Year:

  1.  2
    The A Priori Thought of Descartes: Cognition, Method and Science by Jan Palkoska.Delphine Antoine-Mahut - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):731-732.
    Resituating Descartes in any historical framework allows one to show how a radical philosophy was built against, but also along with, current and past doctrines. Taking seriously this intellectual struggle is worthwhile. But genetic analysis of the Cartesian corpus presents a real challenge. One pragmatic way of doing it is to begin with lexical clarification as proposed by Palkoska. His aim is to understand Descartes's conception of scientia, and to explain how cognition produces certain and evident true judgments. The main (...)
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  2.  20
    De Gravitatione Reconsidered: The Changing Significance of Experimental Evidence for Newton's Metaphysics of Space.Zvi Biener - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):583-608.
    newton's commitment to absolute space—the immobile, eternal arena in which all things exist—is well known.1 Before 1962, it was studied through three main sources: the scholium to the definitions of the Principia, the General Scholium, and the Leibniz-Clarke correspondence. Other historical evidence was scarce.2 In 1962, A. Rupert Hall and Marie Boas Hall published a previously unknown Newtonian manuscript they titled by its incipit De Gravitatione et aequipondio fluidorum et solidorum in fluidis.3 The work begins as a synthetic treatment of (...)
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  3.  1
    L'Esprit du Corps: La Doctrine Pascalienne de L'Amour by Alberto Frigo.Daniel Collette - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):730-731.
    The goal of this text is to give an exposition of Pascal's ethics, treatments of which are still rare and mostly outdated. Although the past few years have seen several new book-length works on various aspects of Pascal's philosophy, Frigo's monograph stands out for not merely perpetuating dated readings, but instead advancing the discussion with unprecedented historical research and drawing from recent developments.The general focus of the book is to uncover Pascal's moral philosophy by means of the Morale chrétienne fragments (...)
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  4.  3
    Hume on the Stoic Rational Passions and "Original Existences".Jason R. Fisette - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):609-639.
    I argue that Hume’s characterization of the passions as “original existences” is shaped by his preoccupation with Stoicism, and is not (as most commentators suppose) a ridiculous or trifling remark. My argument has three parts. First, I show that Hume’s description of the passions as “original existences” is properly understood as part of his argument against the possibility of passions caused by reason alone (rational passions). Second, I establish that Hume was responding to the Stoics, who claimed that a rational (...)
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  5. The Life of Reason or the Phases of Human Progress: Reason in Science by George Santayana.C. Flamm Matthew - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):742-743.
    The publication of the critical edition of Reason in Science marks a moment of significant progress in The Works of George Santayana project of The MIT Press, a project nearing its thirtieth year. The book series from which RS is derived, The Life of Reason, is the most important philosophic work of Santayana's early career, and indeed is of essential importance for anyone interested in early twentieth-century American philosophy. As James Gouinlock puts it in his introduction, LR "proved to be (...)
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  6.  2
    Early Modern Cartesianisms: Dutch and French Constructions by Tad M. Schmaltz.Daniel Garber - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):732-734.
    It is difficult to overestimate the influence of Descartes on his contemporaries and following generations. While still alive he had followers and detractors, and after his death, numerous books and pamphlets, with his name prominently featured in their titles, adopted and developed his ideas, twisted them to fit into a wide variety of intellectual agendas, or argued passionately against them. While he may not deserve the title of father of modern philosophy, in many circles he was considered the iconic modern (...)
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  7.  2
    Hegel on the Proofs and Personhood of God: Studies in Hegel's Logic and Philosophy of Religion by Robert R. Williams.Kevin J. Harrelson - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):739-740.
    Hegel endorsed proofs of the existence of God, and also believed God to be a person. Some of his interpreters ignore these apparently retrograde tendencies, shunning them in favor of the philosopher's more forward-looking contributions. Others embrace Hegel's religious thought, but attempt to recast his views as less reactionary than they appear to be. Robert Williams's latest monograph belongs to a third category: he argues that Hegel's positions in philosophical theology are central to his philosophy writ large. The book is (...)
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  8.  1
    Early Modern Philosophers and the Renaissance Legacy Ed. By Cecilia Muratori, and Gianni Paganini.Helen Hattab - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):736-737.
    Early Modern Philosophers and the Renaissance Legacy is one of several volumes published in this decade that reflect a revival of interest in Renaissance philosophy. As a welcome corrective to the common practice of establishing continuities between the two periods by emphasizing how Renaissance philosophies anticipate modern ones, this volume aims to "shift the weight from the problem of assessing the 'modernity' of Renaissance philosophers to the creation of a space of interaction between Renaissance and early modern thinkers in the (...)
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  9.  2
    De l'Imagination À L'Entendement: La Puissance du Langage Chez Spinoza by Céline Hervet.Graeme Hunter - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):734-735.
    Stuart Hampshire's Spinoza depicts Spinoza as having tried to free language from its intimate association with the imagination in order to enable it to convey the clear and distinct ideas of true philosophy. The inaccuracy and insufficiency of this account was pointed out by David Savan in an article in the Philosophical Review in 1958. Savan showed that concerns about language were more deeply and widely woven into Spinoza's thought than Hampshire had noticed; and he argued that, for Spinoza, understanding (...)
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  10.  4
    Radical Evil As A Regulative Idea.Markus Kohl - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):641-673.
    Kant's doctrine of the radical evil in human nature invites at least two serious worries: first, it is unclear how Kant could establish the claim that all human beings adopt an evil maxim; second, this claim seems to conflict with central features of Kant's doctrine of freedom. I argue, via criticisms of various charitable interpretations, that these problems are indeed insuperable if we read Kant as trying to establish that all human beings are evil as a matter of fact. I (...)
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  11.  2
    Merleau-Ponty on Style as the Key to Perceptual Presence and Constancy.Samantha Matherne - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):693-727.
    in recent discussions of two important issues in the philosophy of perception, viz. the problem of perceptual presence and the problem of perceptual constancy, Maurice Merleau-Ponty's ideas have received something of a second life thanks to the work of Sean Kelly and Alva Noë.1 The problem of perceptual presence stems from questions related to how it is possible for us to perceive features of objects that are not directly given to our embodied point of view, for example, in amodal perception (...)
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  12.  4
    Leibniz on Compossibility and Possible Worlds Eds. By Gregory Brown and Yual Chiek.Mills Jacob - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):735-736.
    This collection brings together nine essays addressing the problem of compossibility in Leibniz's system of thought. The problem of compossibility is that of determining by what mechanism two independently possible substances are jointly possible, and thus do form part of the same possible world. The collection opens with an excellent introduction to the terrain, reviews established approaches to the problem, and will be extremely helpful to both those new to, and those familiar with, Leibniz.Adam Harmer's essay provides a detailed analysis (...)
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  13.  4
    Irony and Idealism: Rereading Schlegel, Hegel, and Kierkegaard by Fred Rush.Nathan Ross - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):741-742.
    The founder of early German Romantic philosophy, Friedrich Schlegel, is a pivotal figure in the history of philosophy because of the way that he establishes many of the themes by which nineteenth-century continental thought separates itself from Kant. Yet our view of his depth and originality as a thinker has often been distorted by his proximity to Hegel, who propounded a highly polemical and reductive reading of Schlegel. One of the ways in which our view of Schlegel is distorted by (...)
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  14.  2
    Wilfrid Sellars and the Foundations of Normativity by Peter Ole.A. Rottschaefer William - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):745-746.
    In this very informative volume, Peter Olen addresses questions that are of interest both to philosophers generally and to students of Sellars's thought in particular. Do philosophers have a job that is distinct from the scientists'? Yes. What is the nature of normativity and how is it discerned? Roughly, normativity is connected with the extra-conceptual content that normative language adds to factual content. Do Wilfrid Sellars's career-long efforts to account for the nature of both philosophy and normativity present itself as (...)
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  15.  4
    The Dutch Legacy: Radical Thinkers of the 17 Th Century and the Enlightenment Ed. By Sonja Lavaert and Winfried Schröder.Sharp Hasana - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):737-738.
    Scholars of the seventeenth century, the Enlightenment, and Benedict de Spinoza will profit from the essays collected in The Dutch Legacy. Considered as a whole, the volume makes at least two significant contributions. First, it puts firmly to rest the still prevalent idea that Spinoza was a fundamentally lonely thinker whose ideas were sui generis, sprung from the mind of a solitary genius living in social, political, and spiritual exile. Despite the fact that Spinoza's correspondence testifies to a rich network (...)
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  16.  7
    Adorno's Theory of Philosophical and Aesthetic Truth by Owen Hulatt.Martin Shuster - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):743-744.
    Owen Hulatt has written an exceptional book. As truth takes a beating at the hands of late capitalism, Theodor W. Adorno's assessment of the modern world and of truth becomes intimately relevant. There is a lot to recommend in this book, and it is a bold contribution to understanding Adorno.Following Adorno, Hulatt suggests that there is a connection between epistemology and aesthetics, that the objects of both admit of being true. As he puts it, "art is itself a kind of (...)
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  17.  3
    Solving the Regress Puzzle: J. F. Fries's Psychological Reconstruction of Kant's Transcendental Methodology.Peter Sperber - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):675-691.
    while kant's transcendental philosophy as expounded in the Critique of Pure Reason and the Prolegomena has been extraordinarily influential over the past two centuries, its transcendental methodology has continued to puzzle commentators. Recently, Colin Marshall, in an article entitled "Does Kant Demand Explanations for All Synthetic A Priori Claims?," has brought one of the central problems for any interpretation of Kant's methodology to the fore again.1 In his paper, Marshall discusses what he calls "the Regress Puzzle": Several commentators have noted (...)
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  18.  3
    Individuals as Universals: Audacious Views in Early Twelfth-Century Realism.Tarlazzi Caterina - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):557-581.
    much can be said about what the early twelfth-century debate on universals is not. For instance, it is not a discussion of which genera or species grasp the truth of things, or which genera or species a certain individual belongs to, or how one knows that this is so. Twelfth-century magistri thought that the genera and species for which nouns are found in ordinary language, such as 'animal' or 'man,' "cut the world at its joints." They considered it unproblematic both (...)
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  19. Quaestiones Super Priora Analytica Aristotelis by Radulphus Brito.Paul Thom - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):729-730.
