Year:

  1.  6
    The Phenomenon of Ego-Splitting in Husserl’s Phenomenology of Pure Phantasy.Marco Cavallaro - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (2):162-177.
    Husserl’s phenomenology of imagination embraces a cluster of different theories and approaches regarding the multi-faced phenomenon of imaginative experience. In this paper I consider one aspect that seems to be crucial to the understanding of a particular form of imagination that Husserl names pure phantasy. I argue that the phenomenon of Ego-splitting discloses the best way to elucidate the peculiarity of pure phantasy with respect to other forms of representative acts and to any simple form of act modification. First, I (...)
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  2.  3
    Sartre, The Condemned of Altona and the Critique of Dialectical Reason-to-Come: Insanity or Bad Faith Running Away with Itself?Adrian Mirvish - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (2):135-148.
    What for Sartre happens when bad faith goes so deep that one is no longer master of it? In The Condemned of Altona, Franz Gerlach, after an initial show of resistance, joins the Nazi cause and tortures prisoners of war in his charge. Fleeing home from Russia at the war’s end, he sequesters himself in the attic of the family mansion and attempts to absorb the guilt of the twentieth century by frantically arguing his case before a tribunal of scuttling (...)
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  3.  3
    Sartre’s Dialectical Methodology.David Sherman - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (2):116-134.
    Sartre’s intention in the Critique of Dialectical Reason is to establish the heuristic value of the dialectical method when applied to the social sciences. Toward this end, he furnishes an account of how, on the basis of natural needs, rational choices, burgeoning social ensembles, natural and social contingencies and unintended consequences, human beings make their history. I shall argue that his dialectical method, especially when modified, opens up interesting possibilities for clarifying the two most important and enduring meta-issues in the (...)
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  4. “After You, Sir!”: Substitution in Kant and Levinas.Daniel Smith - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (2):149-161.
    This paper compares the later Levinas’ notion of “substitution” with Kant’s account of substitution in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. Kant’s account is modelled on the Christian doctrine of the vicarious substitution of Christ, and some recent commentators on Levinas have argued that Levinas’ account is also similar to this Christian doctrine. By bringing out what I see as major differences between the two accounts, I show that Levinas’ notion of substitution should not be understood in this way.
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  5.  3
    Phenomenology as the Original Science of Life in Heidegger’s Early Freiburg Lectures.Lee Michael Badger - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):28-43.
    ABSTRACTThe aim of this essay is to introduce an original and radical phenomenology of life into Heidegger’s earliest lectures at Freiburg University that stands independently from and in contrast to fundamental ontology. The motivation behind this aim lies in the exclusion of life from the existential analytic of Dasein despite Heidegger’s preoccupation with the question of life during this very early period. Principally, the essay demonstrates how Husserl’s phenomenological insight into the intentionality of life has the potential to be transformed (...)
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  6.  1
    Using Mise En Abyme to Differentiate Deleuze and Derrida.Iddo Dickmann - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):63-80.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper I shall tackle the problem of differentiating Deleuze and Derrida. Various writers have done so, comparing these philosophers’ conceptions of repetition and difference. I shall attempt to enrich, sharpen and sometimes criticize these writers by exploring the paradigm through which Deleuze and Derrida have reflected upon repetition and difference in the first place: the mise en abyme, a literary concept designating a work that doubles itself within itself. I shall argue that Derrida applied to his theory of (...)
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  7.  2
    Lévinas, Derrida and the Ethics and Politics of Reproduction.Mihail Evans - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):44-62.
    ABSTRACTThis essay outlines a Lévinas- and Derrida-inspired politics of reproduction, via opening the ethics of reproduction, something previous work on the topic has omitted. It does so via a reassessment of two notable publications on Lévinas and feminism, Stella Sandford’s essay in the Cambridge Companion to Lévinas and Lisa Guenther’s volume The Gift of the Other: Lévinas and the Politics of Reproduction.11 Stella Sandford, ‘Lévinas, Feminism and the Feminine’. I particularly focus on this essay as its negative presentation of Lévinas’ (...)
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  8.  5
    The Risk of Freedom: Ethics, Phenomenology and Politics in Jan Patočka.Lorenzo Girardi - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):81-83.
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  9.  2
    Kierkegaard, Eve and Metaphors of Birth.Rasmus Rosenberg Larson - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):83-86.
  10.  9
    Body Dysmorphia and the Phenomenology of Embodiment.David Mitchell - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):16-27.
    ABSTRACTThis paper explores the relationship between phenomenology and body dysmorphia. This is, to explain, a disorder in which the sufferer perceives, and is obsessed by, defects in appearance which are either non-existent or severely exaggerated. I will see how Husserl’s and Sartre’s analyses of embodiment can explain the radical uncertainty, and anxiety, about appearance that underscores this condition. Their accounts of the body-as-lived reveal first of all an essential intimacy between body and self that the “objective”, material, view of the (...)
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  11.  3
    Kierkegaard and the Matter of Philosophy: A Fractured Dialectic.Erin Plunkett - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):88-90.
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  12.  3
    Orientation & Judgment in Hermeneutics.Frank Schalow - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):86-88.
  13.  1
    The New Demons: Rethinking Power and Evil Today.Francesco Tava - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):90-94.
  14. Georges Bataille: The Sacred and Society.Simon D. Trub - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):94-97.
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  15.  4
    A Philosophy of Weakness: Merleau-Ponty on Fugitive Love and the Wisdom in Letting Die.Keith Whitmoyer - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):1-15.
    ABSTRACTThis essay provides a sketch of Merleau-Ponty’s understanding of love in relation to human experience and to the conceptualization of φιλία and σοφία outlined in his later works. In response to what he calls a “cruel thought … that is more fear of error than it is a love of truth”, Merleau-Ponty’s reflections on love and jealousy in Proust offer a concept of “fugitive love”. Opposed to the Cartesian desire for apodicticity that seeks to seize and arrest, fugitive love means (...)
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  16.  5
    Negativity, Finitude, and the Leap in Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy.Niall Keane - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (4):309-328.
    ABSTRACTThis article examines Heidegger's assessment of negativity and finitude in the late 1930s and his enlargement of these issues in the name of a leap from one type of philosophy, one type of beginning, to a wholly other beginning. The guiding concerns of this article are negativity, finitude and the leap, and how these overlapping concerns coalesce around Heidegger's attempts to move towards a wholly other type of philosophy; in fact, one which no longer understands itself to be philosophy at (...)
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  17.  8
    From Kant to Heidegger. On the Path From Self-Consciousness to Self-Understanding.Claus Langbehn - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (4):329-346.
    ABSTRACTIn this article I explore the idea that Heidegger's lectures on The Basic Problems of Phenomenology are of particular importance to our understanding of the relationship between Heidegger and Kant. These lectures can be read as a “historical” commentary on Being and Time. Of course, Heidegger does not present himself as a historian of philosophy, but acts as a philosophical reader of Kant in order to expound the principal ideas of his own philosophy. My central claim is that it is (...)
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  18.  8
    The Sense of Life – Jean-Luc Nancy and Emmanuel Lévinas.Nicole Paula Maria Note - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (4):347-361.
    ABSTRACTMetaphysics has long been regarded as providing meaning to the world. Subsequent progressive replacement attempts of this narrative by a scientific approach have generally led to a view of life as being void of meaning. However, this has not affected the quest for meaning or for an understanding of this meaning, despite an increasing societal neglect of the importance of its pursuit. This article aims to contribute to a philosophical understanding of the sense of life in the world, drawing on (...)
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  19.  3
    Difference and Repetition, An Edinburgh Philosophical Guide.Corry Shores - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (4):364-366.
  20.  3
    Levinas, Europe and Others: The Postcolonial Challenge to Alterity.Louis Blond - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (3):260-275.
    ABSTRACTThe article assesses a postcolonial critique of Emmanuel Levinas’ thought. Levinas’ work has recently been accused of Eurocentrism, racism and xenophobia; those accusations are supported by recorded interviews, which at times voice bigoted and xenophobic remarks. What postcolonial critics suggest is that these remarks are made possible by Levinas’ philosophical commitments to phenomenology and Europe as an intellectual process. The article gives an assessment of the postcolonial critique and argues that the critique is necessitous but incomplete and extends a uniformity (...)
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  21.  2
    Europe and the Stranger.Rodolphe Gasché - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (3):292-305.
    ABSTRACTWith few exceptions, the prominent role of the Stranger in Plato’s late dialogue on the Sophist has drawn little attention in Plato scholarship. Yet, in this dialogue Plato charges the expatriated Stranger, who, furthermore, lacks a patronym and thus is not identifiable, remaining a stranger to the end, with the task not only of rejecting all philosophy hitherto as nothing more than a kind of storytelling about Being, but also of committing the parricide of Parmenides, the father of Greek philosophy (...)
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  22.  3
    Nietzsche’s Europe: An Experimental Anticipation of the Future.Simon Glendinning - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (3):276-291.
    ABSTRACTLike Kant a little over a hundred years earlier, Nietzsche saw the history of Europe as moving towards the formation of an integrated political union. Unlike Kant, however, Nietzsche does not see this development as an unambiguous good. Kant had supposed that European integration would belong to a history of constitutional improvements that would make war between what we would now call “democratic” states in Europe increasingly less likely. Nietzsche also sees it as part of a process of democratization, but (...)
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  23.  1
    Europe: A Postulate of Phenomenological Reason.Kenneth Knies - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (3):210-225.
    ABSTRACTThis paper presents Husserl’s concept of Europe as a postulate of phenomenological reason. I begin by showing that a certain interpretation of history is necessary in order for phenomenology to be possible as science. I then show how Husserl’s concept of Europe enables this interpretation. Working with a general definition of postulation that brings Husserl into conversation with Kant, I examine the motives and truth conditions for asserting that Europe is what Husserl claims it to be. I highlight the critical (...)
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  24.  1
    European Institutions?Darian Meacham - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (3):226-241.
    ABSTRACTThe aim of this article is to sketch a phenomenological theory of political institutions and to apply it to some objections and questions raised by Pierre Manent about the project of the European Union and more specifically the question of “European Construction”, i.e. what is the aim of the European Project. Such a theory of political institutions is nested within a broader phenomenological account of institutions, dimensions of which I have tried to elaborate elsewhere. As a working conceptual delineation, we (...)
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  25.  2
    Phenomenology and the Idea of Europe: Introductory Remarks.Francesco Tava - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (3):205-209.
    Ïntroductory remarks to the Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology Special Issue "Phenomenology and the Idea of Europe".
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  26. The Brave Struggle: Jan Patočka on Europe’s Past and Future.Francesco Tava - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (3):242-259.
    This article proposes to investigate Jan Patočka’s idea of “post-Europe”, in the context of his understanding of European contemporary history. Therefore, I first stress how important it is for Patočka to conceive a “post-European perspective”, i.e. a peculiar insight into historical problems and conflicts that would allow humanity to find a possible path out of the condition that characterizes the twentieth century. Second, I focus on the existential figure that, according to Patočka, is capable of engendering this perspective, and whose (...)
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  27.  4
    Heidegger's Jews: Inclusion/Exclusion and Heidegger's Anti-Semitism.Babette Babich - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (2):133-156.
  28.  28
    Technological Fictions and Personal Identity: On Ricoeur, Schechtman and Analytic Thought Experiments.Simon Beck - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (2):117-132.
    Paul Ricoeur and Marya Schechtman express grave doubts about the acceptability and informativeness of the thought-experiments employed by analytic philosophers (notably Derek Parfit) in the debate about personal identity, and for what appear to be related reasons. I consider their reasoning and argue that their reasons fail to justify their doubts. I go on to argue that, from this discussion of possible problems concerning select thought-experiments, something positive can be learned about personal identity.
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  29.  3
    The Government of Desire: A Genealogical Perspective.Miguel de Beistegui - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (2):190-203.
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  30.  2
    Levinas and the Possibility of Dialogue with “Strangers”.Benda Hofmeyr - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (2):174-189.
  31.  4
    Heidegger, the Pólis, the Political and Gelassenheit.Tracy B. Strong - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (2):157-173.
  32.  76
    Hegelian Identity.Ioannis Trisokkas - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (2):98-116.
    In his article “Hegelian Identity,” Trisokkas examines the dialectic of identity and difference in the second chapter of Section One of Book Two of Hegel’s Science of Logic, “The Determinations of Reflection.” Trisokkas initially shows that Hegel understands identity as having its truth in contradiction. He then explains that Hegel understands contradiction in two ways. Ordinarily, a contradiction occurs when a quality or quantity (F) and its contradictory (not F) are predicated of the same thing (A). However, for Hegel, contradiction (...)
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  33.  5
    Identity and Difference.Rafael Winkler & Abraham Olivier - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (2):95-97.
  34. Know It While You Have It: The Ontological Condition of a Cancelled Advertisement.William Large - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (1):72-86.
    ABSTRACTIt is well known that advertising and branding co-opts counter culture to sell commodities, but in this article we uncover the ontological conditions for such an appropriation. We investigate a particular example of contemporary advertising, the Levis commercial “Legacy – Now is our Time“, which was subsequently pulled because of the British riots of that year, as a historical situated and saturated moment. This article employs Benjamin's notion of the phantasmagoria to uncover the messianic possibilities of a future hidden in (...)
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  35.  1
    The Nudity of the Ego. An Eckhartian Perspective on the Levinas/Derrida Debate on Alterity.Martina Roesner - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (1):33-55.
    ABSTRACTThe present paper examines the Eckhartian motives in Derrida's critique of Levinas’ concept of the “Other”. The focus is put on the Husserlian concept of alter ego that is at the core of the debate between Levinas and Derrida. Against Levinas, Derrida argues that alter is not an epithet that expresses a mere accidental modification of the ego, but an indicator of radical exteriority. Interestingly enough, this position is virtually identical with Meister Eckhart's interpretation of the famous proposition from Exodus (...)
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  36.  8
    Normative Embodiment. The Role of the Body in Foucault's Genealogy. A Phenomenological Re-Reading.Maren Wehrle - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (1):56-71.
    ABSTRACTIn Foucault's later works, experience and embodiment become important for explaining the normative constitution of the subject: for norms to be effective, discourses are insufficient – they must be experienced and embodied. Practices of “discipline” inscribe power constellations and discourses into subjective experience and bodies. In his lectures on the Hermeneutics of the Subject, he turns this “violent” form of normative embodiment into an ethical perspective by referring to the Stoic tradition. Even though Foucault never developed a notion of experience (...)
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