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  1.  4
    Joan Steigerwald, Experimenting at the Boundaries of Life: Organic Vitality in Germany Around 1800 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019), 460 pp., $55.00 Cloth, ISBN: 978-0-8229-4553-3. [REVIEW]Rory Bradley - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):195-197.
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  2.  2
    Lysenko in Yugoslavia, 1945–1950s: How to De-Stalinize Stalinist Science.Vedran Duančić - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):159-194.
    By the summer of 1948, socialist Yugoslavia seemed determined to follow in the footsteps of its closest ally, the Soviet Union, and strike a decisive blow to “reactionary genetics.” But barely a month before the infamous VASKhNIL session, the Soviet–Yugoslav split began to unravel, influencing the reception of Lysenko’s doctrine in Yugoslavia. Instead of simply dismissing it as yet another example of Stalinist deviationism, Yugoslav mičurinci carefully weighed its political and ideological implications, trying to negotiate the Stalinist origins of Michurinist (...)
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  3.  2
    Vanessa Heggie, Higher and Colder: A History of Extreme Physiology and Exploration (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2019), 253 pp., 9 b&w illus., $40.00 Cloth, ISBN: 9780226650883. [REVIEW]Tess Lanzarotta - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):199-201.
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  4.  8
    William Benjamin Carpenter and the Emerging Science of Heredity.John Lidwell-Durnin - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):81-103.
    In the nineteenth century, farmers, doctors, and the wider public shared a family of questions and anxieties concerning heredity. Questions over whether injuries, mutilations, and bad habits could be transmitted to offspring had existed for centuries, but found renewed urgency in the popular and practical scientific press from the 1820s onwards. Sometimes referred to as “Lamarckism” or “the inheritance of acquired characteristics,” the potential for transmitting both desirable and disastrous traits to offspring was one of the most pressing scientific questions (...)
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  5.  10
    An Origin of Citations: Darwin’s Collaborators and Their Contributions to the Origin of Species.Pedro de Lima Navarro & Cristina de Amorim Machado - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):45-79.
    In the first edition of the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin apologized for not correctly referencing all the works cited in his magnum opus. More than 150 years later we have catalogued these citations and analyzed the resultant data. Looking for a complete selection of collaborators, a flexible interpretation of the term citation was necessary; we define it as any reference made to a third party, independently of its form or function. Following the same idea, the sixth edition of the (...)
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  6.  12
    2020 Everett Mendelsohn Prize.Karen Rader & Marsha Richmond - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):1-3.
    It is our great pleasure to announce that the recipient of the 2020 Everett Mendelsohn Prize is Daniel Liu, whose essay, “The Cell and Protoplasm as Container, Object, and Substance, 1835–1861,” appeared in the Journal of the History of Biology, Volume 50, 4 (2017), pp. 889–925.
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  7.  1
    Production Hydrobiology in the USSR Under the Pressure of Lysenkoism: Vladimir I. Zhadin’s Forgotten Theory of Biological Productivity.Alexandra Rizhinashvili - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):105-139.
    The present study analyzes specific traits of Lysenkoism dogmas as they were reflected in Soviet hydrobiology. As a case study, I use the now-forgotten productivity theory of bodies of water developed in 1940 by the Soviet hydrobiologist Vladimir I. Zhadin. Zhadin’s views on production relied on his observations of changes in the communities of riverine faunas caused by the construction of water reservoirs. The theory is of particular interest because it attempts to address the unresolved problems of that period. Some (...)
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  8.  3
    Production Hydrobiology in the USSR Under the Pressure of Lysenkoism: Vladimir I. Zhadin’s Forgotten Theory of Biological Productivity.Alexandra Rizhinashvili - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):105-139.
    The present study analyzes specific traits of Lysenkoism dogmas as they were reflected in Soviet hydrobiology. As a case study, I use the now-forgotten productivity theory of bodies of water developed in 1940 by the Soviet hydrobiologist Vladimir I. Zhadin. Zhadin’s views on production relied on his observations of changes in the communities of riverine faunas caused by the construction of water reservoirs. The theory is of particular interest because it attempts to address the unresolved problems of that period. Some (...)
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  9.  3
    The New Biology as an Example of Newspeak: The Case of Polish Zoology, 1948–1956.Agata Strządała - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):141-157.
    The “New Biology” that arose in the Eastern Block during Stalinist times was based on the idea of the heritability of acquired characteristics. In rejecting the paradigm of Mendelian chromosome genetics as well as science-based farming, the New Biology led to a deterioration of scientific life and the free exchange of ideas. In imposing Lysenko’s ideas onto zoology, the New Biology adopted the totalitarian language of Newspeak, which dominated public discourse in communist countries. Newspeak had several defining elements: a limited (...)
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  10.  2
    Bill Jenkins, Evolution Before Darwin. Theories of the Transmutation of Species in Edinburgh, 1804–1834.Koen B. Tanghe - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):203-207.
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  11.  1
    Bill Jenkins, Evolution Before Darwin. Theories of the Transmutation of Species in Edinburgh, 1804–1834: (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2019), Edinburgh, Hardback, 2019, 222 Pp., £75 Cloth, ISBN: 9781474445788. [REVIEW]Koen B. Tanghe - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):203-207.
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  12.  1
    Trees, Coral, and Seaweed: An Interpretation of Sketches Found in Darwin’s Papers.Kees van Putten - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):5-44.
    The sole diagram in On the Origin of Species is generally considered to be merely an illustration of Darwin’s ideas, but such an interpretation ignores the fact that Darwin himself expressly stated that the diagram helped him to discover and express his ideas. This article demonstrates that developing the so-called “tree diagram” substantially aided Darwin’s heuristics. This demonstration is based on an interpretation of the diagram and of 17 sketches found in Darwin’s scientific papers. The key to this interpretation is (...)
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