    This volume should be warmly welcomed as the first critical edition of a major work by Radulphus Brito, one of the most important logicians of the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries, who lectured at the University of Paris between 1296 and 1306. The questions edited here cover most of Aristotle's Prior Analytics, with 75 questions on the first book and 22 on the second. There are no questions specifically on book 1, chapters 17–22, and none on book 2, chapters (...)
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  20.  2
    Hegel on Philosophy in History Ed. By Rachel Zuckert and James Kreines.Yeomans Christopher - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):740-741.
    Hegel on Philosophy in History is a Festschrift for Robert Pippin, one of the most important contemporary Hegel scholars. Pippin's importance has to do not only with the way in which he opened up the field of Hegel studies beginning in the 1980s, but also with the extraordinary number of other figures and discussions in philosophy with which he has brought Hegel's thought into connection. These aspects of Pippin's importance are connected, of course, since it is the latter that allowed (...)
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  21.  1
    Julius Caesar Scaliger, Renaissance Reformer of Aristotelianism: A Study of His Exotericae Exercitationes by Kuni Sakamoto.Andreas Blank - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):543-544.
    Julius Caesar Scaliger was a natural philosopher and literary theorist whose work was widely discussed throughout the second half of the sixteenth and the first half of the seventeenth centuries. After this period, it fell into oblivion, only to be rediscovered during the last three decades or so. His natural philosophy has triggered a series of specialized studies on particular aspects of his thought, especially those aspects that were influential in the development of early modern corpuscularianism. Sakamoto's book goes considerably (...)
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  22.  3
    Locke on Personal Identity: A Response to the Problems of His Predecessors.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):407-434.
    john locke argues that personal identity consists in sameness of consciousness, and he maintains that any other theory of personal identity would lead to "great Absurdities".1 This statement intimates that Locke thought carefully about alternative conceptions of personal identity and their problems. In this paper, I argue that, by understanding Locke's account of personal identity in the context of metaphysical and religious debates of his time, especially debates concerning the afterlife and the state of the soul between death and resurrection, (...)
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  23.  1
    Adorno and Existence by Peter E. Gordon.Bowie Andrew - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):550-551.
    The Anglophone reception of the work of T. W. Adorno has yet to succeed in making him a major part of mainstream philosophical debate. Among the reasons for this are the refusal of too many analytic philosophers to consider alternative approaches to philosophy, and Adorno's writing style, which does not always offer direct points of access for other philosophical traditions. Things are also not helped by the fact that writers on Adorno can tend to adopt some of his mode of (...)
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  24.  5
    Aristotle and the Endoxic Method.Carlo Davia - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):383-405.
    sir arthur conan doyle could have written the Sherlock Holmes stories in a different way. Imagine that, in those stories, clients would come to 221B Baker Street, ask Holmes to help solve a crime, and recount to him all the witness testimony they were able to collect. After the clients left his office, Holmes would take a seat in his armchair, light his clay pipe, and take stock of all the inconsistencies in the testimony presented to him. With these difficulties (...)
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  25. Truth and Irony: Philosophical Meditations on Erasmus by Terence J. Martin.Erik De Bom - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):542-543.
    This is a remarkable book on an important theme, namely, knowing ourselves, which the author elaborates in three meditations. The first is devoted to the virtues and vices of the tongue, that is, the relationship between truth and deceit. It is in this chapter that irony, the central concept of the book, is most fully elaborated. The second has war as its central theme and deals first and foremost with the possibility of civilizing war. Is there any sanity in war? (...)
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  26.  1
    On Being and Cognition: Ordinatio by John Duns Scotus.Stephen D. Dumont - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):539-540.
    On Being and Cognition: Ordinatio 1.3 is a translation by John van den Bercken of John Duns Scotus's large and influential treatise on mind and knowledge contained in book 1, distinction 3, of his Ordinatio. This is the first English rendering of Scotus's important distinction that is both complete and made from the definitive Latin text. Scotus's Ordinatio is the revised and greatly expanded version of his Oxford lectures on Sentences of Peter Lombard. The Sentences of Lombard was itself a (...)
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  27.  1
    The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno's Paradox From Socrates to Sextus by Gail Fine.David Ebrey - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):537-538.
    In the first half of this book, Gail Fine provides a renewed defense of her reading of Meno's famous paradox; in the second, she provides novel accounts of how Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, and Sextus Empiricus responded to the paradox. For reasons of space, I focus on the first half, where Fine defends the same basic account of Meno's paradox she put forward in her influential "Inquiry in the Meno". The book goes further, considering and dismissing several alternatives not (...)
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  28.  3
    Levels of Argument: A Comparative Study of Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics by Dominic Scott.Jakob Leth Fink - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):538-539.
    The results of this comparison of the Republic and the Nicomachean Ethics can be summed up thusly: the texts share the same methodology, this methodology is based on a functional account of human nature, and whereas Plato believes that political philosophy needs grounding in metaphysics, Aristotle considers such a thing possible but superfluous.I shall here focus on exclusively. The shared methodology is characterized by two Platonic similes: the cave from the Republic, and the racecourse simile that Aristotle attributes to Plato (...)
