82 found

Year:

  1. Dialectics in Turmoil.William S. Allen - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):115-131.
    Consideration of the work of Sade in relation to Adorno usually refers to the much-discussed chapter from Dialektik der Aufklärung. But Adorno made a number of other remarks across his career that suggest a very different reading. I will discuss the three most significant of these remarks and show how they develop an approach to the libidinal aspect of aesthetic experience that challenges our understanding of the relation of thought and language. In doing so, Sade’s works indicate an extraordinary liberation (...)
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  2. The Dog and the Parakeet.Buse Peter - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):133-145.
    This article explores the place of the animal and animals in Lacanian psychoanalysis, arguing that the standard accounts of Lacan on the animal, including the influential intervention by Derrida, depend almost exclusively on the Écrits and Lacan’s early seminars, overlooking late Lacanian texts and seminars. It starts by examining perplexing instances in Lacan’s seminar of “silliness” or “stupidity” – what he himself calls bêtises. The bêtise, which Lacan says plays a critical role in clinical practice, is then treated as the (...)
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  3. Towards an Ethics of Shame.Filipovic Zlatan - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):99-114.
    Departing from Levinas, this paper will address the significance of shame in contemporary discourse in order to approach what could be called its ethical intrigue. Focusing on its political, social and phenomenological implications, I intend to reconsider the experience of shame as it has been appropriated within the politics of affect and account for its relation to ethics, which alone can reveal its transformative possibilities. Shame will emerge as an affect of proximity whose basic structure of being exposed is an (...)
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  4.  2
    Bodies at Liberty in Kathy Acker’s Don Quixote.Finck Shannon - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):81-97.
    Kathy Acker’s work has been praised for the way it highlights the transformative potential of the body in contact with the world. Often, however, such contact also reminds us of the danger involved in the use of the body to disrupt social convention. “Bodies at Liberty” mines this tension, considering Acker alongside three contemporary theorists – Michel Serres, Jean-Luc Nancy, and Mari Ruti – whose disparate theories of embodiment each offer accounts of exposure, vulnerability, and relation as strategies for envisioning (...)
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  5. Making Reason Think More.Patrick T. Giamario - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):161-176.
    This article explores the surprisingly decisive role that Kant’s “incongruity theory” of laughter plays in his aesthetic and broader critical philosophy. First, laughter constitutes a highly specific form of aesthetic judgment in Kant. Laughter involves a discordant relation between the cognitive faculties characteristic of the sublime, but this relation obtains between the understanding and the imagination, the two faculties at play in judgments of taste on the beautiful. Second, laughter is the transcendental condition of possibility for both the beautiful and (...)
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  6. Digital Cinema and Ecstatic Technology.Jurgess Todd - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):3-17.
    This article examines the relationship between technology and aesthetics in contemporary Hollywood, using experiments with frame rates and shutter speeds to show how deep, systemic changes in cinematic technologies can alter our relation to the image’s referential functions. For eighty years, cinema’s registration of movement relied upon a standardized frame rate and shutter speed, meaning that cinema’s sense of motion was constant. With the proliferation of ever more powerful digital capture systems, however, these formerly inflexible options are made variable and (...)
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  7. The Spectacular Anthropocene.Andrew Kalaidjian - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):19-34.
    Geologists propose the term Anthropocene to reflect the dramatic changes that humans have made to the planet. While scientists pursue the reality of our current epoch, technology and media create an increasingly spectacular narrative surrounding environmental events. I look to critiques from Guy Debord and other media theorists as well as Patrick Modiano’s In the Café of Lost Youth to outline modes of détournement and resistance to an increasingly mediated world. Contemporary environmental aesthetics must face the challenge of critiquing technological (...)
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  8. Love’s Lessons.Timothy Laurie & Hannah Stark - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):69-79.
    This article provides a philosophical account of love in relation to contemporary Marxist and post-structuralist conceptions of politics. Shifting the emphasis away from both the ontological question, “what is love?,” and the epistemological question, “how do we acquire certainty about love?,” this article advances a pedagogical question: how might love enable us to learn? To answer this question we turn to the work of Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, and Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. After examining the tensions between ontological (...)
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  9. General Issue 2017.Moncef Salah El - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):1-2.
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  10. Homo Sacer Dwells in Saramago's Land of Exception.Hania A. M. Nashef - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):147-160.
