Year:

  1.  5
    Husserl’s Early Semiotics and Number Signs: Philosophy of Arithmetic Through the Lens of “On the Logic of Signs ”.Thomas Byrne - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (4):287-303.
    This paper demonstrates that Edmund Husserl’s frequently overlooked 1890 manuscript, “On the Logic of Signs,” when closely investigated, reveals itself to be the hermeneutical touchstone for his seminal 1891 Philosophy of Arithmetic. As the former comprises Husserl’s earliest attempt to account for all of the different kinds of signitive experience, his conclusions there can be directly applied to the latter, which is focused on one particular type of sign; namely, number signs. Husserl’s 1890 descriptions of motivating and replacing signs will (...)
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  2.  1
    Phenomenological Metaphysics as a Speculative Realism.Lorenzo Girardi - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (4):336-349.
    The debate between speculative realism and phenomenology has become quite heated over the past years. The matter of contention is the possibility of a metaphysics that can provide knowledge of reality as it is in itself. The speculative realists accuse phenomenology of denying this possibility, confining knowledge to the sphere of subjectivity. What has been overlooked in this debate is the similarity between the speculative project of Quentin Meillassoux and a Husserlian metaphysics. This article looks at these positions from a (...)
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  3.  5
    What Can We Do with Heidegger in the Twenty-First Century?Christos Hadjioannou - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (4):350-359.
    The past two years have been eventful for Heidegger scholarship. Heidegger’s Black Notebooks from the 1930s were published (GA94–96), exposing his antisemitism in a new way, and reigniting several debates. The question that mattered most was whether his philosophy – rather than the person – was inherently antisemitic. If yes: should we continue reading and teaching Heidegger in the twenty-first century?
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  4.  2
    The Flesh of Images, Images of Flesh: Merleau-Ponty Forwarded.A. Johnson Galen - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (4):360-367.
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  5.  1
    There’s Difference and Then There’s Difference.Adam Katz - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (4):368-373.
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  6. Art as the Silence of the World. An Attempt at a Phenomenological Interpretation.Luks Leo - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (4):275-286.
    This paper provides an analysis of the paradoxical definition of art as the silence of the world, as presented in Maurice Blanchot’s The Space of Literature. The definition is analysed phenomenologically, by treating the world as the universal horizon of all experiences. The paper presents two possible interpretations of Blanchot’s statement. First, a possibility is considered that, according to Blanchot, in genuine artistic experience the mundane everyday life falls silent, and an autonomous fictional world opens up. The paper argues that (...)
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  7.  2
    Bergson & Lévinas on the Genealogy of Mind.Paley Miguel José - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (4):304-318.
    This paper presents the influence that Bergson’s theory of subjectivity had on Lévinas. We start by examining Bergson’s “centripetal theory of mind.” Considering the relationship between perception and action, Bergson develops an understanding of subjectivity as a process that unifies disparate perceptions. Guided by the body, this unifying principle is deemed affective. This being done, we then present a contradiction in Bergson’s thinking: While humans are described as different in kind from other animals, the framework used to determine the nature (...)
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  8.  3
    Heideggerian Ethics and Kantian Ethics: Diverging Interpretations in Contemporary French Debate.Luca Serafini - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (4):319-335.
    The purpose of this paper is to show how the interaction between Kantian ethics and some aspects of Heideggerian philosophy can lead to the model of a subject in immediate relationship with others and with his or her community. The positions of Jean-Luc Nancy and Jacques Derrida on this question are presented in contrast with those of Alain Renaut and Emmanuel Lévinas to elucidate their differing ways of interpreting the relationship between Kant and Heidegger with regard to ethics, apriorism, and (...)
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  9.  4
    Out of the Cave of the Cyclops.John Arthos - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (3):186-197.
    Despite the deep respect that readers continue to discover in the great twentieth-century texts of hermeneutics, the academic career and reputation of Gadamer's philosophical version has fallen into the shadows; it seems a long time since the heady days that it could claim universality as an intellectual koiné. This decline is a genuine shame, because at the peak of its reputation it held out the promise of returning the power of humanistic judgement to greater recognition against the domination of method (...)
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  10.  1
    Universality Without Domain: The Ontology of Hermeneutical Practice.Gaetano Chiurazzi - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (3):198-208.
    Hermeneutic rationality arises from the idea that experience is a cumulative process, in which differences are not eliminated but preserved. The universality which derives from this process is an “intensional universality”, which follows a law of direct proportionality between extension and intension: the more an educated individual enriches her experiences, the more she is able to universalize her understanding of others. Experience is then inevitably open and never closed, that is, free for other experiences. If we use the word “domain” (...)
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  11.  5
    The Future of Hermeneutics.Nicholas Davey - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (3):209-221.
    This paper argues that the negativity of hermeneutic experience is revelatory for the following reasons. Hermeneutic failure is not the equivalent of making an erroneous step in a closed circuit of reasoning. Neither is it a refutation. It concerns becoming conscious of an omission, an oversight, an unjustifiable claim to completeness and even the displacement of one interpretation by another more suggestive. The negative dimension of hermeneutic failure is incontrovertibly connected with becoming progressively aware of how, contrary to expectations, a (...)
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  12.  1
    Philosophical Hermeneutics and Ontology.Nicholas Davey - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (3):179-185.
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  13.  1
    Causality, Action and Effective History. Remarks on Gadamer, von Wright and Others.Jan-Ivar Lindén - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (3):222-239.
    Hermeneutics should take Gadamer’s claims about experience and reality seriously, the hermeneutic urgency, described in the following concise ways: aus der Wahrheit des Erinnerns etwas entgegensetzen: das immer noch und immer wieder Wirkliche. WuM, p. XXVIeine Erfahrung, die Wirklichkeit erfährt und selber wirklich ist. WuM, p. 329.Die Erfahrung lehrt, Wirkliches anzuerkennen. WuM, p. 339.preceded by a general remark about the aim of historical knowledge:eine Erkenntnis, die versteht, daß etwas so ist, weil sie versteht, daß es so gekommen ist. WuM, p. (...)
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  14.  5
    Gadamer and Scholz on Solidarity: Disclosing, Avowing, and Performing Solidaristic Ties with Human and Natural Others.Cynthia R. Nielsen - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (3):240-256.
    This essay is concerned with Gadamer’s reflections on solidarity and practice as found in several of his later writings. While Gadamer offers a robust explanation of practice, practical reason, and how both are operative in solidarities, his investigations of solidarity are in no way systematic. He does, however, distinguish two aspects of solidarity, viz. what one might call “natural solidarity” and “avowed solidarity”. In contrast to natural solidarities, avowed solidarities require an intentional decision and commitment to act with others for (...)
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  15.  3
    Practical Hermeneutics: The Legal Text and Beyond.George H. Taylor - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (3):257-274.
    This article attempts to show the continuing practical relevance of hermeneutics through the example of legal interpretation. The article begins with the very concrete nature of legal hermeneutics that forms everyday legal practice – the interrelation of meaning and application – and expands at a more theoretical to show how legal hermeneutics, and hermeneutics more generally, offers what Ricoeur calls an interpretive “choice in favor of meaning.” The choice in favour of meaning underscores the restorative character of hermeneutics that legal (...)
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  16.  45
    The Phenomenon of Ego-Splitting in Husserl’s Phenomenology of Pure Phantasy.Marco Cavallaro - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (2):162-177.
    Husserl’s phenomenology of imagination embraces a cluster of different theories and approaches regarding the multi-faced phenomenon of imaginative experience. In this paper I consider one aspect that seems to be crucial to the understanding of a particular form of imagination that Husserl names pure phantasy. I argue that the phenomenon of Ego-splitting discloses the best way to elucidate the peculiarity of pure phantasy with respect to other forms of representative acts and to any simple form of act modification. First, I (...)
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  17.  4
    Sartre, The Condemned of Altona and the Critique of Dialectical Reason-to-Come: Insanity or Bad Faith Running Away with Itself?Adrian Mirvish - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (2):135-148.
    What for Sartre happens when bad faith goes so deep that one is no longer master of it? In The Condemned of Altona, Franz Gerlach, after an initial show of resistance, joins the Nazi cause and tortures prisoners of war in his charge. Fleeing home from Russia at the war’s end, he sequesters himself in the attic of the family mansion and attempts to absorb the guilt of the twentieth century by frantically arguing his case before a tribunal of scuttling (...)
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  18.  2
    Speaking After the Phenomenon: The Promise of Things and the Future of Phenomenology.Felix Ó Murchadha - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (2):99-115.
    Phenomenology speaks not directly of phenomena but rather of the appearing of phenomena. In so speaking it moves from the level of things with generic or proper names to the level of universal terms. In speaking and thinking the phenomenon Phenomenology comes “after” in the twofold sense of being too late and desiring for that which is to come. This paper explores this place of phenomenology with respect to the relation of faith and reason, the manner of speaking phenomenologically and (...)
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  19.  10
    Sartre’s Dialectical Methodology.David Sherman - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (2):116-134.
    Sartre’s intention in the Critique of Dialectical Reason is to establish the heuristic value of the dialectical method when applied to the social sciences. Toward this end, he furnishes an account of how, on the basis of natural needs, rational choices, burgeoning social ensembles, natural and social contingencies and unintended consequences, human beings make their history. I shall argue that his dialectical method, especially when modified, opens up interesting possibilities for clarifying the two most important and enduring meta-issues in the (...)
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  20.  1
    “After You, Sir!”: Substitution in Kant and Levinas.Daniel Smith - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (2):149-161.
    This paper compares the later Levinas’ notion of “substitution” with Kant’s account of substitution in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. Kant’s account is modelled on the Christian doctrine of the vicarious substitution of Christ, and some recent commentators on Levinas have argued that Levinas’ account is also similar to this Christian doctrine. By bringing out what I see as major differences between the two accounts, I show that Levinas’ notion of substitution should not be understood in this way.
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  21.  7
    Phenomenology as the Original Science of Life in Heidegger’s Early Freiburg Lectures.Lee Michael Badger - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):28-43.
    The aim of this essay is to introduce an original and radical phenomenology of life into Heidegger’s earliest lectures at Freiburg University. The motivation behind this aim lies in the exclusion of life from the existential analytic despite Heidegger’s preoccupation with the question of life during this very early period. Principally, the essay demonstrates how Husserl’s phenomenological insight into the intentionality of life has the potential to be transformed into a living aporia. Although this demonstration is set within the general (...)
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  22.  1
    Using Mise En Abyme to Differentiate Deleuze and Derrida.Iddo Dickmann - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):63-80.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper I shall tackle the problem of differentiating Deleuze and Derrida. Various writers have done so, comparing these philosophers’ conceptions of repetition and difference. I shall attempt to enrich, sharpen and sometimes criticize these writers by exploring the paradigm through which Deleuze and Derrida have reflected upon repetition and difference in the first place: the mise en abyme, a literary concept designating a work that doubles itself within itself. I shall argue that Derrida applied to his theory of (...)
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  23.  3
    Lévinas, Derrida and the Ethics and Politics of Reproduction.Mihail Evans - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):44-62.
    ABSTRACTThis essay outlines a Lévinas- and Derrida-inspired politics of reproduction, via opening the ethics of reproduction, something previous work on the topic has omitted. It does so via a reassessment of two notable publications on Lévinas and feminism, Stella Sandford’s essay in the Cambridge Companion to Lévinas and Lisa Guenther’s volume The Gift of the Other: Lévinas and the Politics of Reproduction.11 Stella Sandford, ‘Lévinas, Feminism and the Feminine’. I particularly focus on this essay as its negative presentation of Lévinas’ (...)
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  24.  6
    The Risk of Freedom: Ethics, Phenomenology and Politics in Jan Patočka.Lorenzo Girardi - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):81-83.
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  25.  2
    Kierkegaard, Eve and Metaphors of Birth.Rasmus Rosenberg Larson - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):83-86.
  26.  15
    Body Dysmorphia and the Phenomenology of Embodiment.David Mitchell - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):16-27.
    ABSTRACTThis paper explores the relationship between phenomenology and body dysmorphia. This is, to explain, a disorder in which the sufferer perceives, and is obsessed by, defects in appearance which are either non-existent or severely exaggerated. I will see how Husserl’s and Sartre’s analyses of embodiment can explain the radical uncertainty, and anxiety, about appearance that underscores this condition. Their accounts of the body-as-lived reveal first of all an essential intimacy between body and self that the “objective”, material, view of the (...)
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  27.  3
    Kierkegaard and the Matter of Philosophy: A Fractured Dialectic.Erin Plunkett - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):88-90.
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  28.  4
    Orientation & Judgment in Hermeneutics.Frank Schalow - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):86-88.
  29.  2
    The New Demons: Rethinking Power and Evil Today.Francesco Tava - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):90-94.
  30. Georges Bataille: The Sacred and Society.Simon D. Trub - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):94-97.
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  31.  4
    A Philosophy of Weakness: Merleau-Ponty on Fugitive Love and the Wisdom in Letting Die.Keith Whitmoyer - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):1-15.
    ABSTRACTThis essay provides a sketch of Merleau-Ponty’s understanding of love in relation to human experience and to the conceptualization of φιλία and σοφία outlined in his later works. In response to what he calls a “cruel thought … that is more fear of error than it is a love of truth”, Merleau-Ponty’s reflections on love and jealousy in Proust offer a concept of “fugitive love”. Opposed to the Cartesian desire for apodicticity that seeks to seize and arrest, fugitive love means (...)
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