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  1.  3
    Plato on the Value of Philosophy by Tushar Irani.R. Bensen Cain - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):747-748.
    Irani takes a strongly thematic and interpretive approach to Plato's dialogues by working through a system of interdependent concepts and arguments that are central to understanding Plato's views on philosophy, its value, and methods. One may approach the network of themes in various ways, but a natural starting point is with the preface, introduction, and Irani's description of the book as "primarily a work of interpretation" of two Platonic dialogues that constitute its subject matter, the Gorgias and Phaedrus.In the introduction, (...)
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  2.  2
    The Metaphysics of the "Divided Line" in Proclus: A Sample of Pythagorean Theology.Pieter D'Hoine - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):575-599.
    the famous passage at the end of the sixth book of the Republic, in which Socrates compares our cognitive states to different sections of a single line, is often read as a "map" of Plato's epistemology. Symbolizing the different levels of cognition, the divided line may be taken to present a forceful image of the various stages that the soul must traverse in its quest for true knowledge. Its reputation as a snapshot of the epistemology of Plato's mature dialogues makes (...)
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  3.  3
    Berkeley's Non-Cartesian Notion of Spiritual Substance.Stephen H. Daniel - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):659-682.
    As central as the notion of mind is for Berkeley, it is not surprising that what he means by mind stirs debate. At issue are questions about not only what kind of thing a mind is but also how we can know it. This convergence of ontological and epistemological interests in discussing mind has led some commentators to argue that Berkeley's appeal to the Cartesian vocabulary of 'spiritual substance' signals his appropriation of elements of Descartes's theory of mind. But in (...)
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  4.  1
    Self-Awareness in Islamic Philosophy: Avicenna and Beyond by Jari Kaukua.R. E. Houseker - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):750-751.
    Kaukua's book will appeal to two audiences: historians of Islamic philosophy and philosophers concerned with postmodern theories of the self.It begins with Avicenna's Gedankenexperiment, the flying man, "imagined created all at once and perfect … as though floating in air or a void," completely bereft of sensations. This image is the capstone of Avicenna's two-stage argument for the existence and nature of the soul. Considering the soul in relation to other things, we see it is not a body, but a (...)
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  5.  2
    Moral Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain: God, Self, and Other by Colin Heydt.James A. Harris - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):759-760.
    "There is in Ethicks as in most Sciences," Thomas Reid told the students in his moral philosophy class, "a Speculative and a practical Part. … The proper object of the Theory of Morals is to explain the Constitution of the human Mind so far as regards Morals, that is to explain the Moral and active Powers of the human Mind." He continued: "The various Theorists disagree not about what is to be accounted virtuous Conduct but why it is so to (...)
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  6.  6
    Brentano's Mind by Mark Textor. [REVIEW]Carlo Ierna - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):763-764.
    Marx Textor's Brentano's Mind begins with a short, illuminating introduction which clearly sets out the author's main aims. The two questions Textor wants to consider are, "What is the nature of mind?" and, "What is the structure of consciousness?" From the outset, Textor explicitly states that his intent is not to provide a historically plausible exegesis of "Brentano's often dense and difficult texts", but to take his "bold, suggestive, and influential" answers to these questions as an inspiration for new systematic (...)
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  7.  14
    Stephen Voss (Ed.), The Leibniz-Arnauld Correspondence: With Selections From the Correspondence with Ernst, Landgrave of Hessen-Rheinfels by G. W. Leibniz. [REVIEW]Julia Jorati - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):757-758.
    In February 1686, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz sent a letter to Antoine Arnauld, via their mutual friend Ernst, the Landgrave of Hessen-Rheinfels. This letter contained a short summary of Leibniz's most recent philosophical work, the Discourse on Metaphysics, and asked Arnauld for his reaction to it. Arnauld's response was extremely harsh: he called Leibniz's views shocking and useless and advised him to stop engaging in metaphysical speculations. Yet, Leibniz did not let this discourage him. In the exchange that followed, Leibniz was (...)
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  8.  4
    The Oxford Handbook of Spinoza Ed. By Michael Della Rocca.Michael LeBuffe - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):755-756.
    Della Rocca's edited volume offers notable contributions to our understanding of Spinoza and his place in the history of philosophy. It will be a valuable resource for students and scholars alike. Its twenty-seven chapters are impossible to survey in a short review. I will focus here on a few exceptional entries.Among essays that introduce students to particular topics, Yitzhak Melamed's account of the central notions of Spinoza's metaphysics and Rebecca Newberger Goldstein's contribution on Spinoza's influence on literature stand out. Although (...)
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  9.  5
    Poetic Justice: Rereading Plato’s Republic by Jill Frank.Susan B. Levin - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):748-749.
    According to Frank, Plato's dialogues offer divergent approaches to literacy: while one method is rigidly top-down, the other promotes learners' independence. She argues that Plato endorses the latter view and that this lens on becoming literate is also the one he favors for our acquisition of knowledge, as well as for ethics and politics. Dismissing the idea that Plato's thought developed, Frank moves without comment from the Republic to works usually deemed to belong to different phases of Plato's writing, both (...)
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  10.  9
    The Poverty of Conceptual Truth: Kant's Analytic/Synthetic Distinction and the Limits of Metaphysics by R. Lanier Anderson.Huaping Lu-Adler - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):761-763.
    This book is a masterpiece on Kant's theory of analyticity. It culminates in a new story of how Kant arrived at his mature view. Here is the chief lesson of this story: "the logical conception of the analytic/synthetic distinction is the fundamental idea of analyticity involved in Kant's distinctive, critical project. … [H]is critique of metaphysics crucially depends on the logical conception and cannot be supported by its merely methodological and epistemological ancestors". This passage consolidates two leading theses of the (...)
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  11.  6
    Leibniz on Church and State: Presumptive Logic and Perplexing Cases.Mogens LÆrke - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):629-657.
    this paper has a double objective. On the one hand, it aims to examine Leibniz's approach to church-state relations, a central question in early modern political philosophy that has rarely been discussed in the context of the philosopher of Hanover despite the fact that his political texts contain much to be appreciated on the topic. On the other hand, it aims at providing a prominent example of how Leibniz's political philosophy, contrary to what is often held, was not exclusively grounded (...)