    Giorgio Agamben defines the sacred man or Homo Sacer as one who is not worthy of sacrifice. Having lost all rights, the person is reduced to the non-human. In modern times, banishment or banning by the law occurs when a state of exception is sanctioned by a totalitarian supremacy that suspends judicial power. The state of exception does not lie within or outside the boundaries of the judicial order, but in a zone of indifference. The state of exception in which (...)
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  11. Rethinking Beginnings as Subjective Loss in Narrative and the Theatre.Poiana Peter - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):35-47.
    Beginnings can be empirically described, philosophically debated, fictionally recounted or theatrically staged – each kind of discourse approaches beginnings via an examination of representation as an impossible return to source. The work of French philosopher Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe articulates the problem of beginnings by considering them as a form of subjective collapse, loss of integrity and aggravation of emotion resulting from the paradoxical logic of representation. While Lacoue-Labarthe’s position has been largely developed in his philosophical writings, this study focuses more specifically (...)
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  12.  1
    Michel Foucault, Friedrich Kittler, and the Interminable Half-Life of “so-Called Man”.Thomas Sutherland & Elliot Patsoura - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):49-68.
    This article considers Friedrich Kittler’s deterministic media theory as both an appropriation and mutation of Michel Foucault’s archaeological method. Focusing on these two thinkers’ similar but divergent conceptions of the “death of man,” it will be argued that Kittler’s approach attempts to expunge archaeology of its last traces of Kantian transcendentalism by locating the causal agents of epistemic change within the domain of empirical experience, but in doing so, actually amplifies the anthropological vestiges that Foucault hoped to eradicate. The result (...)
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  13. An Interview with Luce Irigaray on Through Vegetal Being: Two Philosophical Perspectives and Sexuate Difference.Andrea Wheeler - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):177-181.
    In this interview the philosopher Luce Irigaray discusses her book Through Vegetal Being. In response to questions, she distinguishes the human relationship to the environment and to other human beings. She describes how we must change our manner of relating to nature, beginning with our own: to learning how to coexist as a natural being among others instead of dominating the natural world. We must cultivate our instincts, free ourselves from traditions and elaborate a new education and sociocultural order and (...)
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  14.  1
    Postludes.Louis Armand - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):155-163.
    An examination of how the Accelerationist imagination has failed in its deviation from Nick Land's radical metaphorics of an Artaudian and Bataille-esque signifying “economy without reserve” to a neo-Sovietised bureaucratic plan for the post-Anthropocene, per Benjamin Noys et al. Given a positivistic guise, futurology of the latter kind almost always masks a return of apocalyptic humanism. The fantasy of a species unified in solidarity, in full view of its techno-evolutionary obsolescence, seeks to magically transform the history of alienation into some (...)
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  15. Affective Rhetoric and the Cultural Politics of Determinate Negation.Tom Bristow - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):103-132.
    My analysis of political debate in the United Kingdom during the summer of 2016 unpacks the compression of two highly complex issues within an unprecedented moment in British politics: reinvestment in nuclear arms and nuclear energy during the EU referendum crisis. I recover unities and discontinuities across events in this period and throughout history both to examine the non-identity between the particular and the universal as a major trope in parliamentary rhetoric, which construed the universal sentiment of world peace and (...)
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  16. The Medical Implications of Fukushima for Medical Students.Helen Caldicott - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):27-32.
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  17. Bibliographical Resources for Nuclear Criticism.Harriet David - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):165-173.
    This bibliography seeks to offer a comprehensive overview of nuclear criticism, tracing its development from the 1984 issue of diacritics which saw the publication of Derrida's seminal article “No Apocalypse, Not Now ” to the present day. Particular attention is paid to areas of interest which are underrepresented in the available literature, and every attempt has been made to offer a resource which is wide-ranging in outlook while providing a clear sense of the central texts which have shaped and reshaped (...)
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  18. Radioactive Waste and Australia's Aboriginal People.Green Jim - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):33-50.
    The treatment of Australia's Aboriginal people by the nuclear industry is a poorly researched topic. That is not merely a gap in the academic research on related topics, but it has “real world” consequences. Put simply, the paucity of information about the mistreatment of Aboriginal people makes it easier for nuclear interests to repeat past practices; and conversely, proper documentation and publication of past practices detrimental to Aboriginal people can make it more difficult for nuclear interests to repeat those practices. (...)
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  19. Nuclear Consumed Love.Matthew Hall - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):51-62.
