Year:

  1.  2
    Philosophy Across the Curriculum and the Question of Teacher Capacity; Or, What Is Philosophy and Who Can Teach It?Lauren Bialystok - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):817-836.
    Pre-college philosophy has proliferated greatly over the last few decades, including in the form of ‘philosophy across the curriculum’. However, there has been very little sustained examination of the nature of philosophy as a subject relative to other standard pre-college subjects and the kinds of expertise an effective philosophy teacher at this level should possess. At face value, the minimal academic preparation expected for competence in secondary philosophy instruction, compared to the high standards for teaching other subjects, raises questions and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  2
    The Ethics of Research Excellence.C. Conroy James & Smith Richard - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):693-708.
    We here analyse the ethical dimensions of the UK's ‘Research Excellence Framework’, the latest version of an exercise which assesses the quality of university research in the UK every seven or so years. We find many of the common objections to this exercise unfounded, such as that it is excessively expensive by comparison with alternatives such as various metrics, or that it turns on the subjective judgement of the assessors. However there are grounds for concern about the crude language in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  3
    Education and the Free Will Problem: A Spinozist Contribution.Johan Dahlbeck - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):725-743.
    In this Spinozist defence of the educational promotion of students’ autonomy I argue for a deterministic position where freedom of will is deemed unrealistic in the metaphysical sense, but important in the sense that it is an undeniable psychological fact. The paper is structured in three parts. The first part investigates the concept of autonomy from different philosophical points of view, looking especially at how education and autonomy intersect. The second part focuses on explicating the philosophical position of causal determinism (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  1
    Introduction.Naomi Hodgson - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):E1-E7.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  1
    An Overview.Naomi Hodgson - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):E8-E8.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Assessing Concept Possession as an Explicit and Social Practice.Alessia Marabini & Luca Moretti - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):801-816.
    We focus on issues of learning assessment from the point of view of an investigation of philosophical elements in teaching. We contend that assessment of concept possession at school based on ordinary multiple-choice tests might be ineffective because it overlooks aspects of human rationality illuminated by Robert Brandom’s inferentialism––the view that conceptual content largely coincides with the inferential role of linguistic expressions used in public discourse. More particularly, we argue that multiple-choice tests at schools might fail to accurately assess the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Virtue Through Challenge: Moral Development and Self‐Transformation.Alistair Miller - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):785-800.
    In this article, I argue that although the Aristotelian ideal of leading a virtuous life for its own sake is admirable, conventional Aristotelian and neo-Aristotelian accounts of how it might be realised are empirically inadequate: Habituation is unlikely to produce ‘a love of virtue’, practical experience cannot then produce practical judgement or phronesis, and Aristotle's conception of a virtuous life excludes all but an idealised elite. Instead, I argue that two conceptually distinct aspects of moral development can be identified: the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  34
    Humans, Animals and the World We Inhabit—On and Beyond the Symposium ‘Second Nature, Bildung and McDowell: David Bakhurst's The Formation of Reason’.Koichiro Misawa - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):744-759.
    David Bakhurst's 2011 book ‘The Formation of Reason’ explores the philosophy of John McDowell in general and the Aristotelian notion of second nature more specifically, topics to which philosophers of education have not yet given adequate attention. The book's widespread appeal led to the symposium ‘Second Nature, Bildung and McDowell: David Bakhurst's The Formation of Reason’, which appeared in the first issue of the 50th anniversary volume of the Journal of Philosophy of Education in 2016. Despite its obvious educational relevance, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  1
    Jean‐Jacques Rousseau, the Mechanised Clock and Children's Time.Amy Shuffelton - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):837-849.
    This article explores a perplexing line from Rousseau's Emile: his suggestion that the ‘most important rule’ for the educator is ‘not to gain time but to lose it’. An analysis of what Rousseau meant by this line, the article argues, shows that Rousseau provides the philosophical groundwork for a radical critique of the contemporary cultural framework that supports homework, standardised testing, and the competitive extracurricular activities that consume children's time. He offers important insights to contemporary parents and educators wishing to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  1
    Mastering as an Inferentialist Alternative to the Acquisition and Participation Metaphors for Learning.Samuel D. Taylor, Ruben Noorloos & Arthur Bakker - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):769-784.
    A tension has been identified between the acquisition and participation metaphors for learning, and it is generally agreed that this tension has still not been adequately resolved. In this paper, we offer an alternative to the acquisition and participation metaphors for learning: the metaphor of mastering. Our claim is that the mastering metaphor, as grounded in inferentialism, allows one to treat both the acquisition and participation dimensions of learning as complementary and mutually constitutive. Inferentialism is a semantic theory which explains (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  7
    Indoctrination and Systems: A Reply to Rebecca Taylor.John White - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):760-768.
    This is a reply to Rebecca Taylor's 2017 JOPE article ‘Indoctrination and Social Context: A System-based Approach to Identifying the Threat of Indoctrination and the Responsibilities of Educators’. It agrees with her in going beyond the indoctrinatory role of the individual teacher to include that of whole educational systems, but differs in emphasizing indoctrinatory intention rather than outcome; and in allowing the possibility of indoctrination without individual teachers being indoctrinators at all.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  1
    Re‐Envisioning Human Rights in the Light of Arendt and Rancière: Towards an Agonistic Account of Human Rights Education.Michalinos Zembylas - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):709-724.
    This article takes up Arendt's ‘aporetic’ framing of human rights as well as Rancière's critique and suggests that reading them together may offer a way to re-envision human rights and human rights education —not only because they make visible the perplexities of human rights, but also in that they call for an agonistic understanding of rights; namely, the possibility to make new and plural political and ethical claims about human rights as practices that can be evaluated critically rather than taken (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  5
    Activity Concepts and Expertise.Mark Addis - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):574-587.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  2
    Introduction.Mark Addis & Christopher Winch - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):557-573.
    This volume brings together a number of related contributions on the topic of expertise and education. Expertise is a topic that is beginning to receive more attention in the Philosophy of Education and discussions are closely related to the epistemological debate concerning the nature of know-how which has also burgeoned in recent years within ‘mainstream’ epistemology. More specifically, this volume focuses on the relevance of expertise to professional education and practice, with the aim on shedding light on what is involved (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  1
    The Role of ‘Autonomy’ in Teaching Expertise.Irene Bucelli - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):588-604.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  4
    Making Sense of Knowing‐How and Knowing‐That.L. U. M. Gerard - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):655-672.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  2
    Three Views on Expertise: Philosophical Implications for Rationality, Knowledge, Intuition and Education.Gobet Fernand - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):605-619.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  10
    Drawing on a Sculpted Space of Actions: Educating for Expertise While Avoiding a Cognitive Monster.Machiel Keestra - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):620-639.
    Philosophers and scientists have across the ages been amazed about the fact that development and learning often lead to not just a merely incremental and gradual change in the learner but sometimes to a result that is strikingly different from the learner’s original situation: amazed, but at times also worried. Both philosophical and cognitive neuroscientific insights suggest that experts appear to perform ‘different’ tasks compared to beginners who behave in a similar way. These philosophical and empirical perspectives give some insight (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Two Social Dimensions of Expertise.Ben Kotzee & Jp Smit - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):640-654.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  1
    Making Sense of Knowing‐How and Knowing‐That.Lum Gerard - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):655-672.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  2
    Professional Knowledge, Expertise and Perceptual Ability.Christopher Winch - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):673-688.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  4
    ‘Where Are You?’ Giving Voice to the Teacher by Reclaiming the Private/Public Distinction.Lovisa Bergdahl & Elisabet Langmann - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):461-475.
    In a time of cultural pluralism and legitimation crisis, there is an increasing uncertainty among teachers in Sweden about with what right they are fostering other people's children. What does it mean to teach ‘common values’ to the coming generation? How do teachers find legitimacy and authority for this endeavour, not as family members or as politicians, but as teachers? To respond to this uncertainty, the paper takes the public/private distinction as a starting-point for rethinking the place of the school. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  1
    The Archaeology of Heroes: Carlyle, Foucault and the Pedagogy of Interdisciplinary Narrative Discourse.Campbell Louise - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):401-414.