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  12.  2
    The Problem of Universals in Early Modern Philosophy Ed. By Stefano Di Bella and Tad M. Schmaltz.Christopher Martin - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):754-755.
    Di Bella and Schmaltz write in their introduction that the early modern problem of universals originates largely in a turn away from ancient and late-medieval problems. The modern problem, they suggest, investigates universals by asking what it means to include them as contents of our thoughts. The collection of essays that follows demonstrates persuasively, however, that we should resist the impulse, no matter how heuristic, to regard each era as having its own—much less a single—problem of universals. Despite the variety (...)
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  13.  4
    Working Out the Details of Hume and Smith on Sympathy.John McHugh - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):683-696.
    many scholars have had interesting things to say about the relationship between Adam Smith's and David Hume's theories of sympathy. The diversity of angles taken in these discussions demonstrates how fertile a topic of investigation this relationship is. There have been excellent discussions of the role that sympathy plays in each philosopher's account of moral judgment,1 of how sympathy functions in their attacks on egoism,2 of how to situate their theories in relation to the concept of empathy,3 of how to (...)
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  14.  1
    Herder's Hermeneutics: History, Poetry, Enlightenment by Kristin Gjesdal.Kurt C. M. Mertel - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):758-759.
    In spite of his status as a highly original thinker whose views were, in many ways, ahead of his time and anticipate those of more famous successors, the work of Johann Gottfried von Herder has not received the attention it deserves in mainstream philosophical discourse. In Herder's Hermeneutics, Kristin Gjesdal successfully addresses this deficit by exploring the enlightenment origins of the hermeneutic tradition through a careful and compelling reconstruction of Herder's theory of interpretation. Breaking with the widespread view of Herder (...)
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  15.  1
    Herder's Hermeneutics: History, Poetry, Enlightenment by Kristin Gjesdal.Kurt G. M. Mertel - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):758-759.
    In spite of his status as a highly original thinker whose views were, in many ways, ahead of his time and anticipate those of more famous successors, the work of Johann Gottfried von Herder has not received the attention it deserves in mainstream philosophical discourse. In Herder's Hermeneutics, Kristin Gjesdal successfully addresses this deficit by exploring the enlightenment origins of the hermeneutic tradition through a careful and compelling reconstruction of Herder's theory of interpretation. Breaking with the widespread view of Herder (...)
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  16.  3
    Kant's Stance on the Relationalist-Substantivalist Debate and Its Justification.James Messina - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):697-726.
    kant famously claims that space is merely a feature of the mind—something subjective—rather than a mind-independent feature of reality in itself.1 In accepting the subjectivity thesis, Kant rejects the transcendental realist assumption that he thinks has traditionally, albeit tacitly, been made in debates about the nature of space. According to this assumption, space has to do with things in themselves. For the Newtonians, as Kant understands their position, space is a substance-like thing in itself; for the Leibnizians, space consists in (...)
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  17.  5
    Logic, Judgment, and Inference: What Frege Should Have Said About Illogical Thought.Daniele Mezzadri - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):727-746.
    this paper aims to contribute to the scholarly debate about Frege's discussion of the possibility of illogical thought in the introduction to The Basic Laws of Arithmetic. There, Frege imagines beings "whose laws of thought flatly contradicted ours, so that their application often led to opposite results,"1 namely, beings who straightforwardly and systematically judge and infer illogically: they thus represent a radical example of illogical thought. The literature on this aspect of Frege's views on the relation between logic and thought (...)
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  18.  3
    Thomism in the Renaissance: Fifty Years After Kristeller. Divus Thomas 120 Ed. By Alison Frazier.John Monfasani - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):753-754.
    In his long scholarly career, Paul Oskar Kristeller produced an extraordinary number of seminal books and articles, one of which was the 1967 monograph Le Thomisme et la pensée italienne de la Renaissance, which presented the evidence for the intellectual vitality of Thomism in the Italian Renaissance. In 2017, on the fiftieth anniversary of Kristeller's book, the collection of articles under review was presented originally as papers at the Chicago meeting of the Renaissance Society of America and brought together for (...)
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  19. Aristotle on Practical Truth by Christiana M. M. Olfert.Allison Murphy - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):749-750.
    Olfert argues that Aristotle's account of practical reason pays equal deference to the value of truth and to the value of acting well; she further argues that the key to a proper understanding of the relationship between these two values lies in Aristotle's heretofore overlooked notion of practical truth.Practical truth is not the truth of a motivational state, nor is it a truth that is made true by actions, nor is it even a correct assertion about the means to the (...)
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  20.  8
    Representation and Scepticism From Aquinas to Descartes by Han Thomas Adriaenssen. [REVIEW]Walter Ott - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):752-753.
    It is by now a truism that early modern debates are heavily indebted to their medieval antecedents. Just in what way, and to what degree, is controversial. Han Thomas Adriaenssen's excellent book follows its topics from the medieval controversy over species through the early moderns. A final part gives an overview of the debates. Throughout, Adriaenssen's work achieves a high level of clarity and insight.The chief subject of controversy is indirect realism, the view that an extra-mental object x "is cognized (...)
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  21.  2
    Translation or Alteration? Grosseteste's Latin Version of Aristotle's Account of Natural Justice.José A. Poblete - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):601-627.
    it may be debatable whether or not the passage on natural justice from the Nicomachean Ethics is a crucial component of Aristotle's account of justice and politics; nonetheless, its enormous influence on western ethical and juridical theory is unquestionable. This influence is largely due to the enthusiastic reception of that passage by medieval thinkers who paid somewhat exaggerated attention to this brief and obscure passage.The thirteenth-century philosophical scene has rightly been described as an 'Aristotelian crisis.' The general Christian view of (...)
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  22.  5
    Thinking with Kant's Critique of Judgment by Michel Chaouli.Emine Hande Tuna - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):762-763.
    Books on Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment usually fall into one of the following sorts: introductions, in-depth companions, scholarly work offering specific interpretations of certain aspects of the book. Where does Michel Chaouli's book fit within this taxonomy? Reading the preface and the first few dozen pages, one gets the impression that it falls under the third rubric, aiming to defend a specific interpretation of Kant's aesthetic theory: in making a judgment of taste, our imagination is productive; it (...)
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  23.  8
    Descartes, la Métaphysique Et l'Infini by Dan Arbib.Igor Agostini - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):562-563.
    Dan Arbib's book follows the numerous studies devoted, in the last twenty years, to the topic of the infinite in Descartes. For the first time, however, with Arbib's work, this question is addressed thematically.Its fundamental purpose is the demonstration of what Arbib calls an "induction a priori" : the Cartesian infinite belongs, and at the same time does not belong, to metaphysics as ontotheology. The verification of this hypothesis depends on a "non-negotiable condition" : the infinite belongs to metaphysics insofar (...)
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  24.  2
    Success and Suppression: Arabic Sciences and Philosophy in the Renaissance by Dag Nicolaus Hasse.Paul J. J. M. Bakker - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):557-558.
    Historiography of Renaissance philosophy and science has long been characterized by tendencies to minimize the influence of medieval Arabic philosophy and science. According to the standard narrative, the humanists successfully eliminated Arabic writers, along with their Latin scholastic interpreters. Against this background, Dag Nikolaus Hasse calls for a "sober historical approach" in order to "assess the factual influence of Arabic sciences and philosophy in the Renaissance". His narrative is summarized by the title of his impressively erudite and well-documented...
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  25.  12
    Plutarch's Epicurean Justification of Religious Belief.Jason W. Carter - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):385-412.
    In his dialogue, 'Non posse suaviter vivi secundum Epicurum', Plutarch of Chaeronea criticizes Epicurus for not believing that the gods are provident over human affairs and for not believing that our souls survive death. However, Plutarch’s arguments are striking in that they do not offer any theoretical justification for believing either of these religious claims to be true; rather, they aim to establish that we are practically justified in adopting them if we follow Epicurus’s rule that the goal of belief (...)
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  26.  10
    Thomas Reid and the Problem of Secondary Qualities by Christopher A. Shrock. [REVIEW]Rebecca Copenhaver - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):566-567.
    Philosophers from the modern age and current philosophers share some common concerns. One is whether the ordinary objects of human perception—the objects humans see, hear, feel, taste, and smell—exist independently of our perception of them in a shared, stable, spatially-localized environment that also exists independently of perception. Another is whether a particular range of properties—colors, flavors, odors, sounds, feels—are properties of the ordinary objects of human perception, relations whose relata are properties of ordinary objects and types of typical human experiences, (...)
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  27.  7
    Francis Bacon on Motion and Power Eds. By Guido Giglioni Et Al.Claire Crignon - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):559-560.
    Francis Bacon on Motion and Power gathers twelve contributions by the best specialists of Baconian thought in Europe, the United States, and South America in a very unified manner. Since Graham Rees founded The Oxford Francis Bacon Project in 1995, research on Francis Bacon's work has made significant progress. Romanian researchers have offered translations of major works, such as Novum Organum and Sylva Sylvarum. An important project of translation of Bacon's works into French is also underway. A new generation of (...)
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  28.  6
    Reflecting Subjects: Passion, Sympathy, and Society in Hume's Philosophy by Jacqueline A. Taylor.Remy Debes - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):567-568.
    In this entry to David Hume scholarship, Jacqueline Taylor brings together a line of interpretation she has been developing over several years, connecting Hume's theory of the passions to what she calls Hume's "social theory." Through a concise, well-organized argument, the book offers insights into how one of the Enlightenment's most famous and gifted thinkers conceptualized social roles and institutions, the ways we navigate these roles and institutions, and how all this connects to the kind of creature we are. It (...)
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  29.  4
    Die Aristotelische Logik—Erklärt von Ihren Antiken Interpreten by Beatrix Freibert.Paolo Fait - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):554-555.
    Aristotle's Organon received sedulous attention throughout late antiquity. This is reflected in the surviving corpus of commentaries written, in different exegetical and didactic styles, by peripatetic and Platonic authors. Does this collection constitute a single tradition? Beatrix Freibert is confident that the answer to this difficult question is yes, and sets out to explain the differences and vindicate the connectedness of what she takes to be a unified intellectual construction. She insists that, despite the many peculiarities, all commentators participate in (...)
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  30.  3
    From Natural Character to Moral Virtue in Aristotle by Mariska Leunissen.Paula Gottlieb - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):552-553.
    In her new book, Leunissen, author of Explanation and Teleology in Aristotle's Science of Nature, turns her expertise in Aristotle's biology to the issue of virtue of character. The book contains some fascinating material from Aristotle's biological works and also material from relatively neglected parts of the Politics, including discussions of ethnography, climate, physiognomy, and "eugenics." Leunissen's thesis is that an examination of this material will provide insight into how people become morally virtuous, and especially why Aristotle excludes women from (...)
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  31.  3
    Fichte's Foundations of Natural Right: A Critical Guide Ed. By Gabriel Gottlieb.Steven Hoeltzel - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):569-570.
    This excellent collection features consistently illuminating and often groundbreaking work on issues raised by Fichte's philosophy of right. All twelve chapters make new contributions to specialized debates. Most will be accessible to nonspecialists nonetheless, and many will richly repay careful consideration by readers interested in Fichte, post-Kantian political theory, or classic debates about rights and the state.Fichte's Foundations of Natural Right breaks with prior Kantian tradition by insisting on a strict separation of right from morality. Angelica Nuzzo discerns a systematic (...)
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  32.  3
    Geometrical Figures in Spinoza's Book of Nature.Matthew Homan - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):455-476.
    the view of spinoza as a scion of the mathematico-mechanistic tradition of Galileo and Descartes, albeit perhaps an idiosyncratic one, has been held by many commentators and might be considered standard.1 Although the standard view has a prima facie solid basis in Spinoza's conception of the physical world as extended, law-bound, and deterministic, it has come under sustained criticism of late. Arguing that, for Spinoza, numbers and figures are mere beings of reason and mathematical conceptions of nature belong to the (...)
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  33.  9
    Averroes' Natural Philosophy and its Reception in the Latin West Ed. By Paul J. J. M. Bakker.Taneli Kukkonen - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):558-559.
    The volume under review presents the state of the art when it comes to tracking the reception of Ibn Rushd, the famed Aristotelian commentator from Andalusia, within medieval Latin philosophy. These are all very high-quality essays, each brimming with subtle insights into the way that themes and philosophical puzzles in Aristotle were framed in Averroes's works through the lens of late antique commentary, and how the Latin scholastics then furthered the agenda through their own creative work as well as further (...)
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  34.  5
    Aristotle on Religion by Mor Segev.Robert Mayhew - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):553-554.
    Here is the problem: Aristotle seems clearly to reject the traditional Olympian gods. His own conception of god seems to have no religious significance; for whatever else this god knows, it certainly does not know particulars, including humans and their characters, actions, and futures. Yet in the Politics, Aristotle includes priests as public officials and lands devoted to the traditional gods as necessary parts of his ideal polis, and he even seems to regard the Oracle of Delphi as an important (...)
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  35.  14
    Kant's Gesinnung.Julia Peters - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):497-518.
    One of the most important developments in the past decades of scholarship on Kant's practical philosophy is a growing interest in his conception of moral character, especially in his conception of virtue. Focusing especially on his later works in moral philosophy, such as the Doctrine of Virtue in his Metaphysics of Morals, commentators have shown that Kant possesses a rich, elaborate account of moral virtue. This has brought partly unexpected aspects of Kantian moral philosophy to new light. We can no (...)
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  36.  2
    Augustine and the Transcendent Vision of Other Souls.David G. Robertson - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):413-427.
    We mortals can't read other people's minds directly. But we make good guesses from what they say, what we read between the lines, what they show in their face and eyes, and what best explains their behavior. It is our species' most remarkable talent.1augustine's reflections on the topic of seeing other souls have attracted interest in recent years. It is generally supposed in the scholarly literature that his view that our mental lives are essentially private leads to a deep-seated concern (...)
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  37.  7
    Rereading Ancient Philosophy: Old Chestnuts and Sacred Cows Eds. By Verity Harte and Raphael Woolf.Christopher Rowe - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):551-552.
    The "old chestnuts" of this engaging volume are, to quote its cover, "well-known passages in the works of ancient philosophers about which one might have thought everything there is to say has already been said"; its "sacred cows" are "views about what ancient philosophers thought, on issues of philosophical importance, that have attained the status of near-unquestioned orthodoxy." The degree of success in the targeting of such bovine targets among the thirteen papers is variable: thus Shaul Tor makes short work (...)
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  38.  12
    The Idea of Principles in Early Modern Thought: Interdisciplinary Perspectives Ed. By Peter R. Anstey.Daniel Schneider - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):561-562.
    This book is a collection of essays that relate in some way to the notion of a principle as it appears in early modern thought. Essays by James Franklin, J. C. Campbell, Alberto Vanzo, Anstey, and William R. Newman provide a survey of the usage of principles within particular subjects: the principles of early modern mathematics, equity law, corpuscularism, and chemistry or alchemy, respectively. Other essays, by Kristen Walsh and Michael LeBuffe, clarify a particular early modern thinker's understanding and usage (...)
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  39.  14
    Kant and the Philosophy of Mind: Perception, Reason, and the Self Eds. By Anil Gomes and Andrew Stephenson.Janum Sethi - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):568-569.
    In his useful introduction, Gomes makes clear that a relatively modest claim animates this excellent collection of essays. The editors do not seek to establish that Kant should primarily be seen as a philosopher of mind, but rather, quite simply, that his broader philosophical project requires that he be "engaged in the philosophy of mind". This has allowed them to gather together essays that advance the debate on issues that, quite independently of their classification, have been the subject of much (...)
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  40.  4
    The Topics Transformed: Reframing the Baconian Prerogative Instances.Matthew Sharpe - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):429-454.
    john c. briggs has commented that "The reading of Baconian texts resembles the Baconian reading of nature, for in both the interpreter must discover a clue to the labyrinth."1 This thought certainly applies to the Praerogatiuis Instantiarum and their precise role in Bacon's Novum Organum.2 These instances occupy thirty-one of the fifty-two sections of Novum Organum II, whereas only nine are devoted to the much better-known work of the tabulation of affirmative, negative and deviating instances, and one long section on (...)
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  41.  4
    Herder: Philosophy and Anthropology Eds. By Anik Waldow and Nigel DeSouza.Vicki A. Spencer - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):564-565.
    Herder: Philosophy and Anthropology is an important and refreshing contribution to the growing literature in English on the philosophy of Johnann Gottfried Herder. Anik Waldrow and Nigel DeSouza have brought together an impressive array of contributors—a number who are well-established within Herder scholarship and others newer to his thought—to produce an interesting collection of essays exploring Herder's philosophical anthropology.The implications of Herder's attempt to place the human agent at the core of philosophy is a broad theme, with the collection offering (...)
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  42. Emilie du Chatelet's Metaphysics of Substance.Marius Stan - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):477-496.
    much early modern metaphysics grew with an eye to the new science of its time, but few figures took it as seriously as Emilie du Châtelet. Happily, her oeuvre is now attracting close, renewed attention, and so the time is ripe for looking into her metaphysical foundation for empirical theory. Accordingly, I move here to do just that. I establish two conclusions. First, du Châtelet's basic metaphysics is a robust realism. Idealist strands, while they exist, are confined to non-basic regimes. (...)
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  43.  11
    Science and Two Kinds of Knowledge: Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, and the Ignorabimus-Streit.Timothy Stoll - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):519-549.
    This paper offers a new interpretation of Nietzsche’s conception of scientific explanation that promises to resolve the apparent tension between his insistence on the veracity of such explanations, and his frequent attempts to impugn their cognitive reach. Nietzsche follows earlier nineteenth-century critiques of science in claiming that science yields only factual or “descriptive” knowledge, not understanding. The paper concludes that the conception of descriptive knowledge is robust and compatible with Nietzsche’s commitment to the truth and rigor of scientific theories. The (...)
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  44.  9
    Olimpiodoro d'Alessandria: Tutti I Commentari a Platone Trans. And Ed. By Francesca Filippi.Harold Tarrant - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):555-557.
    For those of us who do not idealize Proclus's contribution to Platonic scholarship, which is influenced excessively by the conviction that Orphic and Chaldaean texts are working within the same system, the commentaries of Olympiodorus can represent a substantial step forward. The range of issues tackled in his commentaries is often much closer to that expected of a modern commentary than those of his illustrious Athenian predecessor. This is not entirely new, since much the same could be said of Hermias, (...)
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  45.  13
    Fifteen Sermons and Other Writings on Ethics by Joseph Butler. [REVIEW]Ralph Wedgwood - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):563-564.
    As a young Anglican clergyman, Joseph Butler published the first edition of his Fifteen Sermons Preached at the Rolls Chapel in 1721; a revised edition appeared in 1729. Almost immediately, it was widely understood that these sermons present a strikingly subtle and careful form of a relatively traditional conception of ethics, in contrast to the more radical views of other philosophers such as Thomas Hobbes. Only a few years later, David Hume was much concerned to assimilate Butler's insights, while himself (...)
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  46.  6
    Aristotle on Knowledge and Learning: The Posterior Analytics by David Bronstein.James Allen - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):362-363.
    David Bronstein’s book tackles Aristotle’s account, as presented in the Posterior Analytics, of knowledge, or rather a privileged form of it, ‘scientific knowledge’ or ‘understanding.’ We know in this way by grasping arguments of a certain kind, demonstrations, for which reason Aristotle devotes much of his attention in the Posterior Analytics to demonstrative argument. The subject is as important as anything in Aristotle, and it presents challenges as difficult as any confronting his interpreters elsewhere, which Bronstein’s book tackles skillfully and (...)
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  47.  11
    The Beauty of Science Without the Science of Beauty: Kant and the Rationalists on the Aesthetics of Cognition.Angela Breitenbach - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):281-304.
    it is common to praise the beauty of theories, the elegance of proofs, and the pleasing simplicity of explanations. We may admire, for example, the beauty of Einstein’s theory of general relativity, the simplicity of Darwin’s idea of natural selection, and the elegance of a geometrical proof of Pythagoras’s theorem. Aesthetic judgments such as these have much currency among scientists, and they are employed in the search for knowledge more broadly. But while the use of aesthetic judgments in science is (...)
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  48.  13
    Beauty and Utility in Kant’s Aesthetics: The Origins of Adherent Beauty.Robert R. Clewis - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):305-335.
    within western philosophy, there is a long and rich tradition of treating the beautiful and the good as closely related and mutually reinforcing.1 Different models of the relation have been proposed. An ‘identity’ model can be seen in Plato’s identification of the beautiful and the good in the Symposium and perhaps in the Greek notion of kalokagathia.2 Yet, according to Plato’s Republic, the form of the good illuminates, and differs from, the forms of beauty and truth: “both knowledge and truth (...)
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  49.  1
    The Arguments of Aquinas: A Philosophical View by J. J. MacIntosh.Brian Davies - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):367-368.
    Aquinas never describes himself as a ‘philosopher.’ He typically uses that word when referring to such “pagans” as Aristotle. Yet he often presents what we can now view as purely philosophical arguments. And it is some of these with which MacIntosh is concerned in this fine new book, which is divided into three parts, as is Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae. MacIntosh has previously published two books on Robert Boyle, who features from time to time in the present volume.In part 1, “Natural (...)
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  50.  3
    The Virtue Ethics of Levi Gersonides by Alexander Green.Idit Dobbs-Weinstein - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):368-369.
    The works of Gersonides encompass science, philosophy, and biblical exegesis. The majority of the philosophical writings are constituted by supercommentaries on Averroes’s commentaries on Aristotle’s works, whereas his magnum opus, The Wars of the Lord, encompasses all three genres. Since these works engage his preeminent predecessors, Maimonides and Averroes, and since Gersonides explains the motivation to composing the Wars as a concern for human flourishing, the absence of a supercommentary on the Nicomachean Ethics is striking.The Virtue Ethics of Levi Gersonides (...)
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  51.  13
    Quatenus and Spinoza’s Monism.Alexander Douglas - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):261-280.
    spinoza holds that god is the only substance and that ordinary things are modes of that substance. Precisely what this entails as a metaphysical thesis is a matter of contention, but it has been criticized on logical grounds. Briefly, the criticism is as follows. Assuming that only a substance can be a proper subject of predication, it follows from Spinoza’s thesis that all predications correctly made of ordinary things must be properly made of God.1 This leads to contradiction. As some (...)
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  52.  4
    The Aristotelian Tradition: Aristotle’s Works on Logic and Metaphysics and Their Reception in the Middle Ages Ed. By Börje Bydén, Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist.Luca Gili - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):364-365.
    In today’s academia, scholars are compelled to be productive. The result is an overabundance of publications that often are formulaic follow-ups to the debates du jour. The essays included in this collection are a fortunate exception to this rule—they are original and make refreshingly bold claims. The articles are devoted to the reception of Aristotle’s logic and metaphysics in the Middle Ages and show the vitality of the cluster of scholars known as the “Copenhagen School of Medieval Philosophy.” Even though (...)
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  53.  25
    Ryle, the Double Counting Problem, and the Logical Form of Category Mistakes.Jonah Goldwater - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):337-359.
    Gilbert Ryle is most famous for accusing the Cartesian dualist of committing a category mistake. Yet the nature of this accusation, and the idea of a category mistake more generally, remains woefully misunderstood. The aim of this paper is to rectify this misunderstanding. I show that Ryle does not conceive of category mistakes as mistakes of predication, as is so widely believed. Instead I show category mistakes are mistakes of conjunction and quantification. This thesis uniquely unifies and explains the wide (...)
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  54.  11
    Aristotelismo by Enrico Berti.Roberto Granieri & Lloyd P. Gerson - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):363-364.
    At the beginning of his 1952 monograph on Aristotle, D. J. Allan wrote, “it is not the purpose of this work to trace the influence of Aristotle upon subsequent science and philosophy, an important and interesting subject which would require a volume to itself.” The volume Allan gave up writing has just been published by Enrico Berti. Aristotelismo does not aim at providing a history of Aristotelianism, as the title might suggest. Rather, it is a collection of some of the (...)
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  55.  4
    Justice as a Virtue: A Thomistic Perspective by Jean Porter.Jeffrey Hause - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):366-367.
    Jean Porter’s excellent study not only offers a clear and expansive picture of Aquinas on justice but also touches on nearly every other topic in Aquinas’s ethics. Of course, Aquinas himself thinks that no topic in philosophy or theology can be understood, or understood well, apart from its connection to multiple others, and Porter’s book is in this respect, as in so many others, deeply Thomistic. In the course of exploring justice—justice as a virtue, justice as a moral ideal, and (...)
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  56.  5
    The First German Philosopher: The Mysticism of Jakob Böhme as Interpreted by Hegel by Cecilia Muratori.Douglas Hedley - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):369-370.
    Cecilia Muratori’s book is a major contribution to scholarship on the Romantic Age and idealistic philosophy. Jakob Böhme is a thinker of great importance within the German tradition, but is so dense and difficult that he is very hard to study without proper and expert guidance. Muratori has exceeded expectations in her lucid, imaginative, and brilliant exposition of Böhme’s thought in relation to Hegel and, indeed, the modern age. Hegel not only regarded Böhme as a writer of philosophical genius, but (...)
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  57.  19
    On the Separability and Inseparability of the Stoic Principles.Ian Hensley - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):187-214.
    Sources for Stoicism present conflicting accounts of the Stoic principles. Some suggest that the principles are inseparable from each other. Others suggest that they are separable. To resolve this apparent interpretive dilemma, I distinguish between the functions of the principles and the bodies that realize those functions. Although the principles cannot separate when realizing their roles, the Stoic theory of blending entails that the bodies that realize those roles are physically separable. I present a strategy for further work on the (...)
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  58.  6
    Grotius on Property and the Right of Necessity.Dennis Klimchuk - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):239-260.
    i would hazard to guess that nearly everyone would agree that In situations of peril, it is permissible to use another’s property without her permission if that is the only way to save oneself from serious harm.1But that If one damages or consumes that property, one ought to compensate its owner.It turns out, however, that the conjunction of N1 and N2 is surprisingly difficult to justify. That is because if you accept N1, you are also likely to accept A property (...)
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  59.  8
    The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship That Shaped Modern Thought by Dennis C. Rasmussen. [REVIEW]Lauren Kopajtic - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):376-377.
    The philosophical friendship between David Hume and Adam Smith spanned almost thirty years and influenced several of the greatest productions of the Scottish Enlightenment, but it has never before been the subject of a book-length study. Rasmussen’s accessible account of the friendship between Hume and Smith remedies this and tells an engaging story about these two “dearest” friends.Rasmussen’s story unfolds chronologically, with each chapter focusing largely on either Hume or Smith. The major events of their friendship are dutifully covered, including (...)
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  60.  6
    Socrates and Alcibiades: Plato’s Drama of Political Ambition and Philosophy by Ariel Helfer.Annie Larivée - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):361-362.
    Helfer opens his book with a series of vigorous reflections that have the virtue of challenging some of the reader’s deeply seated beliefs concerning political emotions. While we moderns see political ambition mostly as a threat to the public good that needs to be checked, ancients, the author suggests, considered that passion in a positive light. Indeed, they regarded political ambition as the manifestation of a powerful desire to achieve noble deeds in the civic sphere, an aspiration they saw as (...)
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  61.  4
    Truth in Husserl, Heidegger, and the Frankfurt School: Critical Retrieval by Lambert Zuidervaart.Christian Lotz - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):379-380.
    In his new book, Lambert Zuidervaart argues that the concept of propositional truth remains one-dimensional and needs to be extended by and embedded in several versions of what the author calls “existential truth,” which he discusses in relation to phenomenology and critical theory. Zuidervaart focuses on key figures of twentieth-century German philosophy, such as Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Theodor Adorno, Jürgen Habermas, and Max Horkheimer. According to the author, his book “does not intend to be a historical narrative” ; nor (...)
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  62.  2
    Wagering on an Ironic God: Pascal on Faith and Philosophy by Thomas S. Hibbs.Graham Oppy - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):372-373.
    Infini-rien—Blaise Pascal’s wager fragment —is fraught with interpretative difficulties. Reconstruction of the text from the original manuscript is controversial. Interpretation of the reconstructed text is doubly controversial. Location of the text within the wider frame of the Pensées is problematic. Interpretation of the text within the wider frame of the Pensées is doubly problematic.The title of the work under review, which also serves as the title for the work’s major chapter, suggests that infini-rien is a central focus. The title of (...)
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  63.  2
    Does History Make Sense? Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice by Terry Pinkard.Paul Redding - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):378-379.
    Terry Pinkard has been a leading figure within the revival of Hegelian philosophy over the last quarter century, together with Robert Pippin articulating an innovative and influential interpretation of Hegel as the rightful successor to Kant’s distinctly modern critique of “dogmatic metaphysics.” In Does History Make Sense?, he attempts the challenging task of rescuing Hegel’s philosophy of history, drawing on his earlier account of Hegel as a kind of “modified Aristotelian naturalist,” here sketched in chapter 1. Given that the picture (...)
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  64.  2
    Spinoza’s Ethics: A Critical Guide Ed. By Yitzhak Y. Melamed.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):373-374.
    This new Cambridge Critical Guide to Spinoza’s Ethics offers an extensive, thought-provoking, and up-to-date state of the scholarly conversation that surrounds one of Spinoza’s most studied masterpieces. The first six chapters address topics mostly related to parts one and two of the Ethics. Don Garrett discusses the identity of the attributes. Warren Zev Harvey suggests that Maimonides’s critique of final causes can be considered as an important source for Spinoza’s treatment of the same topic in the appendix to part one. (...)
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  65.  8
    Augustine’s Development on Testimonial Knowledge.Matthew Kent Siebert - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):215-237.
    “eyes are surer witnesses than ears,” says Heraclitus, deploying the term ‘witnesses’ metaphorically to steer us toward what we can see for ourselves, and away from depending literally on the witness of others.1 Much ancient epistemology leans the same way. The tendency from pre-Socratic times on is to distinguish between doxa and epistêmê, and to say that ordinary human testimony on its own can give us no more than doxa.2 Some ancient philosophers have what we might call ‘rationalist’ reasons for (...)