    This essay will examine the polemic and poetic means through which three Indigenous Australian writers discuss the repercussions and risks associated with nuclear power, waste and weaponry as an existential and material threat to the mythopoeic creation stories, totemic systems and landforms which sustain Indigenous Australian belief. This essay will follow the establishment of a media ecology through which discourses of technological harm in Oodgeroo Noonuccal's “No More Boomerang” lay the foundation for Australian Indigenous anti-nuclear activist poetics and highlights the (...)
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  20. Two Poems.Kinsella John - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):133-138.
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  21.  1
    Undermining.Kinsella John & Green Charmaine Papertalk - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):63-65.
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  22. That’s Why We Came Here.Sophie Mayer - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):67-76.
    This paper argues for a feminist genealogy of anti-nuclear protest art, around the nucleus of the women’s camp at Greenham Common, 1981–87, a coherent account of whose significance is missing from both feminist film history and left protest history. Drawing on Adrienne Rich’s poetics as a thread connecting the larger anti-nuclear and non-violent/anti-military feminist movement specifically to aesthetic and political formations that informed films made at and about Greenham, the paper constellates a number of experimental works in relation to the (...)
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  23.  2
    Nuclear Theory Degree Zero, with Two Cheers for Derrida.Milne Drew & Kinsella John - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):1-16.
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  24. Nuclear Song.Drew Milne - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):77-85.
    The argument of ‘Nuclear Song’ is pursued at various extremities of the damage done to poetic imagination by what the poem never quite names as ‘the’ nuclear. ‘Nuclear Song’ opens with an epigraph asking how far human agency, even the resources of poetic song, are complicit with anthropogenic radioactivity. Is there a poetic grammar for representing nuclear plumes and umbrellas, the yellow cake and toxic clouds of nuclear trauma that radiate from Japan through the English language? Can poetry even be (...)
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  25. Poetry After Hiroshima?Drew Milne - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):87-102.
    This essay explores the faultlines, poetic pressures and social structures of feeling determining poetry “after” Hiroshima. Nuclear bombs, accidents and waste pose theoretical and poetic challenges. The argument outlines a model of nuclear implicature that reworks Gricean conversational implicature. Nuclear implicature helps to describe ways in which poems “represent” nuclear problems implicitly rather than explicitly. Metonymic, metaphorical, and grammatical modes of implication are juxtaposed with recognition of social attitudes complicit with nuclear problems. Mushroom and lichen metaphors are analysed and distinguished. (...)
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  26. Beyond Our Nuclear Entanglement.Baden Offord - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):17-25.
    This essay explores our nuclear entanglement through culture and the environment. It does so through a quilted self-reflexive narrative. The narrator is positioned as a critical human rights activist, and follows the subjective, imaginative and suicidal implications of the nuclear in their life. A key argument is that we are living within the confines of the nuclear algorithm, which has wrought irreversible changes to the psychological, social, and ethical life of Homo sapiens within the Anthropocene. The essay calls attention to (...)
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  27. Atomic Guildswomen.Olsen Redell - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):149-153.
    Atomic Guildswomen is a hybrid poem-essay that combines art writing and critical reflection on the contexts and sources initially suggested by “A Provisional Memorial to Nuclear Disarmament” by the artist David Mabb. The ironies implicit in the choice of a William Morris fabric design to decorate the interiors of Vanguard Class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines by the Ministry of Defence are explored alongside the history and writings of the women's peace movement in the United Kingdom – especially those of the (...)
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  28. Going Nuclear.Tiplady Jonty - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (3):139-147.
    Dedicated to Seoul, which may or may not exist on publication, this essay notates the transition between the nuclear age and the anthropocene and the ongoing speed race between them. Working with Derrida's 1984 essay “No Apocalypse, Not Now” together with Thomas Pynchon's novel Gravity's Rainbow, Gilles Châtelet's smiling diagrams and Ahmed Farag Ali's 2014 paper “Black Hole Remnant from Gravity's Rainbow,” new speeds of epochal nuclear textuality are noted: the modus of the ext, the geocidal epistemology and obliterating letteration (...)
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  29.  3
    Queer Affordances.Bates Tarsh - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):151-154.
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  30. Monkey Business.Blackston Dylan McCarthy - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):119-133.
