8 found

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  1.  2
    Moral Reasons for Individuals in High-Income Countries to Limit Beef Consumption.Jessica Fanzo, Travis N. Rieder, Rebecca McLaren, Ruth Faden, Justin Bernstein & Anne Barnhill - 2022 - Food Ethics 7 (2).
    This paper argues that individuals in many high-income countries typically have moral reasons to limit their beef consumption and consume plant-based protein instead, given the negative effects of beef production and consumption. Beef production is a significant source of agricultural greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental impacts, high levels of beef consumption are associated with health risks, and some cattle production systems raise animal welfare concerns. These negative effects matter, from a variety of moral perspectives, and give us collective moral (...)
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  2. Why Are They Buying It?: United States Consumers’ Intentions When Purchasing Meat, Eggs, and Dairy With Welfare-Related Labels.Daisy Freund, Sharon Pailler & Melissa Thibault - 2022 - Food Ethics 7 (2).
    There is widespread and growing concern among U.S. consumers about the treatment of farmed animals, and consumers are consequently paying attention to food product labels that indicate humane production practices. However, labels vary in their standards for animal welfare, and prior research suggests that consumers are confused by welfare-related labels: many shoppers cannot differentiate between labels that indicate changes in the way animals are raised and those that do not. We administered a survey to 1,000 American grocery shoppers to better (...)
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  3.  1
    A Personal Editorial From the Editor-in-Chief: Food Ethics in Times of War.Matthias Kaiser - 2022 - Food Ethics 7 (2).
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  4.  1
    Obituary for Anne Agerkrog Algers.Helena Röcklinsberg & Matthias Kaiser - 2022 - Food Ethics 7 (2).
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  5.  3
    Pragmatism and the Fixation of 21st Century Food Beliefs.Prisca Augustyn - 2022 - Food Ethics 7 (1).
    What to eat is a question of everyday life. What food to grow has become an important issue of political and scientific debate. Using Charles Sanders Peirce’s famous essay on The Fixation of Belief, this paper examines what food habits we hold with tenacity, which beliefs about what to eat are imposed on us by authority, when our choices are based on a priori reasoning, and where we rely on scientific logic when we choose food. Based on Peirce’s early pragmatist (...)
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  6.  1
    Food, Gentrification and Located Life Plans.Anne Barnhill & Matteo Bonotti - 2022 - Food Ethics 7 (1).
    Even though the phenomenon of gentrification is ever-growing in contemporary urban contexts, especially in high income countries, it has been mostly overlooked by normative political theorists and philosophers. In this paper we examine the normative dimensions of gentrification through the lens of food. By drawing on Huber and Wolkenstein’s work, we use food as an example to illustrate the multiple ways in which life plans can be located and to argue that both existing residents and newcomers have an interest in (...)
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  7.  12
    New Omnivorism: A Novel Approach to Food and Animal Ethics.Christopher Bobier & Josh Milburn - 2022 - Food Ethics 7 (1).
    New omnivorism is a term coined by Andy Lamey to refer to arguments that – paradoxically – our duties towards animals require us to eat some animal products. Lamey’s claim to have identified a new, distinctive position in food ethics is problematic, however, for some of his interlocutors are not new, not distinctive, and not obviously concerned with eating animals. It is the aim of this paper to bolster Lamey’s argument that he has identified a novel, unified, and intriguing position (...)
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  8.  5
    Containing Hunger, Contesting Injustice? Exploring the Transnational Growth of Foodbanking- and Counter-Responses- Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Andy Fisher, Kayleigh Garthwaite & Charlotte Spring - 2022 - Food Ethics 7 (1).
    COVID-19 caused levels of household food insecurity to spike, but the precarity of so many people in wealthy countries is an outgrowth of decades of eroding public provisions and labour protections that once protected people from hunger, setting the stage for the virus’ unevenly-distributed harms. The prominence of corporate-sponsored foodbanking as a containment response to pandemic-aggravated food insecurity follows decades of replacing rights with charity. We review structural drivers of charity’s growth to prominence as a hunger solution in North America, (...)
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