Year:

  1.  4
    Kant and Theodicy: A Search for an Answer to the Problem of Evil by George Huxford.Matthew C. Altman - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):333-334.
    A theodicy attempts to reconcile the existence of evil with the belief in an omnipotent, omniscient, and omnibenevolent God. Hume, among others, thought that they were incompatible, and he used it as an argument against God's existence. Leibniz claimed that this was the best of all possible worlds because metaphysical evil is unavoidable and moral and physical evil lead to greater goods. Kant, however, has mostly been left out of the conversation. George Huxford seeks to correct this.The problem of evil (...)
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  2.  13
    Kant's Revolutionary Theory of Modality by Uygar Abaci.Ralf M. Bader - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):334-335.
    Uygar Abaci's Kant's Revolutionary Theory of Modality starts with a helpful and illuminating historical contextualization of Kant's theory of modality. It sets out the ontotheological debates that form the backdrop of Kant's pre-Critical modal theorizing. Abaci covers the proofs of the existence of God by Anselm and Descartes, as well as Leibniz and Wolff. The first two start from the idea of God as the ens perfectissimum and then try to establish the existence of God by arguing that existence is (...)
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  3.  13
    Editorial Announcements.Deborah Boyle - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):6-6.
    Each year the JHP awards an Article Prize to an article published in the previous year's volume, and a Book Prize to a book published in the previous year that deserves special recognition for its contribution to the history of Western philosophy. For the Book Prize, publishers may nominate books by submitting a hard copy to the Book Review Editor for consideration. The nomination and book must be received by January 1 following the year for which the prize is to (...)
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  4.  5
    Heidegger Becoming Phenomenological: Interpreting Husserl Through Dilthey, 1916–1925 by Robert C. Scharff.Steven Crowell - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):341-342.
    Robert Scharff's new book wants to set the record straight. For too long, scholars have focused on the topic of Heidegger's thinking, being, and have read Being and Time as a hermeneutic revision of Husserl's transcendental phenomenology, which, like the latter, "takes positions" on philosophical questions, advances "theses," and, for all its emphasis on subjective experience, invites "objective" assessment. Scharff's alternative picture, focused almost exclusively on Heidegger's lecture courses between 1919 and 1925, looks something like this:If one carefully examines Heidegger's (...)
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  5.  6
    Calling Philosophers Names: On the Origin of a Discipline by Christopher Moore.Patricia Curd - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):327-328.
    What does a philosophos do and what is a philosophos anyway? Christopher Moore explores these questions in his intriguing book, examining the history of the word philosophos and considering the development of the discipline that came to be known as philosophia. Moore's account "begins around 500 BCE with the coinage not of a self-lauding 'love of wisdom' but with a wry verbal slight, and concludes a century and a half later, in the maturity of an institution that is continuous with (...)
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  6.  5
    Augustine's Political Thought Ed. By Richard J. Dougherty.Evan Dutmer - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):330-332.
    "Augustine's City of God is not a treatise of political or social philosophy." So begins Christian Tornau's section on political philosophy in his entry on Augustine for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Evident in this remark is the ambivalence with which historians of philosophy have generally treated the political philosophy of the great late antique philosopher of northern Africa. Despite its suggestive title and its extended apologetical attacks on the Earthly City, the City of God is decidedly not a work (...)
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  7.  7
    Briefwechsel zwischen Christian Wolff und Ernst Christoph von Manteuffel: 1738–1748. Historisch-kritische Edition ed. by Jürgen Stolzenberg et al. [REVIEW]Corey W. Dyck - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):332-333.
    These three robust volumes make available in its entirety a collection of correspondence, held at the University of Leipzig library and comprising nearly five hundred letters, between Christian Wolff and Ernst Christoph, Graf von Manteuffel. At the time of the correspondence, Wolff was the most famous philosopher of the German Enlightenment, having taken a position in Marburg after his exile from Prussia in 1723. Manteuffel was a Saxon diplomat, advocate for the Wolffian philosophy at the Prussian court, and a cofounder (...)
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  8.  4
    Aristotle on Friendship and the Lovable.Bradford Jean-Hyuk Kim - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):221-245.
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  9.  14
    What Numbers Could Not Be.Emily Katz - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):193-219.
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  10.  5
    Feelings of Believing: Psychology, History, Phenomenology by Ryan Hickerson.Hayden Kee - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):340-341.
    There has been a slowly developing appreciation from various quarters in recent decades that the overlap between the philosophy of the emotions and epistemology might be greater than one would initially assume. Ryan Hickerson's Feelings of Believing: Psychology, History, and Phenomenology makes a timely and highly original contribution to this discussion. But its scope and appeal reach far beyond that somewhat niche issue, extending to psychology, history of philosophy, phenomenology, and beyond.The book's central theses are that doxastic sentimentalism "plays a (...)
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  11.  4
    Fichte's Theory of Drives.Michelle Kosch - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):247-269.
  12.  5
    Aristotle and Law: The Politics of Nomos by George Duke.Melissa Lane - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):329-330.
    In this excellent book, drawing on previously published articles, George Duke gathers the scattered threads of Aristotle's discussions of law while defending clear stances in the various philosophical debates they have engendered. The book works within Aristotelian methodology and metaphysics, developing the view that a politeia should be understood as a formal cause that is worked out in terms of the successive definitions offered in book III of Politics. Building on studies of the evolution of the meaning of nomos and (...)
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  13.  5
    Quine, New Foundations, and the Philosophy of Set Theory by Sean Morris. [REVIEW]Gregory Lavers - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):342-343.
    This book has two main goals: first, to show that Quine's New Foundations set theory is better motivated than often assumed; and second, to defend Quine's philosophy of set theory. It is divided into three parts. The first concerns the history of set theory and argues against readings that see the iterative conception of set being the dominant notion of set from the very beginning. The second part concerns Quine's philosophy of set theory. Part 3 is a contemporary assessment of (...)
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  14.  3
    Schopenhauers "hermeneutischer" Metaphysik- und Kritizismus-Begriff vor dem Hintergrund seiner Kant-Rezeption.Alexander S. Sattar - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):299-325.
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  15.  6
    Nietzsche's Metaphilosophy: The Nature, Method, and Aims of Philosophy Ed. By Paul S. Loeb and Matthew Meyer.Melanie Shepherd - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):337-338.
    This volume brings together well-established Nietzsche scholars working within diverse philosophical and stylistic frameworks to address the question of how Nietzsche understands philosophy. Specifically, Loeb and Meyer aim to investigate Nietzsche's answers to the following three questions: "What should philosophy be? How should philosophy be done? Why, or to what end, should philosophy be practiced?". The question of what philosophy means for Nietzsche is arguably central to a great deal of existing secondary literature, from French interpreters of the 1960s and (...)
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  16.  6
    Platonism and Naturalism: The Possibility of Philosophy by Lloyd P. Gerson.Allan Silverman - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):328-329.
    Lloyd Gerson has a vision of what Platonism is. Those who see things differently may find his vision bewildering. In Platonism and Naturalism, to his credit, his vision is synoptic and impressively focused on critical passages and issues, especially in Plato's metaphysics and epistemology, though ethics also receives much attention. Leaving aside the introduction and chapter 1, chapters 2–6 are devoted to Plato and comprise two-thirds of the work. Chapters 7, "Aristotle the Platonist," 8, "Plotinus the Platonist," and 9, "Proclus (...)
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  17.  3
    Coleridge's Contemplative Philosophy by Peter Cheyne.Dale E. Snow - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):336-337.
    Peter Cheyne may have understood Coleridge better than the latter understood himself. This book provides an extensive road map to many of the highways and byways Coleridge wandered down in both prose and poetry, and it does so without ever losing sight of the ultimate goal of the journey: a philosophy of contemplative ideas, an ideal-realism that brought together these many disparate influences. For Cheyne, Coleridge is a thinker of the first rank, whose achievement—the philosophy of contemplation, which presents a (...)
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  18.  5
    Space: A History Ed. By Andrew Janiak.Marius Stan - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):343-344.
    This is a book with a purpose: it aims to chronicle the life of a concept from its birth in ancient Greece to its growth into centrality for early modern metaphysics, and its end with Kant, after whom classical space got displaced to a marginal position. The volume is commendable for its good balance of broad scope, depth of insight, and careful exposition. Its chapters impressively combine analytic sharpness with sensitivity to historical context and philological nuance. Moreover, the gender balance (...)
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  19.  5
    Political Corruption: The Underside of Civic Morality by Robert Alan Sparling.Tim Stuart-Buttle - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):338-339.
    As Nietzsche famously declared, only that which has no history can be defined. Robert Sparling's superb book shows that corruption is a concept with a history. Although Political Corruption is ordered chronologically, it is expressly not a linear account of how one modern definition of corruption evolved. History instead discloses how the concept has been deployed in a variety of modes in occidental political philosophy, seven of which are recovered here: from Erasmus's focus on the moral integrity of the prince (...)
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  20.  4
    What Is a Person? Realities, Constructs, Illusions by John M. Rist.Eileen C. Sweeney - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):345-346.
    John Rist's What Is a Person? is a scholarly, rich, and trenchant study of the history of the concept of personhood in Western thought. However, its sharp critique of modern and postmodern accounts of personhood, though thought-provoking, also uses jarringly polemical language, which further undermines the book's flawed overall argument. The first section, "Constructing the Mainline Tradition," carefully mines ancient and medieval sources, tracing with nuance and complexity the different threads in the notion of person. The threads are religious, philosophical, (...)
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  21.  6
    Problems with the Life of Pleasure: The Γένεσις Argument in Plato's Philebus.Derek Van Zoonen - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):167-191.
    At Philebus 53c4–55a12, Plato’s Socrates identifies pleasure as an ontologically inferior “becoming” (γένεσις) rather than a “being” (οὐσία) and then uses this information to infer that pleasure, somehow, lacks value. This paper argues that Plato’s γένεσις argument is not about the goodness of individual, particular episodes of pleasure but instead targets the identification of pleasure as the good around which we ought to organize our lives. It also shows that the argument is made up of two subarguments—the argument from finality (...)
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  22.  7
    Metaphysics Supervenes on Logic: The Role of the Logical Forms in Hegel's "Replacement" of Metaphysics.W. Clark Wolf - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):271-298.
  23.  9
    Phenomenological Themes in Aron’s Philosophy of History.Dimitris Apostolopoulos - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):113-143.
    Aron’s writings are lauded for their contributions to liberal political theory, international relations, and sociology. I argue that his early thought also offers phenomenological considerations for a relativist view of historical meaning, whose important role in the text’s argument has been suppressed by received interpretations. Drawing a direct link between introspective, intersubjective, and historical understanding, Aron argues that the “objectification” of intentions necessarily transforms their meaning. This impedes an objective account of historical subjects’ lived experience. Some of the Introduction’s appraisals (...)
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  24.  5
    Unpublished Fragments From the Period of Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Summer 1882–Winter 1883/84) by Friedrich Nietzsche.Paul Bishop - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):159-160.
    Begun by Ernst Behler and Bernd Magnus, and now under the editorial direction of Alan D. Schrift and Duncan Large, Stanford University Press’s ambitious project to offer in nineteen volumes a complete translation of the fifteen-volume Kritische Studienausgabe of Nietzsche’s works is proceeding apace. Volume 14 corresponds to volume 10 of the KSA and, while its first fragment demonstrates the need for its helpful editorial apparatus to make sense of these texts, its second raises more general questions about translation. These (...)
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  25.  5
    The Singular Voice of Being: John Duns Scotus and Ultimate Difference by Andrew LaZella.Mary Beth Ingham Csj - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):147-148.
    While much has been published on the philosophical and theological positions of John Duns Scotus, the univocal concept of being continues to be a source of debate and, for some, condemnation. In this ambitious study, LaZella investigates how central the labor of division can be in order to “cut the univocal concept of being at its joints”. Throughout, LaZella engages with classic and contemporary scholarship to achieve a twofold end. First, he clearly shows how, for Scotus, the univocal concept of (...)
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  26.  5
    Light of the Lord (Or Hashem) by Hasdai Crescas.Daniel Frank - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):146-147.
    With Maimonides’s Guide of the Perplexed and Gersonides’s Wars of the Lord, Hasdai Crescas’s Light of the Lord deserves a place on any shortlist of medieval Jewish philosophical classics. Apart from partial translations by Warren Harvey and Harry Wolfson, the English-speaking student of medieval Jewish philosophy has had limited access to the text. Thanks to Roslyn Weiss’s felicitous new translation, this is no longer the case.Light of the Lord [=Light] has of course its own internal philosophical dynamic, but it is (...)
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  27.  10
    Self-Love, Egoism, and the Selfish Hypothesis: Key Debates in Eighteenth-Century British Moral Philosophy by Christian Maurer.Aaron Garrett - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):150-151.
    Self-love was a pivotal topic of debate for moral philosophers in the first half of the eighteenth century. But, as was also the case for related concepts like sociability and virtue, philosophers meant many different things by ‘self-love.’ The historians of philosophy who discuss self-love often do as well. A great virtue of Christian Maurer’s Self-Love, Egoism, and the Selfish Hypothesis is to disambiguate five senses of self-love in eighteenth-century discussions. ‘Self-love’ and its synonyms variously refer to egoistic desire, love (...)
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  28.  17
    Shaftesbury’s Claim That Beauty and Good Are One and the Same.Michael B. Gill - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):69-92.
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  29.  9
    From Moral Theology to Moral Philosophy: Cicero and Visions of Humanity From Locke to Hume by Tim Stuart-Buttle.James A. Harris - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):151-152.
    It would be difficult to exaggerate the importance of Cicero to British—and not only British—philosophers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. For the most part, interest appears to have been much greater in De Officiis, De Finibus Malorum et Bonorum, De Natura Deorum, Academica, De Legibus, and so on, than in the works of Plato or of Aristotle. Yet Cicero was different things to different people. To many, he was the paradigmatic moderate Stoic, critical of the paradoxical excesses of Zeno (...)
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  30.  6
    For the Love of Metaphysics: Nihilism and the Conflict of Reason From Kant to Rosenzweig by Karin Nisenbaum.Gunnar Hindrichs - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):155-156.
    Nisenbaum offers an account of philosophical evolution in the wake of Kant’s critical revolution. She intends “to show that the development of post-Kantian German Idealism is propelled by the different interpretations, appropriations, and radicalizations of the Kantian view that the representation of the unconditioned by finite beings is a topic of practical, not theoretical, philosophy”. While this claim is not new, the different constellations within which it is established are new and original, as is the guiding thread of the book’s (...)
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  31.  17
    Kant on Freedom and Spontaneity Ed. By Kate A. Moran.Desmond Hogan - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):152-153.
    This fine collection of essays is dedicated to Paul Guyer. It includes work by distinguished experts and younger scholars across a range of topics in Kant’s theoretical, moral, and political philosophy.Karl Ameriks’s “On the Many Senses of ‘Self-Determination’” responds to two misreadings of Kantian autonomy. One dismisses its notion of self-determination, the source of the auto-in autonomy, as an excessively subjective basis for morality; the other interprets its nomos as involving excessive determination of will by reason or sensibility. Ameriks responds (...)
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  32.  5
    The Singular Voice of Being: John Duns Scotus and Ultimate Difference by Andrew LaZella.Mary Beth Ingham - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):147-148.
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  33.  12
    Aristotle on the Unity of Touch.Mark A. Johnstone - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):23-43.
    Aristotle is history’s most famous and influential proponent of the view that there are exactly five senses. But was he entitled to hold this view, given his other commitments? In particular, was he entitled to treat touch as a single sense, given the diversity of its correlated objects? In this paper I argue that Aristotle wished to individuate touch on the basis of its correlated objects, just as he had the other four senses. I also argue, contrary to what is (...)
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  34.  6
    Being Inclined: Félix Ravaisson’s Philosophy of Habit by Mark Sinclair.Leonard Lawlor - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):157-158.
    Being Inclined is erudite, clearly written, and well-argued. It is rich in the history of philosophy and in philosophical ideas. It is not an exaggeration when Sinclair says that “philosophy advances, and can only advance, by means of a living dialogue with the past”. This short review cannot do the book justice.Being Inclined is divided into six chapters. From a historical viewpoint, chapters 1 and 2 are revelatory for the Anglophone reader of the last two hundred years of French philosophy. (...)
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  35.  3
    Living Mirrors: Infinity, Unity, and Life in Leibniz’s Philosophy by Ohad Nachtomy.Christian Leduc - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):149-150.
    The concept of life and the importance of the life sciences in Leibniz have recently become objects of much interest. The question concerning the status of life in Leibnizian metaphysics is one of the motivating factors. On many occasions, Leibniz affirms that matter is full of life and that compound substances are actually living beings with a soul and an organic body. Nachtomy’s book touches on these themes, but its originality lies in its contribution to understanding the relationship between life (...)
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  36.  3
    Moral Psychology with Nietzsche by Brian Leiter.Paul S. Loeb - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):160-161.
    Brian Leiter’s second book on Nietzsche brings together ideas and arguments that have already had a significant influence on the field through their earlier formulations in his articles from the past two decades. It is thus indispensable reading for anyone interested in Leiter’s evolving project of showing that Nietzsche has the correct naturalistic approach to issues in moral philosophy and moral psychology. As usual with Leiter’s scholarship, this monograph is extremely clear, densely argued, and philosophically sophisticated.Leiter nicely frames this book (...)
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  37.  3
    Meaning and Embodiment: Human Corporeity in Hegel’s Anthropology by Nicholas Mowad.Elisa Magrì - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):156-157.
    Readers of Hegel’s philosophy will welcome Nicholas Mowad’s interpretation of Hegel’s anthropology not just as a fundamental addition to Hegel scholarship, but also, and more fundamentally, as a necessary invitation to read Hegel in a new key. This entails paying attention to questions of embodiment, race, and gender that are intrinsic to Hegel’s philosophical anthropology. The book’s chief merit lies in the way Mowad convincingly shows that issues of race and gender cannot be avoided while reading Hegel, and that Hegel’s (...)
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  38.  4
    The Pythagorean Precepts (How to Live a Pythagorean Life) by Aristoxenus of Tarentum.Christopher Moore - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):145-146.
    Like his fellow first-generation Peripatetic Theophrastus, Aristoxenus wrote an extraordinary number of works. Many concerned music; one on Socrates contained evidence independent of Plato and Xenophon. At least five concerned Pythagoreanism: The Life of Pythagoras, On Pythagoras and His Associates, On the Pythagorean Way of Life, Life of Archytas, and the Pythagorean Precepts. This last one, as Carl Huffman...
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  39.  6
    Working From Within: The Nature and Development of Quine’s Naturalism by Sander Verhaegh.Sean Morris - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):162-164.
    Verhaegh’s excellent book provides the first complete account of Quine’s naturalism. Guiding Quine’s view is the idea that we cannot stand outside our theory of the world. We are always working from within. Only by understanding this idea do we see what Quine’s naturalism comes to.While many philosophers casually treat Quine’s naturalism as something already well-understood, Verhaegh does not, and he dedicates part 1 to its systematic exposition. According to him, this consists of two components: “the principled rejection of transcendental (...)
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  40.  17
    Where Socratic Akrasia Meets the Platonic Good.Robert Pasnau - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):1-21.
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  41.  2
    Bergson by Mark Sinclair.Tano S. Posteraro - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):161-162.
    Mark Sinclair’s book is the first attempt at a comprehensive introduction to Bergson to be published in English in the last decade. Bergson begins with an intellectual biography, intended as “the most extensive... available in English”. It is. It is also among the most accomplished chapters of the book. Chapter 2, on time, initiates the book’s overview of the main topics of Bergson’s thinking and introduces its methodology. Sinclair systematically reconstructs Bergson’s positions instead of following the way they unfold in (...)
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  42.  1
    Experimenting at the Boundaries of Life: Organic Vitality in Germany Around 1800 by Joan Steigerwald.Sebastian G. Rand - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):154-155.
    Throughout her wide-ranging study of methods, concepts, and controversies in the life sciences in Germany around 1800, Joan Steigerwald handles an astonishing variety of sources with insight and verve. The story she tells, in both its sweep and its details, challenges entrenched habits and comfortable assumptions of the existing literature and deepens our understanding of the relevant topics, figures, and debates.The book has a substantial introduction, six chapters, and a brief conclusion. The introduction addresses both general and topic-specific historiological concerns, (...)
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  43.  8
    Overstraining Human Nature in the Nicomachean Ethics.Doug Reed - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):45-67.
    In this paper, I investigate Aristotle’s claim in 'Nicomachean Ethics' III.1 about situations that “overstrain human nature.” By setting out and answering several interpretative questions about such situations, I offer a comprehensive interpretation of this passage. I argue that in (at least some of) these cases, the agent voluntarily does something wrong, even though there is a right action available. Furthermore, I argue that Aristotle would think it is possible for a rare agent to perform the right action in (at (...)
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  44.  3
    Lessing and the Art of History.Samuel A. Stoner - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):93-112.
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