Year:

  1.  6
    Kant's Modal Metaphysics by Nicholas F. Stang.Uygar Abaci - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):169-170.
    Nick Stang offers an extremely meticulous and original study of Immanuel Kant’s theory of modality. It is the first book dedicated solely to Kantian modality in the Anglophone Kant literature, crowning the recent surge of articles on the subject, while also setting up a fertile ground for further discussion. The book’s appeal is not limited to Kant readers. Considering its historical focus and scope, Stang’s book is unusually rigorous, analytically argued, and well informed by twentieth-century modal metaphysics and logic, making (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  6
    Hobbes on Mind: Practical Deliberation, Reasoning, and Language.Arash Abizadeh - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):1-34.
    it is widely known that thomas hobbes aspired to re-establish science, including the science of mind, will, and action, on a thoroughly materialist, mechanist, and determinist foundation.1 He found the view of human agency defended by late scholastics such as Francisco Suárez so nonsensical that he declared adherence to it “rightly... numbred amongst the many sorts of Madnesse.”2 On the “Mad” view of his scholastic predecessors, voluntary action arises from an incorporeal faculty, namely the will, which is free, self-determining, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  2
    Consciousness in Locke by Shelley Weinberg.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):164-165.
    Shelley Weinberg’s Consciousness in Locke builds on her previous journal articles and makes significant contributions to John Locke scholarship by offering the first systematic study of consciousness throughout Locke’s Essay. According to Weinberg, consciousness for Locke is self-referential, non-evaluative awareness internal to every thought or perception. She argues that once we realize the complexity of any perception—namely that every perception involves, “at the very least, an act of perception, an idea perceived, and consciousness ” —we can see that Locke’s conception (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  1
    Fichte's Ethical Thought by Allen W. Wood.A. Buchanan Caroline & Breazeale Daniel - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):170-171.
    Fichte’s Ethical Thought follows a format familiar to those who have read Allen Wood’s books on the ethical thought of Immanuel Kant and G. W. F. Hegel: Wood integrates Johann Gottlieb Fichte’s work into topical chapters, each discussing an important component of Fichte’s ethical system. The text he focuses on, of course, is Fichte’s 1798 System of Ethics, but Fichte scholars will likely be pleased to find that Wood discusses a wide range of Fichte’s Jena-era writings. Wood makes use of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  20
    Kant on Cognition, Givenness, and Ignorance.Andrew Chignell - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):131-142.
    eric watkins and marcus willaschek provide a valuable service to people working on Kant’s epistemology and philosophy of mind by laying out a synoptic picture of Kant’s view of theoretical cognition. Their picture incorporates admirably clear accounts of the familiar building blocks of cognition—sensation, intuition, concept, and judgment—as well as some innovative interpretive theses of their own. Watkins and Willaschek’s basic claim is that, for Kant, theoretical cognition is “a mental state [or “representation”] that determines a given object by attributing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  7
    De Anima by Aristotle.Klaus Corcilius - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):155-156.
    This is the overdue replacement of D. W. Hamlyn’s somewhat dismissive 1968 translation and commentary of the first two books of Aristotle’s De Anima. Hamlyn hardly did justice to this foundational treatise of Aristotle’s science of living beings: not only did he mistake it for a treatise on “the” philosophy of mind, he also did not bother to translate the first book apart from two snippets. Shields’s replacement is entirely free from such vices. It provides a new translation and commentary (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  1
    Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Text of Aristotle's Metaphysics by Mirjam E. Kotwick.Sten Ebbesen - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):159-160.
    This is not a book for the ordinary historian of philosophy. It consists almost exclusively of detailed analyses of the manuscript readings at a few scores of places in Metaphysics A–Δ and Λ, confronting the transmitted readings each time with Alexander of Aphrodisias’s comments on the relevant passage. The reason why only those books are studied is simple: Alexander’s commentary on books E–N was lost before the end of the Byzantine era, but Averroes preserved information about the contents of an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Academic Skepticism in Seventeenth-Century French Philosophy: The Charronian Legacy 1601–1662 by José R. Maia Neto.Luiz Eva - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):163-164.
    Richard Popkin’s seminal study on the revival of skepticism from the late Renaissance onwards gave a prominent role to Pyrrhonism, rediscovered through the translation of Sextus Empiricus’s writings into Latin and their usage in Michel de Montaigne’s Essais, among other works. Maia Neto’s new book aims to reassess this interpretation, claiming that Montaigne’s disciple, Pierre Charron, in his La sagesse, displayed a distinctively Academic skeptical wisdom that became central in the philosophical debate of the period. Such wisdom, according to Maia (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Scottish Philosophy in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries Ed. By Gordon Graham.David Fergusson - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):174-175.
    The latest volume in the OUP History of Philosophy series comprises twelve essays, which provide in-depth study of a selection of philosophers who worked in the four ancient Scottish universities after 1800. Particular attention is dedicated to Thomas Brown, William Hamilton, James Frederick Ferrier, Alexander Bain, George Davie, and John Macmurray. Further chapters are devoted to the Scottish interpretation of Kant, idealism, and the international exporting of Scottish philosophy, especially its reception in American pragmatism. Introductory and concluding essays by the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  1
    Plato on the Metaphysical Foundation of Meaning and Truth by Blake E. Hestir.Fink Jakob Leth - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):153-154.
    This study defends the view that Plato’s account of meaning and truth does not depend on strong Platonism. Strong Platonism is based, among other things, on the assumption that basic entities are pure and cannot mix with anything. In a semantic theory, such entities provide stability of reference to single terms and so keep the danger of fluctuating meanings at bay. Unfortunately, strong Platonism pays a heavy price for this stability in that it cannot explain how terms can be combined (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  1
    Hume's Sceptical Enlightenment by Ryu Susato.Peter S. Fosl - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):165-166.
    This rich and detailed volume reads David Hume as a skeptic, but Susato is less interested in dissecting Hume’s particular skeptical arguments and more concerned with what he regards as Hume’s larger skeptical vision as it relates to his social and political thought. Susato argues against the idea that Hume’s historical work is independent of his philosophical skepticism; and he opposes the idea that Hume ought best to be read as a conservative thinker. Broadly speaking, the question Susato addresses is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  7
    Givenness, Objective Reality, and A Priori Intuitions.Stefanie Grüne - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):113-130.
    in kant’s account of cognition, Eric Watkins and Marcus Willaschek distinguish between a ‘broad’ and ‘narrow’ sense of Kant’s use of the term ‘cognition.’ Every “conscious representation that represents an object” counts as a cognition, taken in the broad sense.1 Every “conscious representation of a given object and of its general features” counts as a cognition in the narrow sense.2 In the case of finite beings, they argue, cognition in the narrow sense must fulfill two conditions: First, the object must (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  4
    Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato Ed. By Debra Nails and Harold Tarrant.Verity Harte - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):154-155.
    Tradition has it that ‘deuteros plous’, an idiomatic expression used by Plato most famously at Phaedo 99c–d, refers to the use of oars to get to one’s destination in the absence of suitable wind for sailing. The nautical motif is a gesture towards the seafaring credentials of Holger Thesleff, the scholar to whom the volume pays tribute, the author, most notably for this occasion, of three books and several articles on the style, chronology and metaphysical outlook of Plato’s dialogues, now (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  4
    Hegel's Theory of Intelligibility by Rocío Zambrana.Stephen Houlgate - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):172-173.
    This is a rich and thought-provoking study of Hegel’s all-too-often neglected masterpiece, the Science of Logic. Zambrana draws on commentators, such as Robert Pippin, Robert Brandom and Karin de Boer, to construct a highly original and challenging interpretation of the Logic. Her principal thesis is that, for Hegel, our conceptions of nature, self, and society are not simply given to us but are the “product of reason”. More precisely, such conceptions, through which we render the world and ourselves intelligible, are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  3
    The Trouble with Feelings, or Spinoza on the Identity of Power and Essence.Karolina Hübner - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):35-53.
    one of spinoza’s fundamental assumptions as a philosopher is that metaphysics provides necessary and sufficient foundations for psychological theory and moral philosophy. This is the assumption that gives the Ethics its basic architecture, as it moves from claims about substance to a catalogue of human emotions or ‘affects.’ As may be expected, given this assumption, at least some of the concepts that Spinoza first develops in the context of his metaphysics continue to do work in his discussions of psychology and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  2
    Aristotle's Ethics and Medieval Philosophy: Moral Goodness and Practical Wisdom by Anthony Celano.Katja Krause - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):160-161.
    Celano’s book focuses on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and thirteenth-century scholastic appropriations of it. Its objectives are to unravel the inconsistencies in Aristotle’s accounts of eudaimonia, to establish the prominence of phronesis, and to reveal alterations of Aristotle’s phronesis in medieval moral thought. Celano’s textual analyses are laborious, and some features of his story may be considered stimulating insights. His construal of phronesis as primary to Aristotle’s moral conception, his emphasis on Albert’s contribution to medieval moral thought, and his inclusion of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  2
    The Nietzschean Self: Moral Psychology, Agency, and the Unconscious by Paul Katsafanas.Karl Laderoute - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):173-174.
    In his new book, Paul Katsafanas aims to offer “a comprehensive account” of Nietzsche’s “analysis of the human self” in order to “uncover Nietzsche’s moral psychology”. The goal is admirable, and The Nietzschean Self has considerable merit. On the whole, it is well organized and clearly written, and some of the interpretive theses Katsafanas advocates present an intriguing countercurrent to some of the most popular views in contemporary Nietzsche scholarship. For example, Katsafanas argues that “Nietzsche does not deny the causal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Hume's True Scepticism by Donald C. Ainslie.Miriam Schleifer McCormick - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):167-168.
    In this rigorous and thorough discussion of David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature 1.4, entitled “Of the sceptical and other systems of philosophy,” Donald Ainslie aims both to provide detailed textual exegeses of all seven sections, and to offer a way of understanding them as unified by the recurring theme of the dangers of “false” philosophy and a defense of “true” philosophy or “true scepticism.” To understand the compatibility of Hume’s skeptical conclusions and his philosophical ambitions, and so to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  1
    French Philosophy, 1572–1675 by Desmond Clarke.Michael Moriarty - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):162-163.
    Desmond Clarke adopts a broad understanding of the term ‘philosophy,’ informed by close attention to historical context. He discusses the limitations of early modern philosophy as an academic discipline, plausibly connecting its tendency to conservatism with the fact that philosophy teachers were generally recent graduates, employed for quite short periods, and thus ill-equipped to develop the subject. On the other hand, as he observes, “what is now described as philosophical reasoning or analysis was widely distributed in the publications of lawyers, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  4
    Toward a Humean True Religion: Genuine Theism, Moderate Hope, and Practical Morality by Andre C. Willis.Paul Russell - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):168-169.
    Andre Willis argues that although Hume is generally credited with being a “devastating critic” of religion, it is a mistake to view Hume solely in these terms or to present him as an “atheist.” This not only represents a failure to appreciate Hume’s “middle path” between “militant atheists and evangelical theists”, it denies us an opportunity to “enhance” our understanding and appreciation of the positive, constructive value of religion through a close study of Hume’s views. Willis’s study presents Hume as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  1
    Circling to Scientia: Reading Descartes in Light of the Debate Between Stoic Dogmatists and Academic Skeptics.Stuchlik Joshua - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):55-81.
    At the end of the Fifth Meditation, Descartes has the Meditator proclaim: “the certainty and truth of all knowledge depends uniquely on my awareness of the true God, to such an extent that I was incapable of perfect knowledge [perfecte scire] of anything else until I became aware of him”. Not so, complained the Second Objectors, for it seems an atheist can know, in the sense of being “clearly and distinctly aware,” that the angles of a triangle are equal to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  2
    A New Text of Apuleius: The Lost Third Book of the De Platone by Justin A. Stover.Harold Tarrant - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):158-159.
    The publication of a new text on ancient philosophy tends to be an exciting event, but there can be years between discovery and availability. This is an extreme case. Raymond Klibansky discovered the text in 1949 and transcribed it, making it available to friends who were under an obligation not to anticipate his publication of it—which failed to happen. It contains summaries, of very different lengths, of the doctrinal content of thirteen Platonic dialogues. I saw the transcription of this so-called (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  8
    Givenness and Cognition: Reply to Grüne and Chignell.Watkins Eric & Willaschek Marcus - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):143-152.
    stefanie grüne takes issue with our claim that for an object to be given, this object must exist. On her view, givenness, according to Kant, does not require the existence of the object, but only its real possibility. She develops her critique in three steps. First, she argues that the reason why Kant requires objects to be given in intuition is that otherwise our concepts would not have ‘objective reality’ and would thus not constitute cognitions. But since the objective reality (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  19
    Kant's Account of Cognition.Eric Watkins & Marcus Willaschek - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):83-112.
    kant’s critique of pure reason undertakes a systematic investigation of the possibility of synthetic cognition a priori so as to determine whether this kind of cognition is possible in the case of traditional metaphysics.1 While much scholarly attention has been devoted to the distinction between analytic and synthetic judgments as well as to that between the a priori and the a posteriori, less attention has been devoted to understanding exactly what cognition is for Kant. In particular, it is often insufficiently (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  3
    Aristotle on Female Animals: A Study of the Generation of Animals by Sophia M. Connell.Charlotte Witt - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):157-158.
    “How can it be that the female is both functional and a failure?”. Sophia Connell’s response comes in the form of a careful, thorough, and philosophically sensitive interpretation of Aristotle’s treatise on animal generation. By pursuing the topic of what Aristotle says about female animals and their role in reproduction, Connell casts light into many difficult corners of his theory: What does it mean to say that the male is the “hê archê [tês] kinêseos” of the generation? How should we (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues