40 found

Year:

  1.  1
    The Digital Sublime: Algorithmic Binds in a Living Foundry.Gaymon Bennett - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):41-52.
    This article explores the critical limitations of the now decades-long shift toward digital culture in the material and cultural constitution of biotechnology. It does this by telling the story of three contemporary efforts to reimagine the logic of life on the logic of the digital and the struggles attendant to building the infrastructures needed to actualize that re-imagination and make it profitable. In tracing these stories, it lifts out how biotechnologists, once caught in the spell of the digital sublime, are (...)
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  2.  1
    Relational Realism and the Ontogenetic Universe: Subject, Object, and Ontological Process in Quantum Mechanics.Michael Epperson - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):108-119.
    Amid the wide variety of interpretations of quantum mechanics, the notion of a fully coherent ontological interpretation has seen a promising evolution over the last few decades. Despite this progress, however, the old dualistic categorical constraints of subjectivity and objectivity, correlate with the metrically restricted definition of local and global, have remained largely in place – a reflection of the broader, persistent inheritance of these comfortable strictures throughout the evolution of modern science. If one traces this inheritance back to its (...)
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  3. In-Kind Disruptions: Circadian Rhythms and Necessary Jolts in Eco-Cinema.Erin Espelie - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):97-107.
    The glowing light of cinema, which continues to claim supremacy as a collective site for evolving senses of time, has fundamentally changed since its inception, from exclusively projected light to primarily emitted light. Digital, rather than analog projectors, dominate in personal rather than public spheres. The physiological and behavioral effects of those technologies manipulate our biological clocks, creating an entanglement of time-sensing. Similarly, the art of cinema now relies far more upon energy-intensive materials and methods, from equipment to image manufacturing (...)
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  4. Scientific Thought and Absolutes: For an Image of the Sciences, Between Computing and Biology.David Gauthier & Giuseppe Longo - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):120-130.
    We propose a reflection on the construction of scientific knowledge and in so doing an image of this knowledge. This will allow us to develop a comparative analysis of some of the main principles underpinning the constitution of the different sciences. We will highlight the role of critical thought in science, or even “negative results,” which pose limits and hence open new trajectories. In particular, we will address a misleading point of view, based on some informal concepts taken from computer (...)
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  5. Eros and Logos.Stuart Kauffman - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):9-23.
    For the ancient Greeks, the world was both Eros, the god of chaos and creativity, and Logos, the regularity of the heavens as law. From chaos the world came forth. The world was home to ultimate creativity. Two thousand years later Kepler, Galileo, and then mighty Newton created deterministic classical physics in which all that happens in the universe is determined by the laws of motion, initial and boundary conditions. The Theistic God who worked miracles became the Deistic God who (...)
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  6.  5
    Scientific Thought and Absolutes.Giuseppe Longo & Translated by David Gauthier - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):120-130.
    We propose a reflection on the construction of scientific knowledge and in so doing an image of this knowledge. This will allow us to develop a comparative analysis of some of the main principles u...
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  7. Ontogenesis Beyond Complexity.Adam Nocek & Cary Wolfe - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):1-2.
    This article develops a media philosophical framework for addressing the intersection of epigenetics and complex dynamical systems in theoretical biology. In particular, it argues that the theoretical humanities need to think critically about the computability of epigenomic regulation, as well as speculatively about the possibility of an epigenomics beyond complexity. The fact that such a conceptual framework does not exist suggests not only a failure to engage with the mathematics of complexity, but also a failure to engage with its history. (...)
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  8. Ontogenesis Beyond Complexity: The Work of the Ontogenetics Process Group.Adam Nocek & Cary Wolfe - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):3-8.
    This article develops a media philosophical framework for addressing the intersection of epigenetics and complex dynamical systems in theoretical biology. In particular, it argues that the theoretical humanities need to think critically about the computability of epigenomic regulation, as well as speculatively about the possibility of an epigenomics beyond complexity. The fact that such a conceptual framework does not exist suggests not only a failure to engage with the mathematics of complexity, but also a failure to engage with its history. (...)
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  9. Alienated Life: Toward a Goth Theory of Biology.Phillip Thurtle - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):53-63.
    German Idealism still dominates most approaches in theoretical biology. This has led to a conception of organisms as tightly regulated self-forming systems where the demands of the whole organism dominate how the parts are coordinated. This article troubles this approach by presenting aspects of biology that refuse to be synthesized into a specific whole. I call this approach “goth biology” as it recognizes the murkiness of systems of knowledge, the loosely composite nature of most living things, and the continual haunting (...)
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  10. The Singularity has Come and Gone: The Beginning of Organization.Helga C. Wild - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):83-96.
    This paper reflects on a genesis that seems inseparable from that of the human, namely, the coming into being of social organization. It seems impossible to think of a time when humans were not embedded in some social configuration, but it is equally impossible to think of the human species evolving complete with sociocultural formations attached. Even deciding on the word for the beginning of organization prejudges the issue: are we speaking of an emergence, a development, a making, or a (...)
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  11. What “the Animal” Can Teach “the Anthropocene”.Cary Wolfe - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):131-145.
    This essay begins by noting that “the question of the animal” has been abandoned prematurely in the current theoretical landscape in favor of the Plant, the Stone, the Object, and a more general rush toward Materialism and Realism. The latest iteration of this economy of knowledge production may be found in the ubiquitous discourse of “the Anthropocene.” While it is a large and diverse body of thought and writing, I will focus here on Bruno Latour’s influential rendition in Facing Gaia: (...)
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  12.  1
    The Square Root of Negative One is Imaginary.Sha Xin Wei - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (3):64-82.
    I focus on specific practices in twentieth- and twenty-first-century mathematics of articulating, barring, taming, and operating with what mathematicians widely call mathematical monsters. I describe how over centuries the quotidian procedures of the epitome of rational practice – mathematics – have produced beings outside the extant purified categories understood by theorems and proofs, despite, and sometimes as a consequence of, ever greater precision and rigor. However, mathematical monsters stand in a different relation to their makers than socio-economic and moral monsters (...)
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  13.  1
    Vulnerability as a Space for Creative Transformation.Laurie Anderson Sathe - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):58-62.
    Pamela conceived of vulnerability as a capability to enhance our lives in a continual creative process of transformation. She argued for recreating our perception of vulnerability as positive in our lives and in our relationships. I come to this exploration of transformation both as an academic and as Pamela’s sister, exploring my own lived experience of vulnerability and love as a result of her passing, and seeking to understand how her concept of creative transformation can relate to my personal experiences (...)
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  14. Anderson on Vulnerability.Alison Assiter - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):222-230.
    Recently, feminists have begun to draw attention to the vulnerability of human beings. This theoretical perspective lies in contrast to an element of the philosophical tradition that values autonomy and freedom. I would like, in this paper, to engage with some of the work of the feminist philosopher Pamela Anderson on the notion of vulnerability. I think that Anderson’s recognition of vulnerability is important but I’d like to suggest a different way of thinking about this issue from Pamela’s. I think (...)
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  15.  1
    LOVE's LUCK-KNOT: Emotional Vulnerability and Symmetrical Accountability.Carla Bagnoli - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):195-208.
    Pamela Anderson argues for liberating love and vulnerability from the myths of the Western philosophical imaginary that tie them to fragility, subjection, and dependency. Spurred by Judith Butler’s work, Anderson finds herself challenged to rethink her ontological assumptions, away from the Kantian conception of the self as morally and ontologically invulnerable. In support of Anderson’s agenda, I distinguish different contrastive pairs of concepts of vulnerability, and argue for the relevance of ontological vulnerability, showing that in a Kantian framework this is (...)
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  16.  1
    The Openness of Vulnerability and Resilience.Roxana Baiasu - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):254-264.
    A positive reconceptualization of vulnerability involves a number of levels of inquiry; arguably, a fundamental or, at least, central level is the phenomenology of vulnerability with which I am concerned in my paper. By drawing on existential phenomenology and by engaging with Pamela Sue Anderson’s positive account of vulnerability, I develop a phenomenological conception of vulnerability as “openness” and pursue it in new directions which connect it to the metaphysics and epistemology of vulnerability. This approach brings to the fore the (...)
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  17.  1
    Exploring Affectivity: An Unfinished Conversation with Pamela Sue Anderson.Andrea Bieler - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):245-253.
    The paper continues an unfinished conversation with Pamela Sue Anderson on affectivity as a major feature of fundamental vulnerability. While Anderson was concerned mainly with the ethical dimension in the reciprocity of being affected and affecting others, the following deliberations begin with a phenomenological exploration of affectivity followed by a theological exploration. Andrea Bieler begins with the apophatic quality of affectivity that manifests itself in the oscillation of Leib-Sein and Körper-Haben. In this oscillation I do not fully know myself nor (...)
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  18. Vulnerable Selves and Openness to Love.Nicholas Bunnin - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):80-83.
    In this personal tribute to Pamela Sue Anderson, based on many conversations, I try out the idea that she was seeking to locate an underlying metaphysical and ethical unity that makes our human vulnerability, love and reflective self-understanding both possible and intelligible. I trace this unity in Pamela’s philosophical imaginary to resonances or retrievals from three philosophers who featured in her “internal dialogues”: Spinoza, Kant and Levinas. I also allude to the great influence on Pamela and myself of our mutual (...)
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  19.  4
    Reorienting Ourselves in (Bergsonian) Freedom, Friendship and Feminism.Nicholas Bunnin & Pamela Sue Anderson - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):23-35.
    Pamela Sue Anderson urges feminist philosophers to embrace Michèle Le Doeuff’s revaluation of women in philosophy through according “fair value” to intuition as an intellectual faculty, a view of intuition articulated by Henri Bergson. She asks whether women who follow Bergson could be given fair value along with intuition. She turns from Le Doeuff’s writings on intuition to writings by Bergson and by Beauvoir, but periodically returns to Le Doeuff herself. In the end, a picture of freedom, friendship and feminism (...)
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  20. Silencing and Speaker Vulnerability: Undoing an Oppressive Form of (Wilful) Ignorance.Nicholas Bunnin & Pamela Sue Anderson - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):36-45.
    The French feminist philosopher Michèle Le Doeuff has taught us something about “the collectivity,” which she discovers in women’s struggle for access to the philosophical, but also about “the unknown” and “the unthought.” It is the unthought which will matter most to what I intend to say today about a fundamental ignorance on which speaker vulnerability is built. On International Women’s Day, it seems appropriate to speak about – or, at least, to evoke – the silencing which has been imposed (...)
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  21.  2
    Wisdom, Friendship and the Practice of Philosophy.Beverley Clack - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):141-155.
    This paper considers the impact that the practices of friendship might have on shaping philosophical activity in the twenty-first century. To consider what it means to practise philosophy necessitates understanding the effect that the structures of the contemporary university have on philosophical enquiry. Maintaining the historic sense of the university as a place where conversations take place which aim at deepening the understanding of one’s world is increasingly difficult in universities structured by the imperatives of the neoliberal economic policies of (...)
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  22. Anderson’s Ethical Vulnerability: Animating Feminist Responses to Sexual Violence.Emily Cousens - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):165-180.
    Pamela Sue Anderson argues for an ethical vulnerability which “activates an openness to becoming changed” that “can make possible a relational accountability to one another on ethical matters”. In this essay I pursue Anderson’s solicitation that there is a positive politics to be developed from acknowledging and affirming vulnerability. I propose that this politics is one which has a specific relevance for animating the terms of feminist responses to sexual violence, something which has proved difficult for feminist theorists and activists (...)
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  23. A Threshold for Enhancing Human Life: Anderson on Capability and Vulnerability.Kristine A. Culp - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):231-244.
    This essay considers Pamela Sue Anderson’s work in relation to her participation in the Enhancing Life Project from 2015 until her death in 2017. Offering a critical interpretation and reconstruction of Anderson’s final work, this essay also gestures beyond it. It begins by narrating her participation in the Enhancing Life Project. Next, it focuses on her treatment of capability and vulnerability, identifying shifts in her thought and bringing theological symbols and a constructive theological interest to the conversation. Anderson depicted the (...)
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  24.  1
    Pamela Sue Anderson – Witness to the Gospel, Prophet to the Church: What Might the Church Hear From Her Work?Susan Durber - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):63-67.
    Pamela had, throughout her life, an ambivalent relationship with the church. She wanted her work to make a difference to it and she was committed to being a feminist philosopher of religion. There are many recurrent themes in her work that clearly relate to her background in the church, and particularly in the Lutheran church of her upbringing. Her challenge to the patriarchy of what she called “hyper-traditional” Christianity is clear, but also her critique of some forms of forgiveness and (...)
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  25.  1
    Creating a New Imaginary for Love in Religion.Paul S. Fiddes & Pamela Sue Anderson - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):46-53.
    Ideas of love within religion are usually driven by one of two mythologies – either a personal God who commands love or a mystical God of ineffable love – but both are inadequate for motivating love of neighbour. The first tends towards legalism and the second offers no cognitive guidance. The situation is further complicated by there being different understandings of love of neighbour in the various Abrahamic religions, as exemplified in the approaches of two philosophers, Søren Kierkegaard and Emmanuel (...)
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  26.  2
    The Disavowal of the Female “Knower”: Reading Literature in the Light of Pamela Sue Anderson’s Project on Vulnerability.Dorota Filipczak - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):156-164.
    Pamela Sue Anderson’s project about vulnerability and the silencing of the female speaker began with her realization of the female philosopher’s position within academia. Exposing the disavowal of the female “knower,” Anderson lays bare the mechanisms of excluding women from intellectual, artistic and religious discourse. Moving beyond the negative configuration of vulnerability associated with an openness to violence, Anderson refigures it as an openness to affection. The denial of thus refigured vulnerability has led to the literal and discursive oppression of (...)
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  27. Love and Vulnerability: Thinking with Pamela Sue Anderson.Pelagia Goulimari - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):1-2.
    Volume 25, Issue 1-2, February - April 2020, Page 1-2.
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  28. Love and Vulnerability: Thinking with Pamela Sue Anderson.Pelagia Goulimari - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):3-7.
    Volume 25, Issue 1-2, February - April 2020, Page 3-7.
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  29. Mortal Vulnerabilities: Reflecting on Death and Dying with Pamela Sue Anderson.Alison Jasper - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):97-108.
    A consideration of some of the embedded themes with which Pamela Sue Anderson was concerned during her career will bear out the suggestion that her approach to enhancing life was richly engaging and distinctive. However, it is perhaps the idea of vulnerability, most of all, that crystallizes this distinctiveness and addresses the aims of the Enhancing Life Project with which she was associated at the time of her death in March 2017, but also brings her philosophy as well as her (...)
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  30.  1
    Pamela Sue Anderson’s Journeying with Paul Ricoeur.Morny Joy - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):84-96.
    This essay on the life and work of Pamela Sue Anderson traces aspects of her scholarly work that I was very fortunate to share with her over twenty-six years. What brought us together was our commitment to feminism but also our strong interest in the work of Paul Ricoeur – which seemed to many people an odd combination, given Ricoeur’s silence on the topic of women and gender issues. Over the years, we met at conferences, read each other’s books, and (...)
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  31. On the Theme of Liberated Love and Global Feminist Discourse.Ashmita Khasnabish - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):275-283.
    My exploration of the work of Pamela Sue Anderson focuses on what she calls “a philosophical imaginary” in her article “Towards a New Philosophical Imaginary,” in which she responds to Judith Butler’s theory of relational ontology and vulnerability. Anderson’s project is to recast the term vulnerable, which is often associated with feminine weakness, as a positive energy. Critiquing Western myths that portray women as less empowered than men, as in Mary Midgley’s reference to Minerva and Owl that denigrates women as (...)
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  32. Equality and Prophecy.Michèle Le Doeuff - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):68-79.
    As a young philosopher, a third-generation atheist and already a feminist, Michèle Le Doeuff read the Bible on her own, without anybody’s guidance and on the basis of an assumed intellectual equality between the texts and herself. Later on, her friendship with Pamela Sue Anderson also developed thanks to their firm belief that a member of a given faith and an atheist can tolerate and indeed respect each other to the full through a common involvement in feminist philosophy. All this (...)
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  33. Vulnerable and Invulnerable: Two Faces of Dialectical Reasoning.Sabina Lovibond - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):135-140.
    The last writings of Pamela Sue Anderson dwell in some depth on the facts of “mutual vulnerability” and “precarious life,” whether at a practical level or in philosophical argument. This topic can be considered in relation to the founding values of “philosophy” in the tradition we inherit from Plato. Although military imagery is foregrounded in the Platonic conception of “dialectic” – that is, conversation or dialogue in a specialized sense, capable of leading to the stable possession of truth – we (...)
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  34. The Three Faces of Vulnerability: My Vulnerability, the Vulnerability of the Other and the Vulnerability of the Third.Xin Mao - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):209-221.
    Recent work by emerging “vulnerability theorists” has imbued the concept of vulnerability with new meaning that promises novel theoretical and social insights; however, these insights remain threatened by the innate ambiguity of the notion of vulnerability. The negative connotation of this term, namely the propensity to experience wounding, pain and marginalization, coexists with its positive connotation of an openness to love, care and the creation of solidarity. In this paper, we argue that this ambiguity calls for a clarification in order (...)
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  35. Pamela Anderson and “Vulnerability”.Alan Montefiore - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):54-57.
    I first met Pamela way back in the 1980s, when I found myself acting as supervisor of her doctoral thesis on the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur. As I read her later writing and look back on her career, I am most struck by, on the one hand, the marked contrast between the vulnerability and uncertainties, both philosophical and personal, of her earlier time and the assurance of her later writing; and, on the other, the persistence throughout the continuing narrative of (...)
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  36.  4
    The Concern with Truth, Sense, Et Al. – Androcentric or Anthropocentric?A. W. Moore - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):126-134.
    In her book Re-visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion, Pamela Sue Anderson generously discusses some of my ideas. In particular, she considers my views about a certain kind of philosophical nonsense. She argues that I am not interested in engaging seriously with such nonsense; and that my not being interested in engaging seriously with it betrays my gender. This essay is a response to Anderson’s discussion. I argue that she is guilty of certain errors, both exegetical and philosophical. In the (...)
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  37.  3
    Towards a New Philosophical Imaginary.A. W. Moore, Sabina Lovibond & Pamela Sue Anderson - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):8-22.
    The paper builds on the postulate of “myths we live by,” which shape our imaginative life, but which are also open to reflective study and reinvention. It applies this principle, in particular, to the concepts of love and vulnerability. We are accustomed to think of the condition of vulnerability in an objectifying and distancing way, as something that affects the bearers of specific social identities. Against this picture, which can serve as a pretext for paternalist and controlling attitudes to the (...)
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  38.  5
    The Idea of Ethical Vulnerability: Perfectionism, Irony and the Theological Virtues.Stephen Mulhall - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):284-296.
    This paper addresses the question of whether there might be secular analogues of the theological virtues. Beginning with a Kierkegaardian account of the unity and structural underpinnings of Christian accounts of faith, hope and love as distinct from moral virtues more generally, it utilizes ideas from Stanley Cavell, John Stuart Mill and Jonathan Lear to develop a phenomenology of familiar moral experiences whose underlying logic points us in the direction of an essential role that might be served by secular inflections (...)
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  39.  1
    Conditioned Responsibility, Belonging and the Vulnerability of Our Ethical Understanding.Chon Tejedor - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):181-194.
    In this paper I explore the ethical responsibility of agents who find themselves in situations characterized by what I call the Individual Ethical Gap. Individual Ethical Gap situations are structured so as to rule out holding individuals responsible for their actions and omissions by virtue of the intentions behind or the consequences of their actions. I argue that, in IEG situations, individuals can nevertheless, depending on the circumstances, be held ethically responsible for their actions and omissions by virtue of the (...)
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  40. The Risks of Love and the Ambiguities of Hope.Günter Thomas - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):265-274.
    This paper explores the intimate connection between love and hope. Building on insights from Pamela Sue Anderson’s writings on vulnerable love, it focuses on the often-overlooked insight that love is saturated with risks, including the risk of rejection. Even though love intensifies vulnerabilities, it remains creative, albeit in a dangerous way. Hope addresses the problems love poses by temporizing them, but hope is not without risks and ambiguities itself. The distinction between “hope for” and “hope in” someone, a move which (...)
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