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  66.  7
    Toleration and Understanding in Locke by Nicholas Jolley.Julie Walsh - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):374-375.
    Jolley argues that paying close attention to Locke’s Epistola de Tolerentia, as well as the later letters on toleration occasioned by Jonas Proast’s response to the Epistola, reveals that “a different Locke emerges from the one who is familiar to us today; it is a Locke who is more single-mindedly devoted to the project of promoting the cause of religious toleration than has been realized”. Jolley argues that Locke is a more systematic thinker than we think, and that the theme (...)
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  67.  12
    Kant and the Laws of Nature Ed. By Michela Massimi, Angela Breitenbach.Reed Winegar - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):377-378.
    This is a welcome collection of essays addressing Kant’s treatment of natural laws. Kant’s best-known discussion of natural laws is the Critique of Pure Reason’s second analogy, which argues that all alterations take place according to causal laws. But Kant’s overall treatment of natural laws extends far beyond the second analogy. For instance, the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science aims to derive specific laws of motion. The appendix to the Critique of Pure Reason’s transcendental dialectic and the introductions to the (...)
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  68.  7
    Eighteenth-Century Dissent and Cambridge Platonism: Reconceiving the Philosophy of Religion by Louise Hickman.Martha K. Zebrowski - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (2):371-372.
    Plato and Platonism held a significant place in British intellectual inquiry in the eighteenth century. Louise Hickman enters this largely unexplored territory with a valuable study of select elements in the theological and political arguments of certain British divines. She is particularly concerned to expose the limitations of familiar and narrowly-rational arguments that in the eighteenth century supported natural religion and theology, and to bring to the fore a countervailing rational theology that discovers in and for the human mind the (...)
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  69.  18
    Kant's Theory of Normativity: Exploring the Space of Reason by Konstantin Pollok. [REVIEW]Matthew C. Altman - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):177-178.
    Konstantin Pollok's ambitious aim in this book is to formulate a unified theory of normativity that runs throughout Kant's three Critiques. Specifically, he argues that, on Kant's view, synthetic a priori principles structure "the space of reason" and determine the validity of our judgments. Such principles are constitutive of our epistemological, ethical, and aesthetic practices by setting the conditions for what makes a meaningful judgment in those areas, but they are also normative in that the particular judgments we make can (...)
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  70.  15
    Autonomy, Negativity, and the Challenge of Spinozism in Hegel's Science of Logic.Brady Bowman - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):101-126.
    Hegel's project of elaborating a "speculative logic" is representative of a distinctively post-Kantian trend.2 Hegel shares his like-minded contemporaries' critical assessment that Kant had failed to offer a proper deduction of the cornerstone of his philosophical edifice, the so-called 'categories' or 'pure concepts of the understanding'.3 Kant does of course offer what he calls a deduction of the categories, namely, an argument for his claim that, in cognizing the matter passively given to it in sensibility, the finite subject's activity necessarily (...)
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  71.  18
    Avicenna's Healing and the Metaphysics of Truth.Daniel D. De Haan - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):17-44.
    In this study, I expound Avicenna's doctrine of truth as it is presented in his Metaphysics of the Healing. My aim is to establish two theses. First, that Avicenna has a rich and systematic metaphysical doctrine of truth that is worked out within the epistemological, ontological, aitiological, and theological investigations of the Ilāhiyyāt. Second, that his doctrine of truth draws upon the accounts of truth he found in his predecessors, and that he amplifies these accounts in light of his own (...)
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  72.  1
    Lexique Historique de la Langue Scientifique Arabe Ed. By Roshdi Rashed.Thérèse-Anne Druart - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):174-174.
    This beautifully laid out dictionary will be very useful to anyone seriously interested in Arabic philosophy. Philosophers in Islamic lands often wrote classifications of the sciences or used examples taken from various scientific disciplines, particularly mathematics, that can be somewhat puzzling for scholars in philosophy. For instance, in his autobiography, Avicenna tells us that his father sent him to a vegetable seller to study Indian calculation. I always wondered what exactly Indian calculation was and finally found the answer to this (...)
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  73.  1
    Biography, Historiography, and Modes of Philosophizing Ed. By Patrick Baker.Sabrina Ebbersmeyer - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):176-177.
    How do we write history of philosophy? What models and methods do we use when engaging with the philosophical past and where did they come from? One influential mode of writing history of philosophy is the biographical account, found famously in Diogenes Laertius's De Vita et Moribus Philosophorum. The impact of Diogenes Laertius, especially during the early modern period, is clearly documented by the volume under review. However, this volume is not dedicated to biographical writing on philosophers exclusively, but to (...)
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  74.  19
    What Did Glaucon Draw?: A Diagrammatic Proof for Plato's Divided Line.Terry Echterling - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):1-15.
    Elaborating the analogy between the sun and the good, Plato's Socrates tells Glaucon to divide a line αβ into two unequal segments at γ. The result is that αγ represents what is intelligible and γβ what is visible.1 Then Glaucon is to divide each of the two segments by the same ratio as he used in the original division.2 Whatever proportion he used to make the cuts γ, δ, and ε in the divided line, generating its four segments, the geometrical (...)
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  75.  7
    Weltschmerz: Pessimism in German Philosophy, 1860–1900 by Frederick C. Beiser.Patrick R. Frierson - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):180-181.
    Frederick Beiser continues to unfold the German philosophical tradition, refusing to let a static and narrowly construed canon of "big names" obscure important philosophical debates in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Germany. Weltschmerz focuses on the pessimism controversy, the debate over "the thesis that life is not worth living, that nothingness is better than being, or that it is worse to be than not be".The most important philosopher in the book is Arthur Schopenhauer. Chapters 1–4 are devoted to Schopenhauer's legacy, metaphysics, pessimism, (...)
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  76.  17
    Plato by Constance Meinwald.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):170-171.
    All those who profess ancient philosophy will no doubt have received from students requests for a reliable introductory monograph on Plato. It is a request that many—myself included—find somewhat embarrassing. For it is extremely difficult to think of an introductory book on Plato in English that is at once accessible to beginners, reasonably comprehensive, exegetically accurate, and philosophically sophisticated. But if these four desiderata are not met, any recommendation may actually do more harm than good. It is not difficult to (...)
