Year:

  1.  15
    The Human Right to Health: A Defense.Nicole Hassoun - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):158-179.
  2.  12
    Citizens' Autonomy and Corporate Cultural Power.Lisa Herzog - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):205-230.
  3.  6
    Ignorance‐Based Justifications for Amnesty.Patrick Lenta - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):283-302.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  4.  24
    Whose Lives Matter? The Black Lives Matter Movement and the Contested Legacy of Philosophical Humanism.Andrew J. Pierce - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):261-282.
  5.  9
    The Claimability Condition: Rights as Action‐Guiding Standards.Cristián Rettig - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):322-340.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  6.  5
    Virtue Ethics and Political Authority.Tristan J. Rogers - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):303-321.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  7.  5
    Value, Externalities, and the Boundaries of the Market.Andrew Stark - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):180-204.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  8.  12
    A Revisionist Theory of Racism: Rejecting the Presumption of Conservatism.Alberto G. Urquidez - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):1-30.
    Many theories of racism presuppose that ordinary usage of the term “racism” should be preserved. Rarely is this presupposition—the presumption of conservatism—defended. This paper discusses the work of Lawrence Blum, Joshua Glasgow, Jorge Garcia, Tommie Shelby, and others, in order to develop a critique of the presumption of conservatism. Against this presumption, I defend the following desideratum: If ordinary usage of “racism” prompts significant practical difficulties that can be averted by revising ordinary usage, then this counts as a mark against (...)
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  9.  22
    Liberalism, Neutrality, and the Child's Right to an Open Future.Frank Dietrich - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (1):104-128.
    The child’s right to an open future aims at protecting the autonomy of the mature person into which a child will normally develop. The justification of state interventions into parental decisions which unduly restrict the options of the prospective adult has to address the problem that the value of autonomy is highly contested in modern pluralist societies. The article argues that the modern majority culture provides young adults with many more options than traditionalist religious communities. However, the options that can (...)
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  10.  9
    A Liberal Egalitarian Perspective on the Platform Economy: Mitigating its Distributive Effects or Changing the Organizations Running It?Thomas Ferretti - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (1):54-79.
  11.  20
    Democratic Patterns of Interaction as a Norm for the Workplace.Roberto Frega - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (1):27-53.
  12.  14
    The Place of Intellectual Self‐Trust in Theories of Epistemic Advantages.Nadja El Kassar - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (1):7-26.
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  13.  6
    Built Power and the Politics of Nonhuman Rights.Joshua Mousie - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (1):80-103.
  14.  78
    Groups with Minds of Their Own Making.Leo Townsend - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (1):129-151.
    According Philip Pettit, suitably organised groups not only possess ‘minds of their own’ but can also ‘make up their minds’ and 'speak for themselves'--where these two capacities enable them to perform as conversable subjects or 'persons'. In this paper I critically examine Pettit's case for group personhood. My first step is to reconstruct his account, explaining first how he understands the two capacities he considers central to personhood – the capacity to ‘make up one’s mind’, and the capacity to ‘speak (...)
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