    This essay dwells in the interstitial space between human and nonhuman species attributions to consider the dense political and theoretical activity that the domain capacitates. It begins by discussing the bifurcated funding work of the Arcus Foundation – LGBT rights and great ape conservation – as a means of examining how currently prevailing species divisions that putatively work through expansive notions of embodiment in actuality deploy the same logics present in colonial schemes of bodily division. It then relatedly considers an (...)
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  31. Precedence, Trans* and the Decolonial.Daniel Brittany Chávez & Rolando Vázquez - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):39-45.
    These words are a collaborative effort to think across different practices of knowing and sensing. They don’t pretend to compose a complete article. They are simply an assemblage that wants to open spaces for dwelling, for connecting, for dissenting. As such it gravitates around the images of Daniel Brittany Chávez’s performance: “Quisieron Enterrarnos … ”, his artist statement and Rolando’s notes on precedence, trans* and the decolonial. In this conversation, we are allies and accomplices in thinking through trans* as a (...)
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  32. Activism by Other Means.Waltraud Ernst - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):239-244.
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  33.  2
    Staying with the Trouble.Evelien Geerts - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):273-277.
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  34.  3
    Implanting Plasticity Into Sex and Trans/Gender.Julian Gill-Peterson - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):47-60.
    This essay argues that the reigning medical and scientific understanding of the endocrine system, which insists on its fundamental biological plasticity, was historically constructed through a dual child–animal metaphor. The work accomplished by such organic metaphors, as Donna Haraway terms them, returns us to the endocrine laboratories and clinics in which they were built in Europe and the United States in the first half of the twentieth century. The child and animal metaphors implanted the concept of plasticity into the human (...)
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  35.  4
    Impossibility of That.Eva Hayward & Che Gossett - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):15-24.
    Working with Jorge Luis Borges’s The Book of Imaginary Beings, this essay shows how creaturely beings, or transfigurations, dramatize the afterlife of racial slavery, coloniality, the temporality of HIV/AIDS, and how their im/possibility disturbs and breaks with the “order of things.” While transitive and transversal in their potentiality for insurgency, Imaginary Beings and Fantastic Zoology also always carry a colonial logic, a conquest paradigm, while also un-resting the enjoyment of, what Borges calls, “terrible grounds.” Taking up fantastical and imaginary figures, (...)
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  36.  1
    Interchanges.Myra Hird & Harlan Weaver - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):217-232.
    Myra Hird and Harlan Weaver have been invited by the editors of this special issue to enter into discussion with each other – to conduct a series of interchanges – because of the careful attention their research has paid to the ways in which transness as a lived reality is ontologized in humans, non-human animals, bacteria, and viruses. With this issue’s interchanges, we would like to further the conversation on critically approaching the consequences of merging transness with animality. In the (...)
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  37. Menagerie À Tranimals.Lindsay Kelley - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):97-109.
    The prefix “trans-” surrounds “animal” with a pluralizing effect: tranimals. This portmanteau word describes creatures at once real and imagined who traverse taxonomic categories. This essay considers two of many threads of trananimality: the transgenic and the prosthetic. Artist Jodi Clark imagines the Menagerie à Trois as a space for carnal humanimality, where sexual entanglements commingle with chimeric forms. This menagerie à tranimals extends Clark’s ever-expanding Menagerie à Trois by articulating a framework for contemplating and indexing humanimal networks of engineered (...)
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  38. Trans Animisms.Abram J. Lewis - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):203-215.
    This article examines a handful of recent creative works that reflect speculatively on transgender pasts. I argue that each of these creative texts uses ontological interventions to reimagine moments in trans activist history that scholars have narrated only in terms of the attenuation of sociality and of political participation. These works do this by ratifying trans activists’ relations of reciprocity with extraordinary entities that are not often supported by secular and anthropocentric historiographies. Instead of engaging accounts of coalition work with (...)
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  39.  11
    Biohacking Gender.Malatino Hilary - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):179-190.
    This essay explores how, for many minoritized peoples, cyborg ontology is experienced as dehumanizing rather than posthumanizing. Rereading Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto through a decolonial, transfeminist lens, it explores the implications of Haraway’s assertion that cyborg subjectivity is the “illegitimate offspring of militarism and patriarchal capitalism” by examining the modern/colonial development and deployment of microprosthetic hormonal technologies – so often heralded as one of the technologies ushering in a queer, posthuman, post-gender future – as mechanisms of gendered and racialized subjective control (...)
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  40.  37
    Ego Hippo.Florentin Félix Morin - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):87-96.