    This paper argues in favour of the beneficial currency of Thomas Carlyle's ‘On Heroes, Hero-worship and the Heroic in History’ in three ways, each of which finds the basis of its critique in aspects of Foucault's theories of discursive practice, as explored in Foucault's theories of historical discourse; 1) that Carlyle's terminology connects with his discursive practice in an ambiguous manner, as his concept of worship is more akin to study than devotion, if we take the text of his lectures (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  4
    For Example? A Philosophical Case Study of Some Problems When Abstract Educational Theory Ignores Concrete Practice.Clinton Golding - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):476-490.
    In Philosophy of Education we frequently argue for or against different educational theories. Yet, as I illustrate in this analysis of two articles, in order to maintain the abstract theoretical distinctions, we are liable to ignore the concrete details of practice, caricature the theories we reject and make false distinctions. The two articles that I analyse, one from Golding and one from Boghossian, grapple with the pedagogical theories of transmission teaching, constructivism, pragmatism and Socratic pedagogy, in the context of dialogical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Education, Learning and Freedom.Geoffrey Hinchliffe - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):430-442.
    This paper takes as its starting point Kant's analysis of freedom in the Critique of Pure Reason. From this analysis, two different types of freedom are discerned, formative and instrumental freedom. The paper suggests that much of what passes for the pedagogy of learning in UK universities takes the form of an instrumental freedom. This, however, involves the neglect of formative freedom—the power to put learning to question. An emancipatory concept of education requires that formative freedom lies at the heart (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. A Janus‐Faced Approach to Learning. A Critical Discussion of Habermas' Pragmatic Approach.Salvatore Italia - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):443-460.
    A realist approach to learning is what I propose here. This is based on a non-epistemic dimension whose presence is a necessary assumption for a concept of learning of a life-world as complementary to learning within a life-world. I develop my approach in opposition to Jürgen Habermas' pragmatic approach, which seems to lack of something from a realist point of view.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  2
    Political and Aesthetic Equality in the Work of Jacques Rancière: Applying His Writing to Debates in Education and the Arts.Mcdonnell Jane - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):387-400.
    This paper draws on insights from Jacques Rancière's writing on politics and aesthetics to offer new perspectives on debates in education and the arts. The paper addresses three debates in turn; the place of contemporary art in schools and gallery education, the role of art in democratic education and the blurring of boundaries between participatory art and community education. I argue that Rancière's work helps to illuminate some essentialist assumptions behind dichotomous arguments about contemporary art in the classroom—both over-hyped claims (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  1
    On the Meeting of the Moral and the Aesthetic in Literary Education.Andrés Mejía & Silvia Eugenia Montoya - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):370-386.
    For millennia it has been discussed whether literature appropriately can or should be used in education for a moral purpose. Taking as a premise that it can actually be educative and not merely moralising, we tackle the case made against such use, based on the claim that it would be perverting the aesthetic nature of literature as a form of art, as it would be instrumentalised. Given that this claim is based on a dichotomy between an aesthetically educative approach and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  3
    Levinas: Ethics or Mystification?Alistair Miller - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):524-537.
    The metaphysical ethics of Levinas appeals to many philosophers of education because it seems to promise ethics and social justice without recourse to moral norms, ‘totalising’ political systems or religious belief. However, the notion that the subject can be detached from its worldly being—that one can posit a primordial metaphysical pre-conscious pre-phenomenal self which stands in ethical relation to a primordial metaphysical pre-conscious pre-phenomenal Other—is highly questionable. From an empirical perspective, our experience of the world and of ourselves can only (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  4
    Levelling and Misarchism: A Nietzschean Perspective on the Future of Democratic Educational Institutions.Pirc Tadej - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):491-509.
