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  1.  10
    Husserl’s Noetics – Towards a Phenomenological Epistemology.Philipp Berghofer - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (2):120-138.
    ABSTRACTFor Husserl, noetics is the most fundamental science and the centrepiece of a phenomenological epistemology. Since in his major works Husserl does not develop noetics systematically but uses its main ideas and achievements often in apparent isolation without clarifying their systematic unity, the significance of noetics is often overlooked. Although Husserl has repeatedly stressed the importance of a phenomenological epistemology, what the concrete theses of such an undertaking are supposed to be often remains obscure. We shall see that the best (...)
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  2.  5
    Embodiment and Animality.Cristian Ciocan - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (2):87-103.
    The aim of this article is to examine the problematic frontier that separates the phenomenology of the body and the phenomenology of animality. The main difficulty is to differentiate phenomenologically not only between embodiment and animality, but also between specifically human embodied experience and what is accessible to us through empathy in relation to the corporeality of the animal. I will tackle these questions by considering relevant textual material from the writings of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger. On the one (...)
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  3.  4
    Breaking Away From the Theoretical: Von Herrmann on Husserl and Heidegger.Christopher Edwards - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (2):139-153.
    ABSTRACTIn his book, Hermeneutics and Reflection, Friedrich-Wilhelm von Herrmann outlines what he sees as the fundamental differences between Edmund Husserl’s “theoretical” phenomenology and Martin Heidegger’s “a-theoretical” phenomenology, which he frames in terms of the distinction between “reflective observation” and “hermeneutic understanding”. In this paper, I will clarify the sense of these terms in order to elucidate some of the crucial similarities and differences between Husserl and Heidegger. Against von Herrmann’s characterization of the Husserlian project, I argue that we should not (...)
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  4.  2
    Who Is the Subject of Phenomenology? Husserl and Fink on the Transcendental Ego.D. J. Hobbs - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (2):154-169.
    ABSTRACTOne long-running conundrum in Husserlian phenomenology revolves around the question of the identity of what Husserl calls the transcendental ego, a mysterious figure that he identifies as the subject of a genuinely transcendental phenomenology. In dialogue with both Husserl and his assistant and collaborator Eugen Fink, I attempt in this article to give a solid account of the identity of this transcendental ego, and in particular to explain the connection between this figure and the empirical ego of the individual phenomenologist. (...)
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  5.  4
    Lesson of Darkness: Phenomenology and Lyotard’s Late Aesthetics.Ashley Woodward - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (2):104-119.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines the relationship of Jean-François Lyotard’s aesthetics to phenomenology, especially the works of Mikel Dufrenne and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. It argues that this comparison allows a greater understanding of Lyotard’s late aesthetic writings, which can appear gnomic and which have received relatively little critical attention. Lyotard credits Merleau-Ponty with opening the theme of difference in the aesthetic field, yet believes that the phenomenological approach can never adequately account for it. After outlining Lyotard’s early critiques of Dufrenne and Merleau-Ponty, the (...)
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  6.  5
    A Phenomenological Grounding of Feminist Ethics.Anya Daly - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (1):1-18.
    ABSTRACTThe central hypothesis of this paper is that the phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty offers significant philosophical groundwork for an ethics that honours key feminist commitments – embodiment, situatedness, diversity and the intrinsic sociality of subjectivity. Part I evaluates feminist criticisms of Merleau-Ponty. Part II defends the claim that Merleau-Ponty’s non-dualist ontology underwrites leading approaches in feminist ethics, notably Care Ethics and the Ethics of Vulnerability. Part III examines Merleau-Ponty’s analyses of embodied percipience, arguing that these offer a powerful critique of the (...)
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  7.  7
    Heidegger, Dreyfus, and the Intelligibility of Practical Comportment.Leslie A. MacAvoy - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (1):68-86.
    ABSTRACTMost scholars agree that meaning and intelligibility are central to Heidegger’s account of Dasein and Being-in-the-world, but there is some confusion about the nature of this intelligibility. In his debate with McDowell, Dreyfus draws on phenomenologists like Heidegger to argue that there are two kinds of intelligibility: a basic, nonconceptual, practical intelligibility found in practical comportment and a conceptual, discursive intelligibility. I explore two possible ways that Dreyfus might ground this twofold account of intelligibility in Heidegger: first in the distinction (...)
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  8.  9
    Patočka and Foucault: Taking Care of the Soul and Taking Care of the Self.Vladislav Suvák - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (1):19-36.
    ABSTRACTThe paper deals with Jan Patočka’s and Michel Foucault’s influential interpretations of the ancient Greek approach to care. At first sight, it might seem that Foucault’s care of the self is opposed to Patočka’s care of the soul. On closer reading, however, it becomes clear that the two interpretations lead to similar conclusions, as exemplified by the way the two authors interpret Plato’s Laches: both of them see it in relation to the issue of how to live one’s life. Further (...)
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  9.  6
    The Relevance of Fink’s Notion of Operative Concepts for Derrida’s Deconstruction.Pietro Terzi - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (1):50-67.
    ABSTRACTIn the literature on Derrida’s philosophical formation, the name of Eugen Fink is usually forgotten. When it is recalled, it is most often because of his 1930s articles on phenomenology. In this paper, I claim on the contrary that Fink’s writings exerted a lasting influence on Derrida’s thought, well beyond his early phenomenological works. More specifically, I focus on a 1957 paper presented at a conference on Husserl’s thought where Fink formulates an important distinction between operative and thematic concepts. By (...)
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  10.  3
    The Freedom of Thought: Patočka on Descartes and Husserl.Anita Williams - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (1):37-49.
    ABSTRACTPatočka highlights the central role of Cartesianism in our tradition of thinking. Yet, today, brain scientists often claim to have overcome Cartesian dualism. In this paper, I argue that the Cartesian conceptions of human nature and sensory perception remain presuppositions of brain science, where perception is largely equated with thinking. Equating perception and thinking means that thinking is a determined process, which leads to an erosion of critique. Critique, and the freedom of thought it entails, is essential to Descartes, Husserl (...)
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  11.  2
    Crisis, Biology, Ecology: A New Starting-Point for Phenomenology?Ian Angus - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (4):267-279.
    ABSTRACTThe crisis of European sciences in Husserl’s late work diagnoses Galilean science as specifically and necessarily losing touch with the intuitive evidence that would legitimate it due to its reliance on a formal-mathematical conceptual apparatus. While the vast majority of Husserl’s late work was focussed on a critique of the formal-mathematical paradigm of the physical science of nature, at several points the possibility of biology as the exemplary science is raised to suggest that the lack of a reliance on formal-mathematical (...)
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  12.  5
    “In the Face, a Right Is There”: Arendt, Levinas and the Phenomenology of the Rights of Man.Nathan Bell - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (4):291-307.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines the differences between the thought of Hannah Arendt and Emmanuel Levinas concerning the “Rights of Man”, in relation to stateless persons. In The Origins of Totalitarianism, Arendt evinces a profound scepticism towards this ideal, which for her was powerless without being tethered to citizenship. But Arendt’s own idea of the “Right to have Rights” is critiqued here as being inadequate to the ethical demand placed upon states by refugees, in failing to articulate just what states might be (...)
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  13.  7
    Natural Reflection, Phenomenological Reflection and Hyperreflexivity.Wenjing Cai - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (4):308-320.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines critically the notion of reflection as self-objectification and points out its insufficiency in accounting for the pathological phenomenon of hyperreflexivity. It proposes an understanding of reflection as situated and motivated from within a world and having a normative aspect that concerns the very life of the reflecting person. On this account, the paper argues, on the one hand, that both phenomenological reflection and hyperreflexivity can be viewed as forms of reflection characterized by loss of the world. On (...)
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  14.  2
    On Pluralism, Value Disagreement and Conflict: A Phenomenological Argument for Axiological Universalism.Roberta De Monticelli - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (4):342-355.
    ABSTRACTThe main question addressed in this paper is whether conflict is constitutive of the nature of value commitment, and hence necessarily implied by value pluralism. If this is the case, no resolution of value disagreements, whether on the global level or within modern multicultural societies, is possible via practical reasons, and the only solutions to inner or outer conflicts will be “political”, in the sense of a Realpolitik. Positive and negative answers to the main question are shown to express two (...)
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  15.  13
    Absent Aspects, Possible Perceptions and Open Intersubjectivity: A Critical Analysis of Dan Zahavi’s Account of Horizontal Intentionality.Gunnar Declerck - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (4):321-341.
    ABSTRACTThe aim of this narrow-focused text is to argue against the claim that the appresentation of unperceived features of objects that is implied in perceptual intentionality presupposes a reference to perceptions other subjects could have of these objects. This claim, as it has been defended by Dan Zahavi, rests upon an erroneous supposition about the modal status of the perceptual possibilities to which the perceived object refers, which shall not be interpreted as effectively realizable but as mere de jure possibilities, (...)
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  16.  9
    Mathematics + Art: A Cultural History.Josef Novák - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (4):356-358.
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  17.  11
    The Ethics of Vulnerability and the Phenomenology of Interdependency.Elodie Boublil - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (3):183-192.
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  18.  15
    On the Vulnerability of a Community: Edith Stein and Gerda Walther.Antonio Calcagno - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (3):255-266.
    Edith Stein and Gerda Walther explain how community comes to be and how it is structured, but they do not develop significant accounts of how communities disintegrate or die, albeit they make passing allusions to how this may happen. I argue that what makes communities vulnerable to their possible demise, following both Stein’s and Walther’s social ontology, is the breakdown of the sense of the communal bond, that is, the failure of the community members’ ability to make sense of their (...)
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  19.  3
    Beyond Bounded Selves and Places: The Relational Making of Vulnerability and Security.Erinn Cunniff Gilson - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (3):229-242.
    ABSTRACTThis essay elaborates how an imbalanced reciprocity between inhabitants of places of relative safety and places of greater precarity results from pursuing security on the basis of a reactive fear of vulnerability. It analyzes a range of features that shape the complex forms that vulnerability takes with a particular focus on how the constitution of places as rhetorically and corporeally secure or not renders different groups of people secure and/or subject to heightened exposure to harm. This analysis suggests that vulnerability (...)
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  20.  4
    Heidegger’s Vulnerability: On the Reversibility Between Nihilism and the Turn of Being.Vedran Grahovac - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (3):243-254.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper I claim that Heidegger exposes himself to phenomenological vulnerability in his encounter with Jünger’s reflections upon nihilism. Jünger insists in the essay “Over the Line” on the necessity of the alternative to nihilism because nihilism reveals itself as an existential global threat. Heidegger challenges Jünger’s suggestion, proposing that one’s alternative to nihilism needs to take into account one’s fundamental complicity in its global domination. Nihilism necessitates the fundamental-ontological investigation into its essence, which is the way of the (...)
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  21.  7
    Vulnerability and Violence: On the Poverty of the Remainder.Leonard Lawlor - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (3):217-228.
    This article tries to show the irreducible connection between vulnerability and violence. This connection leads us back to the ethical level of experience. If vulnerability makes violence irreducible, then at least two reactions to violence are possible. On the one hand, a reaction is possible in which one attempts to negate vulnerability in order to close down the very thing within us that allows violence to enter. This negative reaction is actually the worst violence. On the other hand, a reaction (...)
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  22.  5
    “The Will to Live and the Meaning of Life”: Hunger as Vulnerability in French Existential Phenomenology.Ann V. Murphy - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (3):193-204.
    ABSTRACTThis essay explores the phenomenology of hunger in reference to work by Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Simone de Beauvoir. Considering the wealth of references to hunger in phenomenological literature, very little has been written that acknowledges the importance of hunger in French existential phenomenology in particular. With reference to work by the above authors, this essay examines how hunger alters one’s basic experience of space and time, no less one’s sense of social belonging. Phenomenology illuminates dimensions of the human (...)
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  23.  2
    Feeling Less Than Real: Alterations in Self-Experience After Torture.Gry Ardal Printzlau - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (3):205-216.
    ABSTRACTThe aim of this paper is to bring a phenomenological perspective to bear on a specific problem: how to understand the diminished sense of reality that is often reported by persons who have suffered severe and prolonged interpersonal trauma. For this purpose I turn to resources from two traditions. First, I present a phenomenological account of the intersubjective constitution of objective experience, which is then complemented by a developmental account of how the very small child comes to inhabit a world (...)
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  24.  21
    Heidegger’s Concept of Truth Reconsidered in Light of Tugendhat’s Critique.Gracie Holliday Beck - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (2):91-108.
    Ernst Tugendhat’s critique of Martin Heidegger’s conception of truth is an ongoing topic in Heideggerian scholarship. In this paper, I contribute to the ongoing exchange between defenders of Heidegger and those who are in agreement with Tugendhat. Specifically, I contend that Tugendhat’s criticisms fail to situate Heidegger’s account of truth within his broader phenomenological–hermeneutic project. In the end, Tugendhat’s critique is grounded upon philosophical assumptions that Heidegger is bringing under question by rethinking the concept of truth. I suggest that thinking (...)
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  25.  6
    Transcendental Phenomenology and the Way to Happiness: Husserl’s Reply to Csikszentmihalyi.Kyeong-Seop Choi - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (2):126-138.
    ABSTRACTIt is an unprecedented task to interpret Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology as a fundamental philosophy of happiness. Although happiness has been discussed in many psychologies, Csikszentmihalyi’s positive psychology defines happiness as “flow”, a psychic state of ongoing immersion guided by intrinsic motivations and rewards. In this paper, I interpret our transcendental consciousness as a radical “flow” maker and claim that in our transcendental life, happiness is what we ourselves are. Then, I propose this not only as an appeal to a change (...)
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  26.  18
    The Anticipation of the Present: Phenomenology of Déjà Vu.Stefano Micali - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (2):156-170.
    This paper analyses the déjà-vu experience in order to deepen the understanding of the complex nature of time-consciousness from a phenomenological point of view. The paper is divided into two sections: the first section focuses on Bergson’s research on déjà vu in order to assess the validity of his position; the second section describes a specific form of déjà-vu experience from a phenomenological perspective. This investigation will question the widespread assumption according to which déjà vu should be conceived as a (...)
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  27.  12
    Heidegger on Expression: Formal Indication and Destruction in the Early Freiburg Lectures.Jonathan O’Rourke - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (2):109-125.
    Of all the methodological terms used by Heidegger in the early Freiburg period, few have attracted less consensus than Formal Indication. With its relation to the earliest lecture series, critical debate has tended to focus on the extent to which this concept defines the difference between Husserlian and Heideggerian phenomenology. The argument of this paper is that Formal Indication is best understood in its relation to Heidegger’s other key methodological term from this period, Phenomenological Destruction. Not only do both concepts (...)
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  28.  8
    The Hubris of Transcendental Idealism: Understanding Patočka's Early Concept of the Lifeworld.Martin Ritter - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (2):171-181.
    Jan Patočka’s early phenomenology, as presented in The Natural World as a Philosophical Problem, does not merely adopt Husserl’s concept of the lifeworld. The paper demonstrates the originality of Patočka’s appropriation of this concept, but also its internal tensions and difficulties. Seeking to elaborate a concept of a phenomenology allowing for a theory of the lifeworld stricto sensu, i.e. of the life of the world, Patočka’s book effectively shows that there is no ahistorical, absolute or “natural” starting point for phenomenology. (...)
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  29.  3
    Humanity in Schillebeeckx’s Hermeneutic Phenomenology. Towards a Methodology.Ramona Simuț - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (2):139-155.
    This paper offers an analysis of Edward Schillebeeckx’s insights on different perceptions of revelation as related to concepts like salvation, God, church, human experience and creation in the work Jesus in Our Western Culture. The incentive of Schillebeeckx’s hermeneutical method in nowadays Western phenomenology, upon which God “breathed his breath of life”, triggered our interest in meanings which Schillebeeckx ascribes to human history as the realm of God’s work for the benefit of men and women. This meaning is suggested in (...)
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  30.  41
    The Systematic Import of Merleau-Ponty’s Philosophy of Literature.Dimitris Apostolopoulos - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (1):1-17.
    Scholarly discussions of Merleau-Ponty’s aesthetics tend to focus on his philosophy of painting. By contrast, comparatively little attention has been paid to his philosophy of literature. However, he also draws significant conclusions from his work on literary expression. As I will argue, these reflections inform at least two important positions of his later thought. First, Merleau-Ponty’s account of “indirect” literary language led him to develop a hybrid view of phenomenological expression, on which expression is both creative and descriptive. Second, a (...)
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  31.  16
    Resolving the Paradox of Phenomenology Through Kant's Aesthetics: Between Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze.Joseph Barker - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (1):71-86.
    Commentators have claimed that the philosophies of Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze converge upon a spatial field of sensation which is prior to representation. This essay will contest these readings by showing that, for Deleuze, the pre-representational spatial field of intensity is fundamentally split from thought. This “gap” between sensation and thought is, for Deleuze, fundamentally temporal, in that thought is continually open and passive to being violated and transformed by the sensible and the sensible is continually being pushed beyond itself by (...)
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  32.  16
    Contesting the Will: Phenomenological Reflections on Four Structural Moments in the Concept of Willing.Vincent Blok - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (1):18-35.
    The starting point of this article is the undeniable experience of conscious willing despite its rejection by scientific research. The article starts a phenomenology of willing at the level of the phenomenon of willing itself, without assuming its embeddedness in a faculty of the soul, consciousness and so forth. After the introduction, a brief history of the philosophy of willing is provided, from which the paradoxical conclusion is drawn that, according to phenomenologists like Heidegger and his followers, the dominance of (...)
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  33.  13
    Jean-François Lyotard. [REVIEW]Keith Crome - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (1):87-89.
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  34.  18
    To the Nothingnesses Themselves: Husserl’s Influence on Sartre’s Notion of Nothingness.Simon Gusman - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (1):55-70.
    ABSTRACTIn this article I argue that Sartre’s notions of nothingness and “negatity” are not, as he presents it, primarily reactions to Hegel and Heidegger. Instead, they are a reaction to an ongoing struggle with Husserl’s notion of intentionality and related notions. I do this by comparing the criticism aimed at Husserl in Sartre’s Being and Nothingness to that presented in his earlier work, The Imagination, where he discusses Husserl more elaborately. Furthermore, I compare his criticism to Husserl’s own criticism of (...)
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  35.  10
    Heretical Hindsight: Patočka’s Phenomenology as Questioning Philosophy.Joel Hubick - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (1):36-54.
    I argue that Jan Patočka’s phenomenology can be understood as a kind of questioning philosophy that preserves the work and thought of Edmund Husserl by holding it in hindsight. Following Martin Heidegger’s lead to take up Husserl’s phenomenological questions more than Husserl’s answers, Patočka further develops Heidegger’s strategy with the addition of heresy: the philosophical process of distinguishing traditional questions from their answers in such a way as to preserve both, the original wonder sourced in questioning as well as the (...)
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  36.  8
    Husserl and Racism at the Level of Passive Synthesis.H. A. Nethery - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology:1-11.
    ABSTRACTA number of philosophers within critical race theory use phenomenology to describe the way in which their identities are always already constituted as delinquent within the consciousness of white people, and how their own identity fractures in relation to this white gaze – a fracturing that creates unspeakable ontological, and ultimately physical, violence. Though these philosophers are already doing phenomenology in their work, there is a deeper level of analysis that has yet to be given. Specifically, an account has not (...)
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