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  77.  16
    Solipsism and the Self in Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Cameron Hessell - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):127-154.
    This paper aims to settle the question of what Ludwig Wittgenstein meant by "what solipsism means": This remark provides the key to the problem, how much truth there is in solipsism. For what solipsism means is quite correct; only it cannot be said, but makes itself manifest. The world is my world: this is manifest in the fact that the limits of language mean the limits of my world. 1 Throughout this paper, I will paraphrase "what solipsism means" simply as (...)
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  78.  7
    Meaning and Mortality in Kierkegaard and Heidegger: Origins of the Existential Philosophy of Death by Adam Buben.Susan-Judith Hoffmann - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):181-182.
    Buben undertakes the ambitious project of providing "a compelling framework for understanding the ways in which philosophy has discussed death". This is a tall order for 136 pages of text, all the more so since he argues that the thinkers of western philosophy before Kierkegaard's and Heidegger's innovative existential philosophy of death can be broadly categorized into a Platonic strain, and an Epicurean strain. The Platonic strain suggests that death should not be feared, as the soul will survive the death (...)
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  79.  1
    Plato's Atlantis Story: Text, Translation and Commentary by Christopher Gill.Charles Ives - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):171-172.
    Plato's Atlantis Story is a revised edition of Gill's previous volume, Plato: The Atlantis Story, originally published by Bristol Press in 1980. This revised edition includes a new interpretive introduction, comprehensive bibliography, an original translation, Greek text with commentary, a glossary of Greek terms, an index of ancient passages, and a handful of helpful figures that portray the geography of Atlantis as well as the geography of the world as conceived by the Greeks. All the bases have certainly been covered, (...)
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  80.  8
    Giving a Damn: Essays in Dialogue with John Haugeland Ed. By Zed Adams and Jacob Browning.Apaar Kumar - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):182-184.
    The analytically rigorous essays in this volume celebrate the innovative thought of John Haugeland by locating, critiquing, and extending it. Divided thematically into four parts, the volume begins with essays concerning Haugeland's Heidegger interpretation, followed by sections relating to his views on embodiment and intentionality. The final part contains Haugeland's unfinished and hitherto unpublished "Two Dogmas of Rationalism," responses to this essay, and an interpretation of Kant's transcendental deduction of the categories that Haugeland drafted based on a reading group including (...)
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  81.  7
    Logical Normativity and Rational Agency—Reassessing Locke's Relation to Logic.Huaping Lu-Adler - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):75-99.
    There is an exegetical quandary when it comes to interpreting Locke's relation to logic.On the one hand, over the last few decades a substantive amount of literature has been dedicated to explaining Locke's crucial role in the development of a new logic in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. John Yolton names this new logic the "logic of ideas," while James Buickerood calls it "facultative logic."1 Either way, Locke's Essay is supposedly its "most outspoken specimen" or "culmination."2 Call this reading the (...)
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  82.  12
    A New Perspective on Antisthenes: Logos, Predicate and Ethics in His Philosophy by P. A. Meijer. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):169-170.
    Antisthenes of Athens was a contemporary follower of Socrates who wrote prolifically on topics ranging from semantics to ethics to Homeric criticism. He was also a fierce rival of Plato and, in our ancient sources, his austere ethical views are sometimes presented as an inspiration for the Cynic and Stoic schools of philosophy. Evidently, Antisthenes was a major figure in antiquity, but we have only second-hand reports of his philosophical life and legacy. The most prominent modern scholarship on Antisthenes is (...)
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  83.  9
    The Happiness Philosophers: The Lives and Works of the Great Utilitarians by Bart Schultz.Tim Mulgan - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):179-180.
    Bart Schultz's fascinating study weaves together the lives and works of the four founders of classical utilitarianism—William Godwin, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, and Henry Sidgwick—challenging historical interpretations and opening exciting new possibilities for contemporary moral and political philosophy. Schultz reminds us that the founders of utilitarianism were not lifeless proponents of a simplistic theory, but rounded individuals in whose hands the utilitarian project ranged widely over acts, rules, institutions, political economy, politics, law, and much else. Anyone interested in the (...)
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  84.  11
    Aliquid Remanet: What Are We to Do with Spinoza's Compendium of Hebrew Grammar?Steven Nadler - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):155-167.
    Good things come to those who wait. In this case, the waiting period was just a bit shy of the amount of time that the ancient Israelites had to spend in the desert before entering the Promised Land. But now, over thirty years after the appearance of the first volume of Edwin Curley's English edition of the "collected works" of Spinoza—and almost fifty years since the signing of the original contract with Princeton University Press—we have been magnificently rewarded. Volume 2 (...)
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  85.  9
    Descartes, Malebranche, and the Crisis of Perception by Walter Ott.Steven Nadler - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):175-176.
    This is a short book on a small topic with big ramifications. I call it a small topic because Descartes's account of perception occupies only a corner of his overall philosophical project, which is dominated by his concern to provide a solid metaphysical and epistemological grounding for his science. At the same time, Ott's discussion of sense perception in Descartes comes part and parcel with an account of the theory of ideas in Descartes and later Cartesians, a theory of how (...)
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  86.  7
    Hume at La Flèche: Skepticism and the French Connection.Dario Perinetti - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):45-74.
    In "My Own Life," Hume writes:1 During my retreat in France, first at Reims, but chiefly at La Fleche, in Anjou, I composed my Treatise of Human Nature. After passing three years very agreeably in that country, I came over to London in 1737. In the end of 1738, I published my Treatise, and immediately went down to my mother and my brother, who lived at his country house, and was employing himself very judiciously and successfully in the improvement of (...)
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  87.  9
    Plato and Plotinus on Mysticism, Epistemology, and Ethics by David J. Yount.Svetla Slaveva-Griffin - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):172-173.
    This book is Yount's second installment in the Bloomsbury Studies in Ancient Philosophy. It comes on the heels of his debut in the series with Plotinus the Platonist: A Comparative Account of Plato and Plotinus' Metaphysics. The titles of both works clearly indicate what is close to Yount's heart; and he delivers, here as well as previously, the same passionate defense that there is an essentially inseparable connection between the philosophies of Plato and Plotinus. This stance may come as a (...)
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