    In his early lectures, published as On the Future of Our Educational Institutions, Nietzsche attempts to expose contemporary education as overly extensive and being weakened, and as such, failing to turn pupils and students into men of culture. The aim of my paper is to present a comprehensive consideration of the present condition of democratic educational institutions through Nietzsche's clairvoyantly pessimistic assessment. I enter the discussion through two Nietzschean concepts, levelling and misarchism, which, although not found in the mentioned text (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. The Educational Importance of Deep Wonder.Anders Schinkel - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):538-553.
    That wonder is educationally important will strike many people as obvious. And in a way it is obvious, because being capable of experiencing wonder implies an openness to experience and seems naturally allied to intrinsic educational motivation, an eagerness to inquire, a desire to understand, and also to a willingness to suspend judgement and bracket existing—potentially limiting—ways of thinking, seeing, and categorising. Yet wonder is not a single thing, and it is important to distinguish at least two kinds of wonder: (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  5
    Knowing ‘Wh’ and Knowing How: Constructing Professional Curricula and Integrating Epistemic Fields.Christopher Winch - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):351-369.
    Much of the debate on the nature of knowing how has been concerned with whether it is to be conceived of as an ability or as the possession of propositional knowledge, perhaps in a practical form. Comparatively little has been written about knowing wh constructions and the ways in which they do or do not fit into this debate. Do such debates have any bearing on the practical concerns of the educators of professionals? This paper considers the case of Knowing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  4
    Confronting the Dark Side of Higher Education.Søren Bengtsen & Ronald Barnett - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):114-131.
    In this paper we philosophically explore the notion of darkness within higher education teaching and learning. Within the present-day discourse of how to make visible and to explicate teaching and learning strategies through alignment procedures and evidence-based intellectual leadership, we argue that dark spots and blind angles grow too. As we struggle to make visible and to evaluate, assess, manage and organise higher education, the darkness of the institution actually expands. We use the term ‘dark’ to comprehend challenges, situations, reactions, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. The Exilic Classroom: Spaces of Subversion.J. Brogan Andrew - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):510-523.
    This paper explores the possibility of the classroom as an exilic space of subversion in which we can pursue anarchist notions of personal transformation, relationships and society. Classroom environments in higher education institutions in Britain, particularly following the introduction of the Teaching Excellence Framework in September 2016, are premised upon relationships shaped by specific external standards: Employability, the instrumental pursuit of degrees, provider/consumer exchange, among others. Any notions of personal transformation are economic, and the broader goal is the pursuit of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  1
    A Confucian Conception of Critical Thinking.T. A. N. Charlene - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):331-343.
    This article proposes a Confucian conception of critical thinking by focussing on the notion of judgement. It is argued that the attainment of the Confucian ideal of li necessitates and promotes critical thinking in at least two ways. First, the observance of li requires the individual to exercise judgement by applying the generalised knowledge, norms and procedures in dao to particular action-situations insightfully and flexibly. Secondly, the individual's judgement, to qualify as an instance of li, should be underpinned and motivated (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  31
    Education, Despair and Morality: A Reply to Roberts.Christopher Cowley - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):298-309.
    In a recent thought-provoking piece, Peter Roberts argues against the central role of happiness as a guiding concept in education, and argues for more attention to be paid to despair. This does not mean cultivating despair in young people, but allowing them to make sense of their own natural occasional despair, as well as the despair of others. I agree with Roberts about happiness, and about the need for more attention to despair, but I argue that focusing too much on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  1
    The Essential Uncertainty of Thinking: Education and Subject in John Dewey.Vasco D'agnese - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):73-88.
    In this paper, I analyse the Deweyan account of thinking and subject and discuss the educational consequences that follow from such an account. I argue that despite the grouping of thinking and reflective thought that has largely appeared in the interpretation of Deweyan work, Dewey discloses an inescapable uncertainty at the core of human thinking. This move is even more challenging given Dewey's firm faith in the power of intelligent action, and in education as the means by which human beings (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  2
    ‘What Makes My Image of Him Into an Image of Him?’: Philosophers on Film and the Question of Educational Meaning.Alexis Gibbs - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):267-280.
    This paper proceeds from the premise that film can be educational in a broader sense than its current use in classrooms for illustrative purposes, and explores the idea that film might function as a form of education in itself. To investigate the phenomenon of film as education, it is necessary to first address a number of assumptions about film, the most important of which is its objective character under study. The objective study of film holds that the meaning of film (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Can ‘Philosophy for Children’ Improve Primary School Attainment?Gorard Stephen, Siddiqui Nadia & S. E. E. Beng Huat - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):5-22.
    There are tensions within formal education between imparting knowledge and the development of skills for handling that knowledge. In the primary school sector, the latter can also be squeezed out of the curriculum by a focus on basic skills such as literacy and numeracy. What happens when an explicit attempt is made to develop young children's reasoning—both in terms of their apparent cognitive abilities and their basic skills? This paper reports an independent evaluation of an in-class intervention called ‘Philosophy for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Can ‘Philosophy for Children’ Improve Primary School Attainment?Stephen Gorard, Nadia Siddiqui & Beng Huat See - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):5-22.
    There are tensions within formal education between imparting knowledge and the development of skills for handling that knowledge. In the primary school sector, the latter can also be squeezed out of the curriculum by a focus on basic skills such as literacy and numeracy. What happens when an explicit attempt is made to develop young children's reasoning—both in terms of their apparent cognitive abilities and their basic skills? This paper reports an independent evaluation of an in-class intervention called ‘Philosophy for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  1
    Aims of Education: How to Resist the Temptation of Technocratic Models.Atli Harðarson - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):59-72.
    A technocratic model of curriculum design that has been highly influential since the middle of last century assumes that the aims of education can be, and should be: 1. Causally brought about by administering educational experiences; 2. Specified as objectives that can be attained, reached or completed; 3. Changes in students that are described in advance. Richard S. Peters argued against the first of these three tenets by making a distinction between aims that are causally brought about by the means (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. The Process Matters: Moral Constraints on Cosmopolitan Education.Matthew J. Hayden - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):248-266.
    Cosmopolitan education aims to transmit cosmopolitan forms of life in order to participate morally in the world community. The primary characteristics of this cosmopolitan education are its acceptance of the shared humanity of all persons as a fact of human existence and as a motivating guide for human interaction, and the requirement of democratic inclusion in deliberations of the governance of those interactions, including morality. Such an education in cosmopolitan morality requires means that befit its core components. This paper contrasts (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  3
    After Friendship.Mary Healy - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):161-176.
    The loss of friendship can be a frequent occurrence for children as they explore their social worlds and navigate their way through the demands of particular relationships. Given that friendship is a relationship of special regard, and associated with a particular partiality to our friends, the ending of friendship and the subsequent interactions between former friends, can be difficult areas for schools to deal with. Whilst there has been considerable research on the formation and maintenance of friendship, a consideration of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  1
    Dewey and Culture: Responding to ‘Extreme Views’.Ruth Heilbronn - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):89-101.
    Dewey famously believed that we learn through experience, through which we build up habits. Education should be about developing good habits. Experience for Dewey, is not an individual possession but grows out of social interaction, which always takes place in a given culture. Dewey's views on culture are significant in relation to a current issue in education in England, namely the legal requirement for teachers to report students who express ‘extreme views’, under the Prevent Strategy. The article first gives the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  1
    Pedagogical Pleasures: Augustine in the Feminist Classroom.Maggie A. Labinski - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):281-297.
    Many feminist philosophers of education have argued that the teacher's pleasure plays an important role in the classroom. However, accessing such pleasure is often easier said than done. Given our current academic climate, how might teachers develop pedagogical practices that cultivate these delights? This article investigates the response to this question offered in Augustine's De catechizandis rudibus. Despite his reputation as a pleasure-hater, Augustine spends the majority of his text defending the delights of teaching. In particular, Augustine argues that if (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  2
    Study Time: Heidegger and the Temporality of Education.Tyson E. Lewis - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):230-247.
    In this article, the author argues that the question of educational time is absolutely essential in contemporary debates concerning the fate of the university. In order to examine the nature of educational time, this article first outlines Heidegger's distinction between temporality and Temporality. Second, the author makes a clarification between inauthentic and authentic learning as two forms of educational temporality. Here the article turns to the work of Hubert Dreyfus and Stuart Dreyfus on expert skill building versus standardised or generic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  5
    Transhuman Education? Sloterdijk's Reading of Heidegger's Letter on Humanism.Long Fiachra - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):177-192.
    Peter Sloterdijk presented a reading of Heidegger's Letter on Humanism at a conference held at Elmau in 1999. Reinterpreting the meaning of humanism in the light of Heidegger's Letter, Sloterdijk focused his presentation on the need to redefine education as a form of genetic ‘taming’ and proposed what seemed to be support for positive eugenics. Although Sloterdijk claimed that he only wanted to open a debate on the issue, he could not have been surprised at the level of opposition this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Moral Education and Literature: On Cora Diamond and Eimear McBride.Áine Mahon - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):102-113.
    I argue in this paper for the rich and subtle connections between moral philosophy and literature as they are articulated and explored in the work of the contemporary American philosopher, Cora Diamond. In its significance for broader educational debates—specifically, debates regarding the value of the arts and humanities in a context of global economic collapse—Diamond's work is strikingly original. I argue that it offers much more to educators than the related work of her Anglo-American contemporaries, among them Martha Nussbaum and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  1
    Levinas: Ethics or Mystification?Miller Alistair - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1).
    The metaphysical ethics of Levinas appeals to many philosophers of education because it seems to promise ethics and social justice without recourse to moral norms, ‘totalising’ political systems or religious belief. However, the notion that the subject can be detached from its worldly being—that one can posit a primordial metaphysical pre-conscious pre-phenomenal self which stands in ethical relation to a primordial metaphysical pre-conscious pre-phenomenal Other—is highly questionable. From an empirical perspective, our experience of the world and of ourselves can only (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  3
    Towards a Transformative Epistemology of Technology Education.Morrison-Love David - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):23-37.
    Technology Education offers an authentic and invaluable range of skills, knowledge, capabilities, contexts and ways of thinking for learners in the 21st century. However, it is recognised that it occupies a comparatively less defined and more fragile curricular position than associated, but longer established, subjects such as Mathematics and Science. While recognising that no single factor lies behind such a condition, this paper draws upon thinking in the philosophy of technology, technology education and the ontology of artefacts to argue that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  51. Towards a Transformative Epistemology of Technology Education.Morrison‐Love David - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):23-37.
    Technology Education offers an authentic and invaluable range of skills, knowledge, capabilities, contexts and ways of thinking for learners in the 21st century. However, it is recognised that it occupies a comparatively less defined and more fragile curricular position than associated, but longer established, subjects such as Mathematics and Science. While recognising that no single factor lies behind such a condition, this paper draws upon thinking in the philosophy of technology, technology education and the ontology of artefacts to argue that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  52.  7
    Environmental Education as a Lived-Body Practice? A Contemplative Pedagogy Perspective.Pulkki Jani, Dahlin Bo & Värri Veli-Matti - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):214-229.
    Environmental education usually appeals to the students’ knowledge and rational understanding. Even though this is needed, there is a neglected aspect of learning ecologically fruitful action; that of the lived-body. This paper introduces the lived-body as an important site for learning ecological action. An argument is made for the need of a biophilia revolution, in which refined experience of the body and enhanced capabilities for sensing are seen as important ways of complementing the more common, knowledge-based environmental education. Alienation from (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  53.  2
    Environmental Education as a Lived‐Body Practice? A Contemplative Pedagogy Perspective.Pulkki Jani, Dahlin Bo & Värri Veli‐Matti - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):214-229.
    Environmental education usually appeals to the students’ knowledge and rational understanding. Even though this is needed, there is a neglected aspect of learning ecologically fruitful action; that of the lived-body. This paper introduces the lived-body as an important site for learning ecological action. An argument is made for the need of a biophilia revolution, in which refined experience of the body and enhanced capabilities for sensing are seen as important ways of complementing the more common, knowledge-based environmental education. Alienation from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  54.  1
    Epistemology in Excess? A Response to Williams.Siegel Harvey - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):193-213.
    Emma Williams’ ‘In Excess of Epistemology’ admirably endeavours to open the way to an account of critical thinking that goes beyond the one I have defended ad nauseum in recent decades by developing, via the work of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger, ‘a radically different conception of thinking and the human being who thinks’, one that ‘does more justice to receptive and responsible conditions of human thought.’ In this response I hope to show that much of Williams’ alternative approach is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  55. Military Education Reconsidered: A Postmodern Update.Anders Mcdonald Sookermany - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):310-330.
    It is commonly accepted that the nature of military operations is one of such character that no matter how well you prepare there will still be an expectation of having to deal with the unknown and unforeseen. Accordingly, there seem to be reasons for arguing that preparations for the unpredictable should play a critical role in military education. Yet, military education as we know it seems to be characterized by a rather classic modernist view on education, which promotes an environment (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  56.  1
    A Confucian Conception of Critical Thinking.Charlene Tan - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):331-343.
    This article proposes a Confucian conception of critical thinking by focussing on the notion of judgement. It is argued that the attainment of the Confucian ideal of li necessitates and promotes critical thinking in at least two ways. First, the observance of li requires the individual to exercise judgement by applying the generalised knowledge, norms and procedures in dao to particular action-situations insightfully and flexibly. Secondly, the individual's judgement, to qualify as an instance of li, should be underpinned and motivated (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  57.  2
    Indoctrination and Social Context: A System‐Based Approach to Identifying the Threat of Indoctrination and the Responsibilities of Educators.Rebecca M. Taylor - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):38-58.
    Debates about indoctrination raise fundamental questions about the ethics of teaching. This paper presents a philosophical analysis of indoctrination, including 1) an account of what indoctrination is and why it is harmful, and 2) a framework for understanding the responsibilities of teachers and other educational actors to avoid its negative outcomes. I respond to prominent outcomes-based accounts of indoctrination, which I argue share two limiting features—a narrow focus on the threat indoctrination poses to knowledge and on the dyadic relationship between (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  58.  1
    Does Critical Thinking and Logic Education Have a Western Bias? The Case of the Nyāya School of Classical Indian Philosophy.Anand Jayprakash Vaidya - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):132-160.
    In this paper I develop a cross-cultural critique of contemporary critical thinking education in the United States, the United Kingdom, and those educational systems that adopt critical thinking education from the standard model used in the US and UK. The cross-cultural critique rests on the idea that contemporary critical thinking textbooks completely ignore contributions from non-western sources, such as those found in the African, Arabic, Buddhist, Jain, Mohist and Nyāya philosophical traditions. The exclusion of these traditions leads to the conclusion (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  59.  13
    Minima Pedagogica: Education, Thinking and Experience in Adorno.Snir Itay - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education (1):1-15.
    This article attempts to think of thinking as the essence of critical education. While contemporary education tends to stress the conveying of knowledge and skills needed to succeed in present-day information society, the present article turns to the work of Theodor W. Adorno to develop alternative thinking about education, thinking, and the political significance of education for thinking. Adorno touched upon educational questions throughout his writings, with growing interest in the last ten years of his life. Education, he argues following (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  60.  8
    An Educational Course and Syllabus to Instruct at the Educational Institutions Regarding the Organizations, Companies, and Associations of the Science Community.Agilan Chandrasegar - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education:03.
    there is possibility to discern the various society of scientific policies in the philosophy those are given below 1)this is the society follows religious skepticism with theism policy 2)this is the society of religious skepticism with ietsism policy 3)the society of religious skepticism policy with agnosticism policy There are various organizations associations foundations and companies around the world to protect and develop these societies and to publicize these scientific policies in the world. In which the government and private companies, associations (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues