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  1.  16
    An untimely vocation: Gadamer’s ‘Wissenschaft als Beruf. Über den Ruf und Beruf der Wissenschaft in unserer Zeit’ (1943).Facundo Norberto Bey - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):72-98. Translated by Facundo Norberto Bey.
    On 27 September 1943, Hans-Georg Gadamer published a brief but significant article in the conservative newspaper Leipziger Neueste Nachrichten und Handels-Zeitung, entitled ‘Wissenschaft als Beruf. Über den Ruf und Beruf der Wissenschaft in unserer Zeit’ (Science as Vocation: On the Calling and Profession of Science in Our Time). The article, which addressed the problem of the value and status of science and philosophy in the midst of the Second World War, was never reprinted in Gadamer’s work, neither in the ten (...)
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  2.  7
    The ethics of influence in state-regulated schools: Tillson v. Rawls.Matthew Clayton - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):136-142.
    John Tillson’s Children, Religion and the Ethics of Influence develops and deploys the ‘epistemic criterion’ for deciding whether teachers should promote belief in particular propositions. He defends that criterion by arguing that it promotes human well-being and enables individuals to fulfil their duty to pursue the truth. In this article I draw on John Rawls’ conception of political liberalism to suggest that the epistemic criterion is an inappropriate basis for the political community’s shaping of children’s beliefs.
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  3.  14
    Emile’s inquiry-based science education.Georgia Dimopoulou & Renia Gasparatou - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):58-71.
    Over the past decades, science education researchers have suggested Inquiry-Based Science Education (IBSE) teaching interventions for science classes. In this article, we argue that IBSE’s basic principles can be traced back to Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s work Emile or On Education (1762). First, we will look at IBSE’s rationale. Then we will turn to Emile and outline Rousseau’s educational ideas concerning science education. We will show that Rousseau’s suggested practices for science education are very similar to those of IBSE. Yet despite their (...)
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  4.  19
    Teaching and knowledge: uneasy bedfellows.Andrew Fisher & Jonathan Tallant - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):24-40.
    In this paper we explore the connection between the act of teaching and the imparting of knowledge. Our overarching aim is to demonstrate that the connection between them is less tight than one might suppose. Our stepping off point is a recent paper by David Bakhurst who (on one reading, at least) takes a strong view, opposed to our own. On our reading, Bakhurst argues that there is a tight conceptual connection between teaching and the imparting of knowledge. We argue (...)
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  5. Enabling children to learn from religions whilst respecting their rights: against monopolies of influence.Anca Gheaus - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):120-127.
    John Tillson argues, on grounds of children’s well-being, that it is impermissible to teach them religious views. I defend a practice of pluralistically advocating religious views to children. As long as there are no monopolies of influence over children, and as long as advocates do not use coercion, deceit, or manipulation, children can greatly benefit without having their rational abilities subverted, or incurring undue risk to form false beliefs. This solution should counter, to some extent, both perfectionist and antiperfectionist reasons (...)
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  6.  7
    Tillson on religious initiation.Michael Hand - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):104-107.
    In Children, Religion and the Ethics of Influence, John Tillson argues that initiating children into religion is morally wrong. His argument overlaps and intersects at various points with my own argument against confessional religious education in schools. In this brief reply I consider two notable differences between our arguments.
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  7.  9
    Religious influence and its protection.David Lewin - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):128-135.
    John Tillson’s book Children, Religion and the Ethics of Influence addresses several themes: the ground and nature of ethical responsibility; the means and goals of ethical formative influence; the nature and ground of religious belief. In this article, I focus on the issue of justification for educational influence in general. Attention to this issue could avoid some intractable problems of specifically religious influence, most particularly the challenge of providing satisfactory criteria for what belongs to the category of religion. Whilst there (...)
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  8.  57
    A moral analysis of educational harm and student resistance.Nicholas Parkin - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):41-57.
    This paper elucidates the rights violations caused by mass formal schooling systems and explores what students may do about them. Students have rights not to be harmed and rights to liberty (not to be oppressed), as well as attendant rights to (proportionately) defend their rights if necessary. For some time now, education has been dominated by mass formal schooling systems that harm and oppress many students. Such harm and oppression violate those students’ rights not to be harmed or oppressed, which (...)
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  9.  9
    Cultivating a capability for empathy in the Bologna system—the shortcomings of economics and the importance of the civil.Dirk Schuck & Lorenzo Pecchi - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):1-23.
    A central aim of the original Bologna Declaration in 1999 was to give the opportunity of advancement in education to every European citizen. According to the Declaration, this goal is worth achieving not simply in order to provide better-qualified workers within the European Union, rather, the aim of higher education within the European Union is understood in a holistic sense as a prerequisite for the composition of a well-functioning European civil society. How can such an ambitious goal be achieved? In (...)
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  10.  9
    Autonomy, rationality, and religious initiation: replies to Hand, Wareham, Gheaus, Lewin, and Clayton.John Tillson - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):143-151.
    John Tillson concludes the symposium on his Children, Religion and the Ethics of Influence by replying to his five respondents. The reply focusses on Michael Hand’s defence of parental rights to raise their children in their faith; Ruth Wareham’s suggestion that the value of autonomy rules out a wider range of impermissible religious influences than Tillson’s account is able to; David Lewin’s alternative criteria for ethical influence and scepticism about rationality’s objectivity; Anca Gheaus’ proposal that initiation into multiple contradictory religious (...)
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  11.  13
    Children, Religion and the Ethics of Influence: introduction to the symposium.John Tillson - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):99-103.
    It is morally impermissible for parents, educators, and others to initiate children into religious belief systems. That is the provocative conclusion of John Tillson’s Children, Religion and the Ethics of Influence—the book which is the focus of the present symposium. This introduction briefly summarizes the book’s arguments together with the criticisms levelled against them. The symposium includes critiques by Matthew Clayton, Anca Gheaus, Michael Hand, David Lewin, and Ruth Wareham. Clayton and Wareham propose alternative bases for prohibiting religious initiation, whilst (...)
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  12.  11
    Noncognitive religious influence and initiation in Tillson’s Children, Religion and the Ethics of Influence.Ruth J. Wareham - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):108-119.
    In Children, Religion and the Ethics of Influence, John Tillson sets out a clear and convincing case for the view that children ought not to be initiated into religious faith by their parents or others with the relevant ‘extra-parental responsibilities’. However, by predicating his thesis on an understanding of illegitimate religious influence that largely equates initiation into faith with the inculcation of a distinctive type of propositional content, I contend that Tillson misses some of the potential harms such initiation may (...)
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  13.  7
    The Right to Higher Education: A Political Theory. [REVIEW]Dustin C. Webster - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 58 (1):152-154.
    This review provides a summary of the argument made by Christopher Martin in his book “The Right to Higher Education: A Political theory.” It outlines how Martin makes a unique and in many ways compelling argument, but argues that a significant weakness of the book is that there is a lack of clarity around the concept of ‘higher education’ as Martin conceives it.
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  14.  13
    Of mice, men, and ethics: literary study and moral concern for nonhuman animals.Ross Collin - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1161-1175.
    This article explores the philosopher Alice Crary’s ideas about ethics, literature, and nonhuman animals. Through studying certain works of literature, Crary writes, readers can see aspects of animals’ moral characteristics that are difficult to perceive outside of literary study. To illustrate and extend Crary’s argument, the article presents a reading of John Steinbeck’s (1937/1993) Of Mice and Men, a novella that is taught frequently in secondary schools and that has been re-evaluated by critics as offering insights into social inequality and (...)
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  15.  13
    Inclusion, democracy, and philosophy of education: Nuraan Davids and Yusef Waghid's Democratic education as inclusion.Penny Enslin - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1193-1202.
    For philosophers of education who hold on to the optimistic hope that democracy education can play a part in halting the decline of democracy, Davids and Waghid point the way towards its potential contribution when approached by making inclusion foundational to democratic education. Taking a poststructuralist approach as the best way to articulate an expanded conception of inclusion, this book makes the case that there is an urgent need for a reconsidered conception of democratic education that appropriately addresses race, ethnicity (...)
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  16.  13
    Finding one’s way: a response to the idea of an education after progress.Elisabet Langmann - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1119-1126.
    Inspired by the work of Hannah Arendt, this response article focusses on the tension between hope in the future and lost hope in the present inherent in the modern idea of progress. The backdrop of the Suite ‘Education after Progress’ is some of the interrelated challenges that we are facing today, such as climate change, new pandemics, mass migration, and the rise of populism. Drawing on different philosophical concepts and strands, the five articles in the Suite explore what it would (...)
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  17.  10
    An error of punishment defences in the context of schooling.DaN McKee - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1127-1146.
    Whenever justification of classroom punishment has been attempted it has usually been on grounds that punishment acts either appropriately pedagogically, teaching students how to behave morally, or is a necessary evil that enables the practical running of the school so that it may carry out its educational business. By itself the first justification leaves punishment in schools as only an extension of wider social attitudes about the virtue of punishing perceived moral wrongdoing, rather than providing any distinct argument for punishment (...)
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  18.  14
    Kinopedagogy as non-conservative education and time as the abode of humans.Stefano Oliverio - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1103-1118.
    In this paper, the endeavour to understand how to think of education ‘after progress’, viz. in an age in which progress has become problematic, is undertaken by focusing on the theme of time. Dovetailing Klaus Mollenhauer’s reflections on the rise of the Bildungszeit at the dawn of modernity with Thomas Popkewitz’s analyses of ‘cosmopolitan time’ presiding over pedagogical reform from the 19th century to the present, I shall, first, explore this temporal configuration of modern schooling (which goes hand in hand (...)
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  19.  17
    Making the most of it: thinking about educational time with Hägglund and Levinas.Lana Parker - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1147-1160.
    This paper explores the concept of time in education. It argues that the neoliberal capitalist construct of time as a resource to be deployed in service of labour—ever-accelerating—has permeated education, with implications for curriculum, teaching, and learning. To slow the effects of neoliberal capitalism in schools requires a reconsideration of time that permits both different understandings of how time is encountered and different values orienting how one spends one’s time. Using Hägglund’s argument for finitude and Levinas’ idea of time as (...)
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  20.  12
    Learning after progress? Isabelle Stengers, artificial learning, and the future as problem.Hans Schildermans - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1044-1058.
    The aim of this article is to rethink the relation between education and progress, claiming that discourses of progress tend to project specific visions of the future and thereby instrumentalize education to achieve these visions while foreclosing other possible futures. The first part of the paper argues that the historical pact between education and progress has been recently recast in terms of learning. Learning receives at the same time an economic and a political interpretation in this context, turning issues such (...)
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  21.  8
    Questioning progress in times of ‘no future’: an editorial introduction to the suite.Paul Standish - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1041-1043.
    The journal is delighted to include the following suite of articles on the theme of ‘Questioning Progress in Times of “No Future”: Orientations for Education’.
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  22.  14
    Redeeming education after progress: composing variations as a way out of innovation tyrannies.Bianca Thoilliez - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1087-1102.
    At a time of pedagogical exhaustion, this article wants to imagine ways to redeem education, to spare education from its unaccomplished promises, reinvent and renew its vows, and make it somehow work towards possible futures. But how can this be done when there is no longer the old inherited faith in a direction of history with an end, no ‘telos’ nor faith that educational institutions will inevitably move societies forwards? Is there any ‘after’ if the arrow of history points in (...)
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  23.  11
    Reading Kant as a radical empiricist: or how to find an orientation for education after progress.Joris Vlieghe - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1059-1071.
    This article deals with the educational challenge of responding to the pending ecological crisis (and many other future apocalyptic scenarios that haunt our imagination). It seems we are living in a time when we have given up on the idea that progress is possible or desirable, and this questions education at its roots. In order to find a proper educational response that befits our time, it is requested that we gain a new sense of orientation (which is no longer aimed (...)
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  24.  17
    Studying with a teacher: education beyond the logic of progress.Piotr Zamojski - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1072-1086.
    The article presents a thought experiment aimed at indicating a possibility for thinking education beyond the logic of progress. In its first part, the argument reconstructs the entanglement of the modern idea of progress (as found in Francis Bacon and Comenius) and education, while tracking down the specific coupling of obedience and conquest at work. Through such an analysis a link between the ideas of progress and of emancipation is determined, which leads to the acknowledgement of the difficulty of the (...)
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  25.  19
    Political anger, affective injustice, and civic education.Michalinos Zembylas - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (6):1176-1192.
    This article analyses arguments and concerns about the emergence of feelings of anger amongst students, when issues of injustice are encountered in the study of the subject civic education. The aim is to determine the extent to which such concerns supply grounds for regulating anger as counterproductive. In particular, it is argued that to encourage students to forgo all feelings of anger that might be aroused by issues of injustice that students have encountered in civic education—in the name of positive (...)
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  26.  15
    How the notion of epistemic injustice can mitigate polarization in a conversation about cultural, ethnic, and racial categorizations.Ingvill Bjørnstad Åberg - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):983-1003.
    ABSTRACT It is a common contention that education done uncritically and unreflectively may serve to sustain and justify the status quo, in terms of mechanisms of cultural or racial privileging and marginalization. This article explores an argument made from within anti-oppressive education theory and advocated by theorist Kevin Kumashiro, namely that transformative education must entail altering harmful citational practices. I see two shortcomings in relation to this argument: first, its focus on discursive practice entails a prerequisite of high discursive literacy. (...)
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  27.  23
    Epistemic injustice in educational policy: an account of structural contributory injustice.Megan L. Bogia - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):941-963.
    In this paper, I introduce a special case of epistemic injustice that I call ‘structural contributory injustice’. This conception aims to capture some dimensions of how policy—separately from individual agential interactions—can generate epistemic injustice at a group level. I first locate the case within Kristie Dotson’s original conception of contributory injustice. I then consider one potential case of structural contributory injustice—namely, the policy problem of significant financial risk burden on students considering university in the USA. Finally, I consider potential policy (...)
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  28.  21
    Epistemic injustice through transformative learning.Fran Fairbairn - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):964-982.
    In this paper, I argue that epistemic injustice can result from transformative learning. Transformative learning causes a radical change in the structure of a student’s personal epistemic resources to bring them in line with the structure of a discipline’s shared epistemic resources. When those shared epistemic resources are biased, this transformation prevents students from retaining aspects of their personal epistemic resources which it is strongly in their interests (as well as in the interests of the broader epistemic community) to retain. (...)
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  29.  25
    Does Mills’ epistemology suggest a hermeneutic injustice of White Afroscepticism?Sheron Fraser-Burgess - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):826-841.
    Charles Mills posits an epistemology of ignorance that underwrites the complicity of Whites, or people of Western European descent, as signatories of the racial contract. There is prevailing discourse about the complicity of White persons in perpetuating racism and whether they can experience epistemic injustice. In this paper, the claim to hermeneutical injustice, in particular, makes a further assertion that moral blameworthiness is mitigated for a subcategory of White Americans because of being socialized into a White-dominant culture of caste-based Afroscepticism. (...)
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  30. From gender segregation to epistemic segregation: a case study of the school system in Iran.Shadi Heidarifar - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):901-922.
    In this paper, I show that there is a bidirectional relationship between gender-based social norms and gender-segregated education policies that excludes girls from knowledge production within the Iranian school system. I argue that gender segregation in education reproduces hermeneutic inequality through the reinforcement of epistemic segregation as a form of epistemic injustice. In particular, I focus on gender-based instructional epistemic injustice, which refers to a set of epistemic practices that actively exclude a student or an education professional in their capacity (...)
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  31. Metaphilosophical Myopia and the Ideal of Expansionist Pluralism.Ian James Kidd - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):1025-1040.
    This paper argues for the diversification of university-level philosophy curricula. I defend the ideal of expansionist pluralism and connect it to metaphilosophical myopia – problematically limited or constrained visions of the range of forms taken by philosophy. Expansively pluralist curricula work to challenge metaphilosophical myopia and one of its costs, namely, a specific kind of hermeneutical injustice, perpetrated against the communities and traditions shaped by the occluded forms of philosophy.
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  32.  13
    Testimonial justice and the voluntarism problem: the virtue of just acceptance.Ben Kotzee & Kunimasa Sato - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):803-825.
    ABSTRACT This paper examines the ‘voluntarism’ challenge for achieving testimonial justice and advocates the virtue of just acceptance of testimony as the right target for efforts to alleviate testimonial injustice. First, we review the credibility deficit case of interpersonal testimonial injustice and explain how the doxastic voluntarism problem poses a challenge to redressing such testimonial injustice. Specifically, the voluntarism problem seems to rule out straightforward control over what and whom people believe; thus, the solution to the problem of testimonial injustice (...)
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  33.  21
    Epistemic injustice? Banning ‘critical race theory’, ‘divisive topics’, and ‘embedded racism’ in the classroom.Henry Lara-Steidel & Winston C. Thompson - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):862-879.
    In more than half of its states, the USA has recently passed or proposed legislation to limit or ban public educational curricular reference to race, gender, sexuality, or other identity topics. The stated justifications for these legislative moves are myriad, but they share a foundational claim; namely, these topics are asserted to be politically and socially divisive such that they ought not to be included within state-controlled schools. In this paper, we consider the claims of divisiveness regarding these topics and (...)
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  34.  14
    Epistemic injustice in education: exploring structural approaches, envisioning structural remedies.A. C. Nikolaidis - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):842-861.
    Since the publication of Miranda Fricker’s seminal book Epistemic Injustice, philosophy of education scholarship has been mostly limited to analyses of culprit-based epistemic injustice in education. This has left structural manifestations relatively underexplored with great detriment to those who are most vulnerable to experience such injustice. This paper aims to address this oversight and open avenues for further research by exploring approaches to theorizing structural epistemic injustice in education and envisioning efficacious remedies. The author identifies three approaches: one that focusses (...)
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  35.  13
    Epistemic injustice: complicity and promise in education.A. C. Nikolaidis & Winston C. Thompson - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):781-790.
    The 2007 publication of Miranda Fricker’s celebrated book Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing gave way to a burgeoning area of study in philosophy of education. The book’s arguments create a context for expanding the scope of work on epistemic issues in education by moving beyond direct explorations of the distribution of epistemic goods and the role of power in curriculum development. Since that time, the rich scholarship on epistemic injustice in philosophy of education examines a variety of (...)
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  36.  26
    Education, epistemic justice, and truthfulness: Miranda Fricker interviewed by A. C. Nikolaidis and Winston C. Thompson.A. C. Nikolaidis, Winston C. Thompson & Miranda Fricker - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):791-802.
    In her groundbreaking book, Epistemic Injustice, renowned moral philosopher and social epistemologist Miranda Fricker coined the term epistemic injustice to draw attention to the pervasive impact of epistemic oppression on marginalized social groups. Fricker’s account spurred a flurry of scholarship regarding the discriminatory impact of epistemic injustice and gave birth to a domain of philosophical inquiry that has extended far beyond the disciplinary boundaries of philosophy. In this interview, Fricker responds to questions posed by A. C. Nikolaidis and Winston C. (...)
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  37.  14
    The paradox of epistemic ability profiling.Ashley Taylor - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):880-900.
    Intellectually disabled students face particular barriers to epistemic participation within schooling contexts. While negative forms of bias against intellectually disabled people play an important role in creating these barriers, this paper suggests that it is often because of the best intentions of educators and peers that intellectually disabled students are vulnerable to forms of epistemic injustice. The author outlines a form of epistemic injustice that operates through an educational practice widely regarded as serving the interests of intellectually disabled students. ‘Epistemic (...)
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  38.  12
    Resisting policing in higher education: wilful White ignorance in the campus safety debate.Rebecca M. Taylor & Martha Perez-Mugg - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):923-940.
    Activists have challenged the reach of the carceral state into higher education. Whether calling out the exclusion of currently and formerly incarcerated people from higher education or the ways campus police perpetuate the racial and economic biases that plague the US criminal legal system, these voices offer insights that higher education leaders should take seriously. Yet, these challenges are often met with appeals to safety, which purport to override concerns about the harms produced by extension of the criminal legal system (...)
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