    This article explores the formation of a tranimal, hippopotamus alter-ego. Confronting transgender with transpecies, the author claims that his hippopotamus “identity” allowed him to escape, all at once, several sets of categorization that govern human bodies. He starts with an account of how his metaphorical hippo-self is collectively produced and performed, distinguishing the subjective, the intersubjective and the social. The article then investigates the politics of equating transgender and transpecies, critically examining the question of the inclusion of “xenogenders” in the (...)
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  41. Blurred.Marta Ostajewska - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):111-118.
    Blurred is a comics-collage on hybridization, coldness and passion. The passage between organic and inorganic materials meets the strangeness of different forms which meld in this abstract tale. The short story/collage/drawings in which the main characters experience interspecies relations is based on the assumptions of the object-ontology. It is a visual flirt with the main topic: “Tranimacies.” The collage refers to contemporary artworks concerning hybridization, objectification, transsexualism, postmodernism and anthropomorphism, which are mixed with texts from newspapers, literature and dreams. Images (...)
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  42.  1
    Dueling Dualisms.Lauren O’Laughlin - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):249-255.
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  43. The Anthropocene, Practices of Storytelling, and Multispecies Justice.Marietta Radomska - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):257-261.
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  44. Subclinical Routine #11, or “the True Story of a Miraculous Transformation”.Trish Salah - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):11-13.
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  45.  1
    Ripple, Angel Quake.Trish Salah - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):85-86.
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  46. Croesus, at Least in Name.Trish Salah - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):155-158.
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  47. Unsettling the Injustice of Im/Mobilities.Silva Belén Rojas - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):267-272.
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  48. Queering Ocean Consumption, Imbricating the More-Than-Human.Reese Simpkins - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):245-248.
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  49.  2
    Catties and T-Selfies.Eliza Steinbock - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):159-178.
    This article responds to the phenomenon of Internet cats becoming pervasive in Web 2.0, while at the same time digitally shared self-portraits, commonly called “selfies,” also circulate with extremely high frequency. The author tracks the efficacy of sharing selfies for trans/Two Spirit individuals such as artist Kiley May and in trans-centric hashtag campaigns. It shows that trans-animality in digital life can offer sovereign forms of subjectivity and engages response patterns that locate a trans point of regard. Further, it seeks to (...)
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  50. Thinking Linking.Eliza Steinbock, Marianna Szczygielska & Anthony Wagner - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):1-10.
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  51. Hyenas and Hormones.Marianna Szczygielska - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):61-84.
    In search for the “missing links” of queer posthumanist discourses, some nonhuman animals play a crucial role in setting up new possible ontologies of sexual diversity. However, the desire to trace “natural” evidence for sexual diversity and a non-binary gender system that goes beyond the simplistic “social constructionism” vs. “biological essentialism” dichotomy in the nonhuman world should be critically examined. In this article I analyze both the scientific and popular representations of “wild and weird” nonhuman animals that became rich semiotic-material (...)
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  52.  5
    Transcending the Human/Non-Human Divide.Madina Tlostanova - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):25-37.
    This article focuses on the analysis of the geo-politics and body-politics of being, and perception as the key concepts in the decolonial option grounded in the spatiality and corporeality of our cognitive and perceptive mechanisms. Revived spatiality refers in this case not only to a physical space that we inhabit but also to our bodies as specific spatial entities – the privileged white male bodies or the damned, non-white, dehumanized and often gendered and sexualized bodies from the underside of modernity. (...)
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  53.  1
    Who is Left Out?Vera Weetzel - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):263-266.
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  54.  1
    Trans*Versal Animacies and the Mattering of Black Trans* Political Life.Abraham Weil - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):191-202.
    This article explores trans*versal connections between transness, blackness, and the animal. Drawn from the conceptual vocabulary of cultural theorist Félix Guattari, this article argues that the central purpose of transversality is to create linkages between previously unexplored singularities in a field, and then to create connections in other conceptual topographies at different levels of discursivity. The article advances an extension of Guattari’s “transversal” into a more capacious concept of the “trans*versal,” to analyze the #blacklivesmatter and #blacktranslivematter movements that draw on (...)
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  55. Multispecies Life in the Ruins.Jenny Jarlsdotter Wikström - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):233-237.
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  56. Feral Biopolitics.Hyaesin Yoon - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):135-150.
    This article explores how technological interventions into animal bodies refigure the borders of political community, in assemblage with sexuality, race, nation, and species. To this end, the article reconceptualizes “feral” as a biopolitical figure that unsettles categorical divisions such as culture/nature, domestic/wild, and belonging/exclusion. Alongside the theoretical development of “feral,” I extend the discussion to two sites: the use of long-tail macaques for bio-defense research in the post-9/11 United States and the transspecies intimacy and feral violence/justice in the South Korean (...)
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  57. Faith, Family, and Memory in the Diaries of Jane Attwater, 1766–1834.Cynthia Aalders - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):153-162.
    The manuscript diary of Jane Attwater, an earnestly religious woman from a village near Salisbury in England, offers valuable insight into how women's so-called “private” writings were crucial in preserving familial and community history and in contributing to the production of religious culture. Written regularly between the ages of twelve and eighty-one, Attwater's diary is the most extensive diary written by a nonconformist woman in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The text itself is an extraordinary record of her own religious (...)
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  58.  5
    Theorizing Closeness.Talia Bettcher & Pelagia Goulimari - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):49-60.
    Pelagia Goulimari interviews Talia Bettcher on core issues and concepts in Women Writing Across Culture, both in relation to Bettcher’s work and in the context of wider debates in feminist, queer and transgender theory. How to theorize “woman,” “trans woman,” “trans woman of colour,” “trans feminism”? How to put together experience, local knowledge, and communication across worlds? How to amplify experiments crossing the boundaries between theory, literature and life-writing? How to pursue an intersectional ethics of intimacy and “interpersonal spatiality”?
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  59.  5
    Ethical Ways of Seeing the Female Nude in Spanish Cinema.María Donapetry - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):271-278.
    This study analyses three scenes of female nudes in three Spanish films made in the first decade of the 2000s: The Naked Years by Dunia Ayaso and Félix Sabroso, Take My Eyes by Icíar Bollaín and Elegy by Isabel Coixet. It elucidates the ethical rules of engagement with the spectators the directors propose, particularly in regard to the commodification of the female body. The theoretical framework draws mainly from the work of the Spanish philosopher Fernando Savater and approaches the subject (...)
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  60.  2
    My Main Job is to Translate / Pain Into Tales They Can Tolerate // in Another Language.Dowson Jane - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):247-259.
    This article examines the contribution that poetry written over the last fifty years might make to the established and burgeoning field of Medical Humanities. It takes poems by women about cancer and depression as a case study of how they can offer insight into the impact of these conditions on the sufferer. Collectively, the poems document and effect shifts in knowledge about, and the associated stigmas concerning, illnesses that carry secrecy and shame, specifically cancer and depression. Additionally, drawing on Virginia (...)
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  61. “Aulinhas de Sedução” [Small Lessons in Seduction].E. Méndez Mariela - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):197-206.
    This article examines Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector’s contributions to the women’s pages of the newspapers Correio da Manhã and Diário da Noite between 1959 and 1961. While Lispector’s fictional output has spawned a steady flow of scholarly and academic studies from a wide array of disciplines and fields of study, her journalistic production, in particular the women’s pages she crafted under a pseudonym, has hardly received any critical attention. The “women’s page” is a fixed section in magazines and newspapers entirely (...)
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  62.  3
    A Symbiological Approach to Sex, Gender, and Desire in the Anthropocene.Regenia Gagnier - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):11-21.
    The first part of this essay describes a symbiological approach to gender and sexuality; the second, a symbiological approach to world literatures and some examples of gender and sexuality in symbiological literatures. Both are intended to provide more intimate accounts of the Anthropocene than the typical big pictures of global warming and climate change. While grand and world-historical, to be sure, the Anthropocene also affects the most intimate aspects of our lives. Both sex and gender should be understood as the (...)
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  63.  3
    Is There Such a Thing as “Woman Writing”?Sylvie Gambaudo - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):23-33.
    The article revisits the idea that writing may be gendered and asks whether we can define what a “woman writing” practice might be. We do this through a comparative study of the work of Julia Kristeva and Judith Butler. Both have expressed reservations about, even objected to, the essentializing of gender and therefore of writing as a woman. They have, however, provided us with useful tools to define what a non-essentialist understanding of “woman” might entail. The article proposes to do (...)
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  64.  1
    Women Writing Across Cultures.Pelagia Goulimari - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):1-10.
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  65. Gendered Expectations.Grodstein Lauren - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):311-314.
    The author of this paper, a female novelist who writes from the male perspective, has found that writing from the point of view of the opposite gender allows for a more complete imagining of the other, rendering the whole enterprise of creating a fictional character more possible. In this paper, she argues that the success of creating a thoroughly constructed fictional human being often resides in that character's otherness. By separating one's own biography and history from one's character's – and (...)
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  66.  2
    Writing Men Imagining Women.Kirsty Gunn - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):315-320.
    The following piece is a summary of a talk given to address the subject of women writing about male protagonists and from a male point of view, arguing that in Gunn’s own work traditional male characters are posited at the centre of texts that are actually female in perspective, so allowing for the reader to have the experience of a sort of inversion of reading. She does this by prioritizing female agency: thus the traditional male becomes someone else, the male (...)
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  67.  1
    From Symptom to the Symbolization of Receptivity.Louise Gyler - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):35-47.
    Psychoanalytic practice and theory do not map together in any seamless ways. Nevertheless, the creative tension between the two is essential in the production of psychoanalytic knowledge. In this paper, I recount Emma’s psychoanalytic journey using a series of five vignettes from her four-year psychotherapy. When I met Emma, she had been unable to walk for six months. The reasons for her affliction were, at this time, mysterious. During her therapy, a transformative process took place reflecting a movement from symptom (...)
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  68. Transnational Theatrical Representation of the Aging.Eriko Hara - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):93-102.
    Velina Hasu Houston’s theatrical representations focus on exploring cultural collision and coalescence in transnational communities. With her biographical and cultural background deeply influenced by her Japanese mother’s way of life and sense of values, Houston has been open-minded in creating a new viewpoint through which to look at Japan, the United States and the world. Calligraphy is quite challenging in that it looks at her mother’s aging from both Japanese and American perspectives. It sheds new light on not only understanding (...)
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  69.  2
    Encounter with the Mirror of the Other.Ikoma Natsumi - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):77-92.
    Angela Carter spent a few years in Japan, from 1969 to 1972, and though the experience apparently impacted on her creative imagination so much as to transform her writing style drastically thereafter, the details of her life in Japan have not previously been revealed. With original information drawn from interviews with Carter’s former Japanese boyfriend, combined with the examination of her unpublished journal entries, this paper attempts to bring to light the scale of the impact that Japanese society, culture, literature, (...)
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  70.  1
    To Be or Not to Be Métis.Mona El Khoury - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):123-135.
    This essay deals with Nina Bouraoui’s mixed-race identity as presented in her autobiographical novels Garçon manqué and Mes mauvaises pensées. The métis question takes the shape of a representation of an ethnicized, dual and fractured identity. My argument explores a contradiction at work in Bouraoui’s texts: while reclaiming the existence of a Franco-Algerian métis identity, Bouraoui represents the métis as the incarnated perpetuation of the historical tensions that divided France and Algeria. The narratives simultaneously construct and deconstruct Bouraoui’s Franco-Algerian métis (...)
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  71. They.Aliki Krikidi - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):297-309.
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  72.  1
    Practice and Cultural Politics of “Women’s Script”.Fei-wen Liu - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):231-246.
    A script traditionally used exclusively among women, nüshu, was first identified in southern rural China in 1982. Its discovery opened a new window onto women’s lifeworlds and drew many scholars to explore its ethnographic and theoretical significance. Local authorities paid no attention to this “women’s script” until the 2000s. Scholarly investigation and governmental involvement over the past three decades have shaped nüshu’s cultural politics – specifically, how it is represented and practiced in contemporary society. Based on fieldwork conducted since 1992, (...)
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  73.  2
    Feminist to Postfeminist.Julia Novak - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):223-230.
    Biographical novels about historical women artists have been experiencing a veritable boom in recent years. Written mostly by women, they can be understood as women authors’ attempts to reach out across time to other “artistic” women whose lives “speak to us” today. It has long been a key insight of historical fiction research that a historical novel reveals more about the time in which it was written than the time in which it is set. As such, it can be assumed (...)
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  74.  2
    Writing as a “Sie”.Georgina Paul - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):289-295.
    The German poet Barbara Köhler's 2007 poem-cycle Niemands Frau [Nobody's Wife] is more than a feminist response to Homer's Odyssey. In shifting the focus from the escapades of the hero Odysseus to the web of women characters that populates Homer's epic poem – Nausicaa, Circe, the Sirens, Helen, Ino Leucothea, the shades of the dead women whom Odysseus meets in Hades, and “Nobody’s wife” Penelope – Köhler also undertakes a grammatical shift: from the masculine singular pronoun “er” to the polyvalent (...)
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  75. Spreading the Word.Cláudia Pazos-Alonso - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):61-75.
    This article considers for the first time the progressive Portuguese periodicals A Voz Feminina and O Progresso from a transnational perspective, with particular reference to contemporary debates about women’s suffrage in England as well as the wider emergence of transnational women’s networks around that time. It discusses the epistolary contact of the Principal Editor, Francisca Wood, with key radical figures such as Lydia Becker in England, Marie Goegg in Switzerland and André Léo in France, through an analysis of relevant editorials, (...)
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  76. Constructing Selfhood Through Re-Voicing the Classical Past.Tessa Roynon - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):137-152.
    This essay examines three works by three women writers whose strategies for rewriting the past include a revisionary engagement with the cultural legacies of Ancient Greece and Rome: The Emperor’s Babe: A Novel, Looking for Livingstone: An Odyssey of Silence, and Voyage of the Sable Venus. It argues that each embodies a mode of resistance that both protests the historic oppression of women of colour and asserts a black female agency, insisting on an empowered present and future. In achieving this, (...)
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  77. On or About December 1930.Morag Shiach - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):279-288.
    This article examines some important historical, literary, and theoretical questions that are posed by the idea of “writing a life” in the early years of the twentieth century. Its focus is primarily on the constitutive relations between gender, literature and culture in the work of Virginia Woolf, and it proposes readings of a range of texts that were written by Woolf “on or about December 1930″ that engage with questions of life-writing. The texts analysed include Woolf's novel The Waves and (...)
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  78. Attitudes to Futurity in New German Feminisms and Contemporary Women’s Fiction.Spiers Emily - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):183-196.
    Drawing on Clare Hemmings’ work on feminist narratives, this article explores attitudes to the future in recent German-language pop-feminist volumes, including, amongst others, Meredith Haaf, Susanne Klingner and Barbara Streidl’s Wir Alpha-Mädchen: Warum Feminismus das Leben schöner macht [We Alpha-Girls: Why Feminism Makes Life More Beautiful] and the feminist memoir Neue deutsche Mädchen [New German Girls] by Jana Hensel and Elisabeth Raether. After analysing the rhetoric of linear progress deployed in these texts and the ways in which their authors consign (...)
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  79. Women’s Voices of Renewal Within Tradition.Kim Treiger-Bar-Am - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):163-181.
    Women’s voices are widely expressed in current movements of rejuvenation of Jewish traditions. These moves raise tensions within the religious world and the civil legal realm. In focus here is a much-debated instance: the nearly thirty-year effort by Jewish women to pray in a group in song and read from the Bible at the holy site of the Western Wall in Jerusalem. The group is called the Women of the Wall. In addition to the women's rights of speech, discussion here (...)
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  80. Tracing Back Trauma.Claire Williams - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):103-122.
    Although there are many, mostly male, contemporary writers in Brazil whose narratives of urban violence and social inequality implicitly reflect the impact and legacy of slavery on contemporary society, it is interesting that this shameful period, and shockingly brutal events which seem to prove wrong the myths of gentle colonization and harmonious racial democracy, should be chosen as subject matter by four women writers. While very different novels, Adriana Lisboa’s Os Fios da Memória [The Threads of Memory], Conceição Evaristo's Ponciá (...)
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  81.  2
    Does Feminism Have a Generation Gap?Winch Alison - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):207-221.
    This article explores a number of instances when generation is invoked and discussed in three feminist blogs: the UK The Vagenda, the US-based Crunk Feminist Collective, and the UK Feminist Times. More specifically, it examines how generation is discussed in terms of a feminist identity, especially in relation to intergenerational conflict. I contextualize a textual analysis of these blogs within a conjunctural and intersectional understanding of generation. That is, I look at how these narratives of intergenerational feminism are produced or (...)
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  82.  1
    Love in the Novels of Toni Morrison.Jean Wyatt - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (1):261-270.
    This essay focuses on the varieties of love in Toni Morrison’s novels. Love in a Morrison novel is always embedded in history, each character’s way of loving inflected by legacies from the ancestral past as well as from his or her personal past. Morrison has said that her novels are didactic. They teach a reader to think anew about love, race and gender. I differentiate in this essay between the early novels, which teach through character and plot and an occasional (...)
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