52 found

Year:

  1.  5
    Nature's Capacities.Charlotte Alderwick - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):59-76.
    This paper draws a number of parallels between Schelling’s Naturphilosophie and contemporary work in the metaphysics of powers. This concept is being applied to a range of debates, however a distinct lack of work exists focusing on extending this concept to ontology as a whole. I argue that Schelling’s Naturphilosophie provides insight into what this kind of system would look like. I begin with a brief outline of the characterisation and use of powers in the contemporary literature to show the (...)
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  2.  4
    Schelling’s Shadow.Alexander Bilda - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):111-120.
    Merleau-Ponty’s later works, especially his 1956–57 lectures on Nature, offer a unique interpretation of Schelling’s philosophy as a whole. His systematic approach towards Schelling enables him to neglect the division of Schelling’s works into an early and a late period. Although his work on Schelling is not fully accurate with respect to the historic details, Merleau-Ponty succeeds in illuminating problems in Schelling’s philosophy that Schelling himself could not solve. The main thesis of my essay is that the two philosophers follow (...)
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  3.  4
    Vitality or Weakness?Michael O’Neill Burns - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):11-22.
    This article explores the role of nature in two strands of contemporary materialist philosophy: new materialism, and transcendental materialism. Through an analysis of these strands of materialism via the work of Jane Bennett, William E. Connolly, Catherine Malabou, and Adrian Johnston, the article attempts to delineate these perspectives into the opposed camps of monist and dialectical materialisms. The implications of these differing materialist ontologies are then discussed in terms of the theorization of nature as either a vital material force or (...)
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  4.  3
    On the Possibility of Speculative Ethical Absolutes After Kant.Drew M. Dalton - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):157-172.
    According to Quentin Meillassoux, one of the principal aims of speculative philosophy “must be the immanent inscription of values in being.” In this regard, the return to speculation in contemporary philosophy is in many ways a deeply ethical project. This “inscription of values” can only be successful, however, if it can somehow assert an absolute ethical value without, on the one hand, resorting to the kind of dogmatism laid to rest by the Kantian critique; or, on the other, by falling (...)
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  5.  2
    Space Philosophy.Marie-Luise Heuser - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):43-57.
    INSPIRED by a dynamist Naturphilosophie and looking for a mathematics of the natura naturans, the founders of modern mathematics in Germany made some lasting contributions in the attempt to go beyond perceptible space. Hermann Grassmann’s extension theory, Johann Benedict Listing’s topology, Bernhard Riemann’s non-Euclidean manifold theory, Carl Gustav Jacob Jacobi’s approach to non-mechanistic theory and last but not least Georg Cantor’s transfinite set theory were all influenced by the tradition of Naturphilosophie. One central motivation for the new mathematics was to (...)
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  6.  7
    The Parallax of Individuation.Yuk Hui - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):77-89.
    This article explores the concept of individuation in the early Schelling and Simondon by bringing them into dialogue, thereby highlighting affinities and differences in their philosophical projects in light of their epistemological and historical backgrounds. Individuation stands out as a major component of both Schelling’s Naturphilosophie and Simondon’s theory of genesis. But its role within both authors’ thinking is quite different: while for Schelling individuation constitutes a major problem that the philosophy of nature ventures to solve, namely the constitution of (...)
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  7.  5
    Is the Late Schelling Still Doing Nature-Philosophy?Sean J. McGrath - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):121-141.
    I argue against current deflationary trends in Schelling scholarship that positive philosophy is not negative philosophy by other means but exceeds it in content and form. While nature-philosophy gives to positive philosophy the means to think the positive, the latter is not “natural” but revealed. I situate the turn to the positive in Schelling’s 1809 Freedom essay, which introduces the possibility of a real distinction between nature and God for the first time in Schelling’s thought, a possibility which becomes actual (...)
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  8.  5
    Against Kant.Tyler Tritten - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):143-155.
    F.W.J. Schelling’s late distinction between negative and positive philosophy correlates negative philosophy with critical philosophy, which delimits what could be said of things without yet actually being able to do so. Positive philosophy, however, is able to make assertions about the actual existence of such objects without transgressing Kant’s prison of finitude, i.e., without moving from an immanent, subjective and transcendental position to a transcendent object. Schelling’s later positive philosophy rather asserts that one begins outside Kant’s prison. This is not (...)
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  9.  1
    Editorial Introduction.Tyler Tritten & Daniel Whistler - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):1-9.
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  10.  3
    Naturalism and Symbolism.Daniel Whistler - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):91-109.
    I argue that Schelling’s construction of symbolic language is to be understood as an application of Naturphilosophie; indeed, more generally, that the concept of the symbol theorised anew in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Germany was predominantly a naturphilosophische concept, and its transfer into the discourses of aesthetics and ultimately linguistics was one instance of a broader project to understand aesthetic phenomena through the explanatory framework of naturalism. That is, Schelling is here understood as continuing a project of “aesthetic naturalism,” (...)
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  11.  3
    Lamps, Rainbows and Horizons.Ben Woodard - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):23-41.
    In the present essay I address the apparently problematic status of epistemology in F.W.J. Schelling’s work. Given the overblown emphasis on Schelling’s anti-Kantianism, there would seem to be little hope in articulating anything like a theory of knowledge in Schelling’s thought. For the sake of brevity I emphasize knowledge’s spatial and navigational functions in Schelling’s texts. For Schelling, the navigational is that which locates, and constructively constrains, the capacity of the subject to synthesize. This is accomplished, I argue, via a (...)
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  12.  6
    Absolute Knowing.Jennifer Ann Bates - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):65-82.
    Hegel’s “Absolute Knowing” and Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida are tragi-comic consternations. They are theatres of ethical panentheism: they present dramatic “absolute” ethical interpretations and actions, each of which is at once ungrounded and completely seeded. I start with the etymology of “consternation.” Then I discuss the comic vs. tragic interpretations of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, arguing it is a consternating tragi-comedy. I analyze the predicate “absolute” in terms of consternations, in a few passages of the book. I elaborate especially upon (...)
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  13.  2
    Something Mechanical Encrusted on the Living or, “Que Signifie le Rire?”.Richard Doyle - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):83-87.
    Theories of laughter exemplify the radical difference between descriptive language and actuality. This difference is figured by Henri Bergson in his classic treatment of laughter as the mismatch between the mechanical and the living, a differential locus modeled herein with the help of a banana peel.
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  14.  14
    Why so Serious?Russell Ford - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):1-11.
    The Western philosophical tradition shows a marked fondness for tragedy. From Plato and Aristotle, through German idealism, to contemporary reflections on the murderous violence of the twentieth century, philosophy has often looked to tragedy for resources to make suffering, grief, and death thinkable. But what if, in showing this preference, philosophical thought has unwittingly and unknowingly aligned itself with a form of thinking that accepts injustice without protest? What if tragedy, and the philosophical thinking that mobilizes it, gives a tacit (...)
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  15.  4
    Humor, Law, and Jurisprudence.Russell Ford - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):89-102.
    Dramatization and comedy are recurring themes in Deleuze's work in the 1960′s and, from his book on Nietzsche in 1962 through The Logic of Sense in 1969, remarks on humor and comedy are closely bound to ethical and political concerns. In Nietzsche and Philosophy, he speaks of the “true” and “false” senses of the tragic in order to frame his interpretation of Nietzsche as a whole, but the distinction acquires its immediate importance from its bearing on the question, “what is (...)
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  16.  1
    Homage to Penia.Bernard Freydberg - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):27-33.
    The vastly underrated Plutus receives at least some of its due in this paper. At its beginning, I attempt to locate Plutus within both the Hegelian discourse on comedy and within Hume's poetical and philosophical fictions. Employing the same method of close textual analysis that I employed in Philosophy and Comedy: Aristophanes, Logos, and Eros, I focus upon the thoroughgoing materialism of the poor farmer Chremylus who laments the unjust distribution of wealth, and who seeks to restore the god's sight (...)
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  17.  1
    Being Funny.Bill Martin - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):137-150.
    A Zen Maoist koan: Bill is developing a crazy synthesis that brings together Buddhism, Maoism, and French Marxism, especially Badiou. Running through all three are themes concerning emptiness, letting go, and contingency. On the other hand, when Bill's mind runs toward just making up stuff that seems funny to him, it is hard for him to stop. This “essay” is a meeting point between these two activities, and at some point in the underdetermined, contingent future there will have to be (...)
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  18.  1
    Plato and the Spectacle of Laughter.Michael Naas - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):13-26.
    This essay examines the critical role played by comedy and laughter in Plato. It begins by taking seriously Plato's critique of comedy and his concerns about the negative effects of laughter in dialogues such as Republic and Laws. It then shows how Plato, rather than simply rejecting comedy and censuring laughter, attempts to put these into the service of philosophy by rethinking them in philosophical terms. Accordingly, the laughable or the ridiculous is understood not just in relation to the ugly (...)
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  19.  2
    At Least They Had an Ethos.Richard A. Lee Jr - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):55-64.
    I argue that the uniqueness of comedy lies in its potential for social critique. Reading through Aristotle, Hegel, and Umberto Eco, I show that because comedy is not negative, not a counter-argument, it can expose social structures for what they are.
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  20. Quantum Andy.H. Peter Steeves - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):115-136.
    In this essay I attempt to unpack Andy Kaufman in his many manifestations, ultimately arguing that traditional notions of comedy cannot help us get at the root of what is going on here. Through a discussion and criticism of the theories of comedy presented by Christopher Fry, Susanne Langer, Walter Kerr, and Maurice Charney, I suggest how Andy's comedy employs a rejection of the modernist conceits of a fixed identity, a denotative language, a progressive history, and a separation of temporality (...)
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  21.  3
    Prostrating Before Adrasteia.Sonja Tanner - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):35-53.
    Comedy and philosophy have too often been thought immiscible, a tradition supported by a solemn reading of philosophers such as Plato. A closer look at Plato – and specifically at what may be his most familiar dialogue – the Republic, suggests just the contrary. Far from immiscible, comedy and philosophy are entwined in ways that are mutually illuminating. I argue that a joke in Book V reveals the self-forgetting involved in founding the city in speech, and so illustrates the vitality (...)
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  22.  4
    Go Bleep Yourself!Robert T. Valgenti - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):103-114.
    This essay argues that the use of the censor's bleep for comedic effect in cases when an actual expletive is not present can contribute not only to our understanding of traditional theories of humor but also uncover a deep connection between censorship, humor, and human speech. The essay begins with a description of the phenomenon of “unnecessary censorship” within the context of prime-time television and the growing use of profane and indecent language. To understand why unnecessary censorship works as a (...)
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  23.  2
    Darkness in a Blink of an Eye.Suvi Alt - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):17-31.
    Eschatologies often associate this world with darkness and the beyond with light, seeking a move from the former to the latter. This article rethinks the importance of darkness through a reading of Heidegger’s concept of Augenblick, a blink of an eye, which exhibits a moment and site of a “beyond” coming to presence. Thus, the article contributes to approaches that seek to explore the ontological and poetic dimensions of politics. An onto-poetics of darkness draws attention to the presence of the (...)
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  24.  6
    Slow Down.Jason Barker - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):227-235.
    This paper reviews Benjamin Noys’ recent attempt in Malign Velocities: Accelerationism and Capitalism to mount a critique of accelerationism. The book, persuasive in certain respects, bypasses the institutional dynamics of accelerationism’s theoretical progenitors, viz. Nick Land and the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit of Warwick University, and instead portrays it as a “defeatist strategy” of the post-’68 conjuncture of “Deleuzian Thatcherism.” Such portrayal is debatable to the extent that it exhibits a questionable appropriation of “theory” in the strict sense of the (...)
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  25.  7
    A Queer Feeling for Plato.Emanuela Bianchi - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):139-162.
    This paper takes Plato's metaphor of poetic transmission as magnetic charge in the Ion as a central trope for thinking through the various relationships between philosophy and literature; between poetry, interpretation, and truth; and between erotic affects and the material, corporeal, queer dimensions of reception. The affective dimensions of the Platonic text in the Ion, Republic, Symposium, and Phaedrus are examined at length, and the explicit accounts of ascent to philosophical truth are shown to be complicated by the persistence of (...)
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  26.  3
    Velázquez’s Dwarfs and the Modern Uncanny.Keith Broadfoot - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):33-50.
    In this article I focus on a “set” of four paintings by Diego Velázquez that form part of his contribution to the interior decoration of the Torre de la Parada. Developing upon Lacan’s response to Foucault’s famous commentary on Las Meninas I argue that Velázquez’s modernity is nowhere more marked than in this set of paintings in which an unprecedented focus is directed towards the liminal figure of the court dwarf. Reading these works as displaced portraits of the King, I (...)
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  27.  4
    Common Bodies.Julia Cooper - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):3-15.
    The politics of precarity have emerged on the contemporary scene of critical theory with great social force in recent years. This paper looks at the risks and obstacles of positing precariousness and vulnerability as the basis of a universal ethics while also arguing for the socially transformative potential of such a model. More broadly, it considers the crucial question of what stands in the way of human relation and ethical life in an age of neoliberalism and biopolitics, and posits an (...)
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  28.  2
    Welcome to Su.Damian Cox & Michael P. Levine - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):213-226.
    While some may argue that universities are in a state of crisis, others claim that we are living in a post-university era; a time after universities. If there was a battle for the survival of the institution it is over and done with. The buildings still stand. Students enrol and may attend lectures, though most do not. But virtually nothing real remains. What some mistakenly take to be a university is, in actuality, an “uncanny” spectral presence. The encompassing ethico-philosophical question (...)
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  29.  5
    Appropriating Difference in Ella C. Sykes’ Through Persia on a Side-Saddle.Farah Ghaderi & Karim Sadeghi - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):163-176.
    This article teases out Ella Sykes’ responses to the differences she encounters in the contact zone in Persia in her much-neglected travel narrative Through Persia on a Side-Saddle. The authors argue that Ella Sykes’ position/self-positioning in relation to difference is shaped by various, and at times opposing, factors, which contribute to the ambivalent nature of her representations of Persia and its people in her travel narrative. The paper proposes that even though Through Persia seems to be moulded by and moulds (...)
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  30.  2
    Halting the Production of Repression.Cristina Ionica - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):99-118.
    This paper analyses the contagious nature of the paradox as the functioning principle of Deleuze and Guattari’s writing machines, aiming to emphasize the semiotic and socio-political contributions of any linguistic enterprise structurally based in paradoxes. Beckett’s texts are discussed here, as they are in Deleuze and Guattari’s works, as component abstract machines apt to couple themselves to other abstract machines in order to generate increasingly sophisticated and far-reaching liberatory procedures. As the paper shows, paradox-based discourses of the highest degree of (...)
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  31.  2
    Editorial Introduction.Salah el Moncef bin Khalifa - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):1-2.
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  32.  1
    Of Fear and Exaltation.David Rambo - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):83-98.
    This essay considers the political economic ideology in recent popular cinematic depictions of finance in terms of Immanuel Kant’s aesthetics of the sublime. Think, for instance, of the contingent and risky peaks and valleys of the stock market’s price paths as the jagged mountains that inspire the fear and terror necessary for sublime feeling. I give a sustained reading of how the Kantian sublime operates in Neil Burger’s 2011 film Limitless. By subordinating both the technics of neuro-augmentation and the contingency (...)
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  33.  6
    Andy Warhol's Screen Tests.Orna Raviv - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):51-63.
    This paper offers a way to think philosophically about Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests and in particular their ethical implications. I focus on how the faces of the Screen Tests’ participants appear on the screen, making a link to the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas. For Levinas, the human face signifies the possibility of transcending day-to-day structures of perception based on understanding, knowledge and visual representation, and can therefore invite an encounter with radical alterity. I make a connection between Levinas’s reading of (...)
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  34.  2
    The Action to the Word, the Word to the Action.David Rudrum, April Lodge & R. M. Christofides - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):177-191.
    The writings of Stanley Cavell and Jacques Derrida share many points of intersection. One of these is their mutual interest in Shakespeare’s Hamlet; another is their assessments of J.L. Austin’s philosophy, and his concept of performativity. In this paper, we demonstrate that Cavell’s and Derrida’s respective essays on Hamlet offer a surprising insight into their views on Austin’s notion of performativity. Since Hamlet abounds with oaths and promises, testimonies and bearing witness, what is surprising is not that these philosophers should (...)
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  35.  2
    Heavenbeast.Donovan O. Schaefer - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):119-137.
    James Joyce’s Ulysses can be read through the prism of the New Materialist School of contemporary critical thought to shed light on ongoing questions in the humanities about the relationship between language and embodiment. Specifically, Ulysses resonates with three thematic concerns of New Materialisms: the nature of matter, the correspondence between human and animal, and the role of affect. Contra some calls for the humanities to retrench in a conservative posture that reaffirms the special status of human reason and “consciousness” (...)
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  36.  2
    The Unwelcome Crows.Thom van Dooren - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):193-212.
    This article focuses on a small population of house crows in the town of Hoek van Holland in the Netherlands, likely descendants of two birds that arrived by ship in the mid-1990s. In 2014, after twenty years of peaceful co-existence, the government began the process of eradicating this population. Just across the water from Hoek van Holland is the Port of Rotterdam – Europe’s largest port – and an “engine” for the global patterns of production, trade and consumption that are (...)
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  37.  2
    Like One Who is Bringing His Own Hide to Market.Dinesh Joseph Wadiwel - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):65-82.
    This paper explores the commodification of animals, beginning with Marx’s description of how value arises within a system of exchange. Drawing from Irigaray, I observe that value in animals is both arrived at through the use value of the animal as a commodity for human consumption and as a form of currency which serves a function in reproducing the value of the “human” itself. Extending this further, I reflect on Derrida’s discussion of the metaphor as a way to understand the (...)
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  38.  4
    The Philosophical Ethology of Roberto Marchesini.Jeffrey Bussolini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):17-38.
    Central to the work of Roberto Marchesini is a sustained critical engagement with the sciences of animal behavior. Drawing on veterinary, biological, and philosophical training, he critiques the legacy of Cartesianism that sees animals as machines at the same time as acknowledging the importance of biological knowledge and approaches for understanding animals. Further, he offers his own version of a zooanthropological and posthumanist method for the future of ethology as an interdisciplinary social science founded on shared existence, interaction, and understanding. (...)
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  39.  1
    Editorial Introduction.Jeffrey Bussolini, Brett Buchanan & Matthew Chrulew - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):1-3.
    Roberto Marchesini is an Italian philosopher and ethologist whose work is significant for the rethinking of animality and human–animal relations. Throughout such important books as Il dio Pan,Il concetto di soglia, Post-human, Intelligenze plurime, Epifania animale, and Etologia filosofica he offers a scathing critique of reductive, mechanistic models of animal behaviour, as well as a positive contribution to zooanthropological and phenomenological methods for understanding animal life. Centred on the dynamic and performative field of interactions and relations in the world, his (...)
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  40.  3
    Entering Theriomorphic Worlds.Jeffrey Bussolini, Matthew Chrulew & Brett Buchanan - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):255-269.
    This interview ranges across a number of topics relevant to Roberto Marchesini’s thought: the history and philosophy of ethology and entomology; zooanthropology and animal culture; philosophical ethology and philosophical anthropology; animal studies; and animals in laboratories, in the field, on farms, and in household/urban settings. It touches on thinkers including Margherita Hack, Giorgio Celli, Donna Haraway, Giorgio Agamben, Roberto Esposito, Charles Darwin, and Jean-Baptiste Lamarck.
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  41.  1
    The God Pan.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):41-51.
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  42.  1
    Rediscovering the Threshold.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):55-73.
    The concept of the threshold is a central one for thinking about relations between nonhuman and human animals. It refers to hosting and being hosted, the host and the guest, the inside and the outside of the domestic space. It also invokes values of mutual respect and attentiveness. This paper draws on ethological and philosophical sources to argue for the importance of the threshold in understanding human–animal interactions. Violence, sociality, technology and altruism are bound up in the threshold. As such, (...)
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  43.  1
    Animals of the City.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):79-91.
    Although long treated as the human space par excellence, the city is in fact a vibrant ecosystem that is home to many more nonhuman animals than human ones. Nonetheless, the longstanding emphasis on the city as human built environment and human center of culture has occluded extensive study of it as a thriving ecosystem in its own right. Ethology offers valuable tools for conducting a serious study of the zoological dimensions of urban areas. Companion and domestic animals such as dogs (...)
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  44.  1
    Postmodern Chimeras.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):95-109.
    The figure of the chimera animates both mythology and the biotechnological imagination. The mythological construction of animals from the sections or attributes of different species parallels the surgical and genetic manipulations of animals in modern transformations. Chimerization also represents a hybridization that relationally links different species. Both the mythological imagination and biotechnical practice bear heavily on the definition and identity of the human animal. In mythology the chimera links the animal, the human, and the divine. In biotechnology like xenotransplantation and (...)
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  45.  1
    The Theriosphere.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):113-135.
    The theriosphere refers to a site of exchange, interaction, and hybridization where the forms and behaviors of the θήρ, the wild animal or living creature, deeply form the being and becoming of the particular animal human. In a dynamic, vibrant, and multifaceted context of interactions and influences between different animals, humans as a primate with a prolonged period of care for their young are dependent on social engagement and open to the world in an ongoing way that makes them permanently (...)
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  46.  1
    Plural Intelligences.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):143-158.
    Like perception, physical abilities, and digestion, cognition must be treated as a skill that is subject to evolutionary adaptation. There are many forms of animal cognition keyed to different contexts and to different physical skills and needs. From an evolutionary point of view it is not possible to establish a hierarchy or ranking of these types of cognition, which are manifestations of difference. I deem them “plural intelligences” that flow from the ethological characteristics and individual experiences of each animal. A (...)
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  47.  1
    Nonhuman Alterities.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):161-172.
    Nonhuman animals are the most prominent alterity with which humans have engaged in interaction and in comparative self-definition. The reference point of nonhuman alterity is central both to the development of humanism and of posthumanism. In the complex and nonlinear interfaces with nonhumans, humans are extensively hybridized in a process that defines their very humanity. Understanding humans as open and interactive animals rather than as closed and autarchic entities is indispensable to the dismantling of humanism and the development of posthuman (...)
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  48.  2
    Zoomimesis.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):175-197.
    The meticulous observation and imitation of animals lies deeply within human culture and identity. Zoomimesis refers to this performative animal mimicry and to how animal references and interaction are woven into the conception of the human. Zoomimesis has an anthropodecentering effect that places animal–human interactions in horizontal rather than hierarchical relation. Music, dance, and clothing show influence from animal behaviors. Many types of body art and body modification are inspired by animals. Animal movements and behaviors become an extension of the (...)
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  49.  1
    The Therioanthropic Being as Our Neighbour.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):201-214.
    This chapter bears on the concepts of the animal epiphany and therioanthropy. The concrete, real animals in interaction interrupt humanism and human solipsism by showing animal protagonism in the world and by reflecting narcissistic human images back to them with a difference. This looking-glass-self or mirror with difference and continuity is a crucial dimension to the human relationship to nonhuman animals, which cannot be thought without an understanding of this co-belonging. Drawing on Portmann, who is also central to Merleau-Ponty’s account (...)
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    Posthuman Antispeciesism.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):217-233.
    Speciesism is a concept that was derived to name forms of discrimination and oppression against nonhuman animals that could be compared to racism and sexism. The concept was formulated in strong terms by Richard Ryder, Peter Singer, and Tom Regan that made it a powerful tool for social and political movements. The discourse on speciesism has been amplified and changed by a set of newer writings in the last few decades that take a more ethological, critical theory, and deconstructive bent. (...)
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  51.  1
    Philosophical Ethology and Animal Subjectivity.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):237-252.
    Philosophical ethology draws heavily upon the methods and findings of ethological traditions but must be a properly philosophical undertaking that reframes them in terms of critical and speculative questions about animal mind and animal subjectivity. Both traditional ethology and later cognitive ethology failed to call into question the dualistic Cartesian ontological paradigm that introduced and justified an unbridgeable divide between human and nonhuman animals. Following the implications of Darwinian evolution and immanentist ontological philosophy, philosophical ethology presents a model of animal (...)
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    Zootropia, Kinship, and Alterity in the Work of Roberto Marchesini.Boria Sax - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):7-13.
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