):249-270.
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  5.  1
    Domesticating the Body of the Exotic Other: The Multisensory Use of a Sixteenth-Century Brass Candlestick.Dasol Kim - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (2):311-337.
    Through the medium of a brass candlestick made in a sixteenth-century German foundry, I discuss the Christian European household’s sensory engagement and spatial control of the Muslim body. I argue that the Europeans’ sensory experience of the turbaned candlestick reflects and reinforces their conceptualization of Islamic culture, which is a blend of fear and fascination. The turbaned candlestick allows us to explore issues rarely discussed in the study of metalwork and the European imagery of ‘the East’. The shape and scale (...)
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  6. Small Pipe-Clay Devotional Figures: Touch, Play and Animation.Lieke Smits - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (2):397-423.
    Small, mass-produced pipe-clay figurines were popular devotionalia in the late medieval Low Countries. In this paper, focusing on representations of the Christ Child, I study the sensory and playful ways in which such objects were used as ‘props of perception’ in spiritual games of make-believe or role-play. Not only does this particular iconography invite tactile and playful behaviour, the figurines fit within a larger context of image practices involving visions and make-believe. Through such practices images were animated and imbued with (...)
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  7. Mobil, taktil und nah am Körper – Über den Gebrauch von Beuteln.Patricia Strohmaier - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (2):271-293.
    Medieval bags or pouches have survived mainly in church treasuries, preserved in reliquaries and altars. Usually made of silk, they vary considerably in form, colour, motif and size. Although most surviving pouches have been interpreted as containers for relics that were safely stored away in church treasuries, the form of a sewn bag was not mandatory for wrapping a relic to be placed inside a reliquary or an altar. Nor were all bags intended for ecclesiastical use, as is evident from (...)
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  8. Dazzle, Dangle, and Jangle: Sensory Effects of Scandinavian Gold Bracteates.Nancy L. Wicker - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (2):358-381.
    Small pendant discs known as Scandinavian gold bracteates are visually impressive indicators of status and identity during the early medieval Migration Period. Much of the emphasis in bracteate studies has been on typological classification and iconographic interpretation of the pictures, along with decipherment of the inscriptions, yet the sensory impression made by bracteates has been neglected. For decades, archaeologists considered it futile to speculate on the experiential; however, recent research has begun to contend with the materiality of senses and emotions (...)
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  9.  5
    Mittelalterliche Konfliktregelung von den Rändern her denken. Ein kurzer Kommentar.Franz-Josef Arlinghaus - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):196-200.
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  10.  4
    Fremde gegen Bürger. Zivilgerichtspraxis am Beispiel des Duisburger Notgerichts im 16. Jahrhundert.Andrea Bendlage - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):119-134.
    Since the Middle Ages, hospitable courts played a central role in the complex judicial landscape of the pre-modern age for the conflict resolution of parties of different regional origins, because civil disputes could be dealt with more quickly if at least one plaintiff or defendant was a stranger. With the obvious relationship between belonging and law established by these courts, questions of asymmetries in law come to the fore, which under the common keywords of inequality, integration and exclusion are a (...)
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  11.  3
    „Indo-European in Basis and Origin“. Das altirische Recht zwischen insularem Archaismus und europäischer Verflechtung.Marcel Bubert - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):165-179.
    Research on Old Irish law was from the very beginning related to specific epistemological and political contexts in which Celtic and Indo-European Studies emerged as scientific disciplines at the end of the 19th century. The premise of historical linguistics that the Indo-European languages derived from a common ‘origin’ had far reaching implications for studies on medieval Celtic law tracts. Since linguists had discovered significant parallels between Old Irish and Sanskrit, the legal traditions of Ireland and India were believed to preserve (...)
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  12.  2
    Die ‚patria potestas‘ in Boccaccios ‚Decameron‘.Pia Claudia Doering - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):66-82.
    The power of fathers over their children – especially over their daughters – is a central theme of Boccaccio’s ‘Decameron’. Novella V,7 situates the ‘patria potestas’ in a tension-filled position between honour and law, vigilante justice and public prosecution. The legitimation of cruelty and violence by invoking the ‘patria potestas’ is questioned through the confrontation with poetic justice.
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  13.  5
    Marginalia in Medieval Western Scandinavian Law Manuscripts.Stefan Drechsler - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):180-195.
    In the present chapter, the design of select margins of late medieval Old Norse manuscripts containing the Icelandic ‘Jónsbók’, ‘Kristinréttr Árna biskups’ and Norwegian ‘Landslǫg’ law codes is addressed. In particular, it discusses the size and fillings of margins in these codices and the relation to their modes of use by original clients and later owners. Although it is well-known that Scandinavian law manuscripts contain a large number of notes written by both original and later users, the particular use of (...)
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  14.  3
    Zur Frage der Beziehung zwischen Recht und Trinken.Daniela Fruscione - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):150-164.
    Three Kentish laws written in the 7th century mention the places where the men drink.It has already been observed that drinking is not only a feature of a male warrior society, but represents a quasi-juridical institution which enjoys special protection. However, the offences committed during these gatherings and the high fines duly paid can only partly be attributed to a general violation of the king’s and house protection.Behind these laws there is an echo of more specific rituals. The legal character (...)
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  15.  3
    Gelehrtes Recht oder gelebte Praxis? Kaufleute und ihre Vertreter im späten Mittelalter.Ulla Kypta - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):103-118.
    Merchants in late medieval Antwerp worked with a number of different representatives: They appointed proxies to trade on their behalf, to collect debts in their name or to represent them in court. If a merchant wanted to authorize another person to act on his behalf, he went to a notary who issued a letter of procuration. The article discusses the role of Roman law in these procurations. It contrasts the procurations issued by the notaries with other models for procurations found (...)
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  16.  3
    Erzähltes Recht oder Erzählen vom Recht? Praxis, Theorie und Gender in isländischen Sagatexten.Roland Scheel - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):46-65.
    The society depicted in the Icelandic family sagas has often been characterised as the archetype of a ‘feuding society’. The disputing strategies found in the sagas have therefore served as an argument that the prescriptions of the laws which curb revenge were irrelevant in socio-legal practice. This dominance of the feud as the actual ‘law’ crystallising in saga disputes is questioned through a close analysis of gender roles. While ‘classical’ sagas frequently apply the motif of the female whetter who forces (...)
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  17.  2
    Ein rechtsfreier Raum? Die legale Situation auf den Färöern im Spiegel der ‚Færeyinga saga‘.Andreas Schmidt - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):30-45.
    The chapter argues for a more nuanced and empirically based understanding of the discourse on law and socio-cultural norms in Old Icelandic literature on the grounds of a narratological reading of ‘Færeyinga saga’ as a case study. It has often been claimed that Icelandic sources express an ideal of freedom based on communality as guaranteed by the law. By contrast, ‘Færeyinga saga’ represents a cynical discourse on power politics that renders law as an invariable concept obsolete and works solely on (...)
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  18.  2
    Rechtspraxis als soziale Praxis. Das Beispiel der Huntingdonshire Eyre von 1286.Silke Schwandt - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):83-102.
    This article examines the practice of law as a social practice. Especially at a time when there were only a few professional courts, the interaction at court also has a social component. Courts come together and are formed by actors for whom the judicial service was only one of many tasks. This means: at the moment of the court, at the moment of the trial, a group is formed for a certain purpose. It will be observed how these groups form, (...)
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  19.  3
    unrechtliche peinliche schmehung oder dem gemeinen nutz nuetzlich?Eine Fallstudie zur Normenkonkurrenz im Schmähschriftprozess des 16. Jahrhunderts.Jan Siegemund - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):135-149.
    Libel played an important and extraordinary role in early modern conflict culture. The article discusses their functions and the way they were assessed in court. The case study illustrates argumentative spaces and different levels of normative references in libel trials in 16th century electoral Saxony. In 1569, Andreas Langener – in consequence of a long stagnating private conflict – posted several libels against the nobleman Tham Pflugk in different public places in the city of Dresden. Consequently, he was arrested and (...)
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  20.  3
    Kommentar: Vielfalt – rechtshistorische Signatur mittelalterlichen Rechts.Andreas Thier - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):201-204.
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  21.  3
    Hagiographie und Recht. Narrativierung von Recht und Verrechtlichung des Narrativs in der Vita des Gregor von Agrigent.Philipp Winterhager - 2020 - Das Mittelalter 25 (1):12-29.
    This article examines three episodes from the Life of Gregory of Agrigento, drafted in Greek in the 9th century, in which juridical material and procedure inform the hagiographical narrative, and vice versa. It argues that both spheres depend on, and contribute to, a common ‘nomos’, an idea of the righteous, lawful and cooperative coexistence of imperial and papal power in the church of Sicily. While this coexistence is anachronistic in the hagiographer’s own times, he constructs it through the narrativization of (...)
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