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  29.  1
    A Kantian Disagreement Between Father and Son: Roy Wood Sellars and Wilfrid Sellars on the Categories.Fabio Gironi - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):513-536.
    that wilfrid sellars was a more subtle and sophisticated philosopher than his father, Roy Wood Sellars, is, I believe, a rather uncontroversial assessment, one which, with fatherly pride, Roy1 would most probably have endorsed. Even considering the radical shift in philosophical methods and attitude which took place in the United States in the decades of Wilfrid's philosophically formative years, Wilfrid's unrelenting philosophical acumen and imagination, his unflinching resolve to doggedly pursue a problem on a variety of fronts at once (arguably (...)
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  30.  16
    The Bounds of Sense and the Limits of Analysis.Paul Guyer - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):365-382.
    this paper was written to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of The Bounds of Sense by Peter Strawson, in 1966. My own engagement with Kant's Critique of Pure Reason began a few months later, with a course in the spring semester of 1967 taught by Robert Nozick. The Critique had not been regularly taught at Harvard since the retirement of C. I. Lewis a dozen years before, and Nozick, then a twenty-eight-year-old assistant professor, started the course disarmingly by (...)
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  31. Nietzsche's Earth: Great Events, Great Politics by Gary Shapiro.Lawrence J. Hatab - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):549-550.
    In Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra, a central teaching calls on humanity to be "true to the earth," to affirm "the meaning [Sinn] of the earth." Scholars commonly read this as a call to embrace natural life, countering any transcendent or life-denying doctrine in the tradition. While certainly an apt reading, Gary Shapiro's remarkable new book draws attention to and articulates the many ways in which Nietzsche celebrates the actual earthen characteristics of human habitats: the concrete places, locales, climates, and environments (...)
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  32.  2
    Bayle, Jurieu, and the Dictionnaire Historique Et Critique by Mara van der Lugt.Irwin Kristen - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):547-548.
    Scholars in history and philosophy know the extraordinary difficulty of producing original research that is simultaneously creative, well-documented, and methodologically rigorous. But this is exactly what Mara van der Lugt manages in her recent book, a comprehensive treatment of Pierre Bayle's magnum opus. Reading Bayle is not for the faint of heart; he is a complex thinker with a controversial legacy. Van der Lugt exhibits appropriate caution, and though other interpreters have professed similar caution, van der Lugt's methodological commitments necessitate (...)
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  33.  5
    The Will, the Will to Believe, and William James: An Ethics of Freedom as Self-Transformation.Colin Koopman - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):491-512.
    William James's writings on morality form a vexed collection. Most philosophers regard James as having contributed primarily to epistemology, metaphysics, and psychology, viewing his moral philosophy as secondary, derivative, and accordingly uninteresting for contemporary debates. Among James's writings on moral matters, surely the most infamous is "The Will to Believe." Often read as primarily a contribution to epistemology or philosophy of religion,1 a number of critics spanning well over one hundred years of readership argue that "The Will to Believe" attempts (...)
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  34.  14
    Restoring Kant's Conception of the Highest Good.Lawrence Pasternack - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):435-468.
    Since the publication of Andrews Reath's “Two Conceptions of the Highest Good in Kant” (Journal of the History of Philosophy 26:4 (1988)), most scholars have come to accept the view that Kant migrated away from an earlier “theological” version to one that is more “secular.” The purpose of this paper is to explore the roots of this interpretative trend, re-assess its merits, and then examine how the Highest Good is portrayed in Kant’s Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. As (...)
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  35.  1
    The Collected Works of Spinoza by Benedictus de Spinoza.Michael A. Rosenthal - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):545-546.
    Edwin Curley published the first volume of his translation of Spinoza's Collected Works more than thirty years ago. It was a landmark that signaled a renewed interest among English-speaking scholars in Spinoza's work. Now, the second volume has appeared, and it too is a monument to scholarship and promises to inspire new research in the field.It contains new translations of the Theological-Political Treatise and the Political Treatise, as well as the rest of the correspondence, letters 29–84. As in the first (...)
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  36.  3
    Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation Reconsidered Ed. By Daniel Breazeale and Tom Rockmore.F. Scott Scribner - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):548-549.
    Interpretation always takes place in the present tense. It is worth reminding ourselves of this, because few philosophical texts or treatises have suffered the rise and fall of the vagaries of their own contemporary Weltanschauung as Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation. Few texts in history have been simultaneously so overestimated and underestimated in their impact and importance as Fichte's Addresses; and therefore few texts can be said to be so misunderstood—and so need in of reassessment. This collection, Fichte's Addresses (...)
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  37. Nicholas of Amsterdam: Commentary on the Old Logic by Egbert P. Bos.Mary Sirridge - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):540-542.
    This is an edition of commentaries on Porphyry's Isagoge and Aristotle's Categories and On Interpretation attributed to Nicholas of Amsterdam, who taught as magister Erfordiensis at the University of Rostock. Nicholas's own position is what he calls "the position of the moderns", which in this instance means that he adopts and defends primarily the approach of John Buridan and Marsilius of Inghen, including their conceptualism. As Bos notes, Nicholas is thus a good source of information about how the works of (...)
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  38.  1
    The Influence of Abraham Cohen de Herrera's Kabbalah on Spinoza's Metaphysics by Miquel Beltràn.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):544-545.
    Addressing the alleged "great secrets" contained in Scripture, Spinoza wrote in the Theological Political Treatise : "I have also read, and for that matter, known personally, certain Kabbalistic triflers. I've never been able to be sufficiently amazed by their madness". Were these words Spinoza's only reference to the Kabbalah, we would hardly have any reason to believe that his attitude toward the Kabbalistic literature was anything but dismissive. However, in a 1675 letter to Henry Oldenburg, Spinoza stressed that he shared (...)
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  39.  2
    Perspectives Without Privileges: The Estates in Hegel's Political Philosophy.Christopher Yeomans - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):469-490.
    we do not wonder enough about the prominence Hegel gives to the estates in his ethical and political philosophy. Part of the reason we Hegelians, in particular, do not is surely the concern that doing so will render Hegel archaic or parochial, and thus condemn him to the kind of respectful neglect Montesquieu has suffered for similar reasons. In fact, it is often claimed that the German term for a society structured by the estates, die Ständegesellschaft, has a translation into (...)
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  40.  21
    Kant, The Actualist Principle, and The Fate of the Only Possible Proof.Uygar Abaci - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):261-291.
    one important product of kant's pre-critical metaphysics is the proof of God's existence that he presented in The Only Possible Argument of 1763.1 Kant's proof moves from what I will call here the 'actualist principle', every real possibility must be grounded in actuality, to the conclusion that there exists a unique necessary being, i.e. an ens realissimum, which grounds all real possibility. The pre-critical proof deserves interest in its own right, for not only does it have an intriguing logical structure, (...)
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  41.  9
    If We Stop Thinking About Berkeley's Problem of Continuity, Will It Still Exist?S. Seth Bordner - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):237-260.
    every beginning philosophy student learns that Berkeley denies the existence of matter and holds instead that the existence of sensible objects consists in being perceived.1 She also learns that Berkeley holds that sensible objects exist continuously, even when no finite mind perceives them, since God always perceives them.Berkeley seems to say so explicitly in the Third Dialogue: When I deny sensible things an existence out of the mind, I do not mean my mind in particular, but all minds. Now it (...)
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  42.  3
    Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy by Justin E. H. Smith.Bernard Boxill - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):350-351.
    Justin Smith's book, a sophisticated history of the scientific and philosophical debates on nature, human nature, and human difference in the last centuries, is an important contribution to the pressing task of understanding and remedying our seemingly intractable color prejudice, that "curious kink" of the "human mind," as W. E. B. DuBois put it in a passage Smith uses as an epigraph to his book. It reveals how kinds of people, notably races that appear to be natural kinds, "carved out (...)
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  43.  2
    Spinoza's Acquiescentia.Clare Carlisle - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):209-236.
    in part iv of the Ethics, Spinoza writes that "self-esteem [acquiescentia in se ipso] is really the highest thing we can hope for."1 He opposes this affect to both humility and repentance, which are integral to Christian virtue; he describes pride—for Augustine, the root of sin—as a kind of acquiescentia in se ipso. Of course, Spinoza's distinctive views about God were enough to draw the charge of atheism from many of his contemporaries. But one of these critics, Pierre Poiret, took (...)
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  44.  3
    Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory Ed. By Matthew J. Kisner and Andrew Youpa.J. Thomas Cook - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):352-353.
    In the introductory chapter to this collection, the editors point out that, until recently, most Anglophone Spinoza scholarship has been focused on the metaphysics and epistemology of the Ethics. But according to Kisner and Youpa, Spinoza thought that metaphysics and epistemology were significant chiefly because they are required for understanding the more important part of his project—the ethical doctrine developed in the last three parts of the work. Ethica was so-titled because it is a book about ethics.In recent years, the (...)
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  45.  1
    The Divine Method and the Disunity of Pleasure in the Philebus.Emily Fletcher - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):179-208.
    the philebus is a puzzling dialogue, both for the substantive views it puts forward,1 and for the unexpected twists and turns of the discussion. Commentators frequently complain about the dialogue's lack of unity, due to its many apparently unnecessary digressions and interruptions.2 The discussion of the so-called 'divine method' seems to be one of the worst offenders on this score, for it is described and exemplified at length, only to be set aside as unnecessary shortly afterwards.I argue that the divine (...)
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  46. Diritto E Teologia Alle Soglie Dell'età Moderna: Il Problema Della Potentia Dei Absoluta in Giordano Bruno by Massimiliano Traversino.Guido Giglioni - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):349-350.
    Let us imagine for a moment that God is a most accomplished cithara player who nevertheless is not playing because he does not have a cithara; in other words, he is someone who has all the skills to act in the most masterly manner, but refrains from acting due to a lack of material implements. As no bodily counterpart can match his active power, he finds himself in the awkward situation of not being able to express himself. This is the (...)
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  47.  2
    Naturalism and Realism in Kant's Ethics by Frederick Rauscher.Jeanine M. Grenberg - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):354-355.
    Making sense of how intelligible notions in Kant's moral philosophy make a place for themselves in the sensible, natural world is perhaps one of the greatest challenges to a Kantian moral philosopher. In this book, Rauscher takes on that question with great aplomb, by looking carefully at an impressive array of Kant's texts, and assessing the extent to which one can say Kant is a realist, or naturalist. Rauscher's intelligent and creative conclusion, in his words, is as follows: I have (...)
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  48.  1
    Scottish Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Vol. 1: Morals, Politics, Art, Religion Ed. By Aaron Garrett, and James A. Harris. [REVIEW]Grote Simon - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):357-358.
    Together with Scottish Philosophy in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, edited by Gordon Graham, this volume inaugurates the series A History of Scottish Philosophy, published by Oxford University Press under Graham's general editorship. A collection of "collaborative studies by expert authors," the series is projected to "provide a comprehensive account of the Scottish philosophical tradition". In their introduction to this particular volume, however, editors Aaron Garrett and James A. Harris propose a more modest purpose. "It will be plain to the (...)
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  49. Schopenhauer and Non-Cognitivist Moral Realism.Colin Marshall - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):293-316.
    schopenhauer has been ignored in contemporary metaethics, and his commentators rarely attempt to analyze his metaethical views in contemporary terms. This is unfortunate. Schopenhauer has something important to teach us about moral realism.1I have both philosophical and interpretive aims in this paper. My philosophical aim is to show how Schopenhauer's views challenge the contemporary understanding of moral realism. The challenge arises from the fact that, while Schopenhauer's view implies that morality is "real" in a metaphysically- and epistemologically-robust sense, that view (...)
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  50.  1
    L'essentialisme de Guillaume d'Ockham by Magali Roques.Jenny Pelletier - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):347-348.
    In this short but dense monograph, Roques sets out to fill a significant lacuna in the literature on William of Ockham's logic, epistemology, and metaphysics: his theory of real definitions. Remarkably, the subject has received little attention, given that nominal definitions, specifically in connection to complex connotative concepts in mental language and their role in Ockham's ontological reductionism, have been a central focus since the early 1980s. One reason for this oversight may be the historical association between real definitions and (...)
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  51.  5
    Form Without Matter: Empedocles and Aristotle on Color Perception by Mark Eli Kalderon.Gregory Salmieri - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):343-344.
    Kalderon describes his book as "an essay in the philosophy of perception written in the medium of historiography". It is an example of what has sometimes been called 'philosophical scholarship' or 'philosophical exegesis'—that is, scholarship on a historical thinker that is intended to bring to light a view of enduring philosophical significance and to commend it to the attention of contemporary philosophers working on the relevant issues. This is an especially challenging genre, and I do not think that Kalderon navigates (...)
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  52. Maimonides' Guide of the Perplexed: A Philosophical Guide by Alfred L. Ivry.Kenneth Seeskin - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):345-346.
    Although there has never been a shortage of book-length commentaries on Plato's Republic, Descartes's Meditations, or Spinoza's Ethics, the same cannot be said of Maimonides's Guide of the Perplexed. A few Hebrew commentaries exist, but they are neither influential nor readily accessible to English-speaking audiences. So while there has been a noticeable resurgence of interest in Maimonides since the publication of Shlomo Pines's English translation in 1963, there is still a respect in which Ivry's book breaks new ground.The reasons for (...)
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  53.  60
    Sellars and His Legacy Ed. By James R. O'Shea. [REVIEW]Niels Skovgaard-Olsen - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):358-359.
    Wilfred Sellars's deeply original and systematic thought continues to inspire into the twenty-first century. Part of the explanation must be that Sellars's struggle to integrate a Kantian-Wittgensteinian normative view of meaning and intentionality with a naturalistic outlook remains at the forefront of philosophical inquiry. To acknowledge the deep impact that Sellars has had on their work, a list of prominent, contemporary philosophers honor Sellars's legacy in a volume craftily edited by James R. O'Shea with a superb introduction. Like Sellars's own (...)
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  54.  7
    Articulating Medieval Logic by Terence Parsons. [REVIEW]Mark Thakkar - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):348-349.
    One of the founding myths of analytic philosophy is that the predicate logic developed in the late nineteenth century was far more powerful than its predecessors. This ambitious book argues that, on the contrary, medieval philosophers developed "a system of logic that is similar to the predicate calculus in richness and power" – or that, as Parsons put it in his presidential address to the American Philosophical Association, "the core of medieval logic is as accurate and as expressive as the (...)
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  55.  2
    The Political Writings. Volume 2: Political Regime and Summary of Plato's Laws by Alfarabi.Vallat Philippe - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):344-345.
    Butterworth here offers a perfectible translation of the Political Regime and a commendable, skilled rendition of the Summary of Plato's Laws. These two texts are published together and in this order because the contrast between their respective contents and methods would show that only in the last fourth of the first, as opposed to the whole of the second, "does Alfarabi consider political life as it usually is", that is, shorn of what Leo Strauss's disciples regard as metaphysical humbug. Metaphysics, (...)
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  56.  3
    Leibniz Et Bayle: Confrontation Et Dialogue Ed. By Christian Leduc, Paul Rateau, and Jean-Luc Solère.Mara van der Lugt - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):353-354.
    Central to this volume are two philosophical powerhouses of the early modern period: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Pierre Bayle. Born in, respectively, 1646 and 1647, both made for an astonishing career in a variety of scholarly disciplines and reached, if not equal, then certainly comparable fame in the course of their lives. Nowadays, Bayle's reputation is eclipsed by that of Leibniz, who is the focus of yearly conferences and libraries of scholarship, while Bayle had to await the later twentieth century (...)
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  57.  11
    Boarding Neurath's Boat: The Early Development of Quine's Naturalism.Sander Verhaegh - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):317-342.
    W. V. Quine is arguably the intellectual father of contemporary naturalism, the idea that there is no distinctively philosophical perspective on reality. Yet, even though Quine has always been a science-minded philosopher, he did not adopt a fully naturalistic perspective until the early 1950s. In this paper, I reconstruct the genesis of Quine’s ideas on the relation between science and philosophy. Scrutinizing his unpublished papers and notebooks, I examine Quine’s development in the first decades of his career. After identifying three (...)
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  58.  5
    Sittliches Bewusstsein Und Kategorischer Imperativ in Kants 'Grundlegung': Ein Kommentar Zum Dritten Abschnitt by Heiko Puls.Ware Owen - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):355-356.
    The third section of Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals is arguably one of the most challenging and obscure texts in the history of ethics. Until recently, it has also received comparatively little scholarly attention. Heiko Puls's line-by-line commentary is thus a welcome, and timely, addition to a growing wave of interest in this important work.The difficulty of Groundwork 3 arises largely because Kant is not entirely clear what he wants to accomplish by the end of the text. Some (...)
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  59.  4
    Review: Sittliches Bewusstsein Und Kategorischer Imperativ in Kants 'Grundlegung'. [REVIEW]Owen Ware - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):355-356.
    Heiko Puls's commentary is a welcome, and timely, addition to a growing wave of interest in the third section of Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals.
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  60.  11
    Kant's Modal Metaphysics by Nicholas F. Stang.Uygar Abaci - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):169-170.
    Nick Stang offers an extremely meticulous and original study of Immanuel Kant’s theory of modality. It is the first book dedicated solely to Kantian modality in the Anglophone Kant literature, crowning the recent surge of articles on the subject, while also setting up a fertile ground for further discussion. The book’s appeal is not limited to Kant readers. Considering its historical focus and scope, Stang’s book is unusually rigorous, analytically argued, and well informed by twentieth-century modal metaphysics and logic, making (...)
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  61.  13
    Hobbes on Mind: Practical Deliberation, Reasoning, and Language.Arash Abizadeh - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):1-34.
    it is widely known that thomas hobbes aspired to re-establish science, including the science of mind, will, and action, on a thoroughly materialist, mechanist, and determinist foundation.1 He found the view of human agency defended by late scholastics such as Francisco Suárez so nonsensical that he declared adherence to it “rightly... numbred amongst the many sorts of Madnesse.”2 On the “Mad” view of his scholastic predecessors, voluntary action arises from an incorporeal faculty, namely the will, which is free, self-determining, and (...)
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  62.  7
    Consciousness in Locke by Shelley Weinberg.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):164-165.
    Shelley Weinberg’s Consciousness in Locke builds on her previous journal articles and makes significant contributions to John Locke scholarship by offering the first systematic study of consciousness throughout Locke’s Essay. According to Weinberg, consciousness for Locke is self-referential, non-evaluative awareness internal to every thought or perception. She argues that once we realize the complexity of any perception—namely that every perception involves, “at the very least, an act of perception, an idea perceived, and consciousness ” —we can see that Locke’s conception (...)
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  63.  4
    Fichte's Ethical Thought by Allen W. Wood.A. Buchanan Caroline & Breazeale Daniel - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):170-171.
    Fichte’s Ethical Thought follows a format familiar to those who have read Allen Wood’s books on the ethical thought of Immanuel Kant and G. W. F. Hegel: Wood integrates Johann Gottlieb Fichte’s work into topical chapters, each discussing an important component of Fichte’s ethical system. The text he focuses on, of course, is Fichte’s 1798 System of Ethics, but Fichte scholars will likely be pleased to find that Wood discusses a wide range of Fichte’s Jena-era writings. Wood makes use of (...)
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  64.  38
    Kant on Cognition, Givenness, and Ignorance.Andrew Chignell - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):131-142.
    eric watkins and marcus willaschek provide a valuable service to people working on Kant’s epistemology and philosophy of mind by laying out a synoptic picture of Kant’s view of theoretical cognition. Their picture incorporates admirably clear accounts of the familiar building blocks of cognition—sensation, intuition, concept, and judgment—as well as some innovative interpretive theses of their own. Watkins and Willaschek’s basic claim is that, for Kant, theoretical cognition is “a mental state [or “representation”] that determines a given object by attributing (...)
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  65.  11
    De Anima by Aristotle.Klaus Corcilius - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):155-156.
    This is the overdue replacement of D. W. Hamlyn’s somewhat dismissive 1968 translation and commentary of the first two books of Aristotle’s De Anima. Hamlyn hardly did justice to this foundational treatise of Aristotle’s science of living beings: not only did he mistake it for a treatise on “the” philosophy of mind, he also did not bother to translate the first book apart from two snippets. Shields’s replacement is entirely free from such vices. It provides a new translation and commentary (...)
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  66.  3
    Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Text of Aristotle's Metaphysics by Mirjam E. Kotwick.Sten Ebbesen - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):159-160.
    This is not a book for the ordinary historian of philosophy. It consists almost exclusively of detailed analyses of the manuscript readings at a few scores of places in Metaphysics A–Δ and Λ, confronting the transmitted readings each time with Alexander of Aphrodisias’s comments on the relevant passage. The reason why only those books are studied is simple: Alexander’s commentary on books E–N was lost before the end of the Byzantine era, but Averroes preserved information about the contents of an (...)
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  67.  1
    Academic Skepticism in Seventeenth-Century French Philosophy: The Charronian Legacy 1601–1662 by José R. Maia Neto.Luiz Eva - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):163-164.
    Richard Popkin’s seminal study on the revival of skepticism from the late Renaissance onwards gave a prominent role to Pyrrhonism, rediscovered through the translation of Sextus Empiricus’s writings into Latin and their usage in Michel de Montaigne’s Essais, among other works. Maia Neto’s new book aims to reassess this interpretation, claiming that Montaigne’s disciple, Pierre Charron, in his La sagesse, displayed a distinctively Academic skeptical wisdom that became central in the philosophical debate of the period. Such wisdom, according to Maia (...)
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  68. Scottish Philosophy in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries Ed. By Gordon Graham.David Fergusson - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):174-175.
    The latest volume in the OUP History of Philosophy series comprises twelve essays, which provide in-depth study of a selection of philosophers who worked in the four ancient Scottish universities after 1800. Particular attention is dedicated to Thomas Brown, William Hamilton, James Frederick Ferrier, Alexander Bain, George Davie, and John Macmurray. Further chapters are devoted to the Scottish interpretation of Kant, idealism, and the international exporting of Scottish philosophy, especially its reception in American pragmatism. Introductory and concluding essays by the (...)
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  69.  2
    Hume's Sceptical Enlightenment by Ryu Susato.Peter S. Fosl - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):165-166.
    This rich and detailed volume reads David Hume as a skeptic, but Susato is less interested in dissecting Hume’s particular skeptical arguments and more concerned with what he regards as Hume’s larger skeptical vision as it relates to his social and political thought. Susato argues against the idea that Hume’s historical work is independent of his philosophical skepticism; and he opposes the idea that Hume ought best to be read as a conservative thinker. Broadly speaking, the question Susato addresses is (...)
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  70.  23
    Givenness, Objective Reality, and A Priori Intuitions.Stefanie Grüne - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):113-130.
    in kant’s account of cognition, Eric Watkins and Marcus Willaschek distinguish between a ‘broad’ and ‘narrow’ sense of Kant’s use of the term ‘cognition.’ Every “conscious representation that represents an object” counts as a cognition, taken in the broad sense.1 Every “conscious representation of a given object and of its general features” counts as a cognition in the narrow sense.2 In the case of finite beings, they argue, cognition in the narrow sense must fulfill two conditions: First, the object must (...)
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  71.  14
    Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato Ed. By Debra Nails and Harold Tarrant. [REVIEW]Verity Harte - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):154-155.
    Tradition has it that ‘deuteros plous’, an idiomatic expression used by Plato most famously at Phaedo 99c–d, refers to the use of oars to get to one’s destination in the absence of suitable wind for sailing. The nautical motif is a gesture towards the seafaring credentials of Holger Thesleff, the scholar to whom the volume pays tribute, the author, most notably for this occasion, of three books and several articles on the style, chronology and metaphysical outlook of Plato’s dialogues, now (...)
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  72.  7
    Hegel's Theory of Intelligibility by Rocío Zambrana.Stephen Houlgate - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):172-173.
    This is a rich and thought-provoking study of Hegel’s all-too-often neglected masterpiece, the Science of Logic. Zambrana draws on commentators, such as Robert Pippin, Robert Brandom and Karin de Boer, to construct a highly original and challenging interpretation of the Logic. Her principal thesis is that, for Hegel, our conceptions of nature, self, and society are not simply given to us but are the “product of reason”. More precisely, such conceptions, through which we render the world and ourselves intelligible, are (...)
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  73.  9
    The Trouble with Feelings, or Spinoza on the Identity of Power and Essence.Karolina Hübner - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):35-53.
    one of spinoza’s fundamental assumptions as a philosopher is that metaphysics provides necessary and sufficient foundations for psychological theory and moral philosophy. This is the assumption that gives the Ethics its basic architecture, as it moves from claims about substance to a catalogue of human emotions or ‘affects.’ As may be expected, given this assumption, at least some of the concepts that Spinoza first develops in the context of his metaphysics continue to do work in his discussions of psychology and (...)
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  74.  3
    Aristotle's Ethics and Medieval Philosophy: Moral Goodness and Practical Wisdom by Anthony Celano.Katja Krause - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):160-161.
    Celano’s book focuses on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and thirteenth-century scholastic appropriations of it. Its objectives are to unravel the inconsistencies in Aristotle’s accounts of eudaimonia, to establish the prominence of phronesis, and to reveal alterations of Aristotle’s phronesis in medieval moral thought. Celano’s textual analyses are laborious, and some features of his story may be considered stimulating insights. His construal of phronesis as primary to Aristotle’s moral conception, his emphasis on Albert’s contribution to medieval moral thought, and his inclusion of (...)
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  75.  5
    The Nietzschean Self: Moral Psychology, Agency, and the Unconscious by Paul Katsafanas.Karl Laderoute - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):173-174.
    In his new book, Paul Katsafanas aims to offer “a comprehensive account” of Nietzsche’s “analysis of the human self” in order to “uncover Nietzsche’s moral psychology”. The goal is admirable, and The Nietzschean Self has considerable merit. On the whole, it is well organized and clearly written, and some of the interpretive theses Katsafanas advocates present an intriguing countercurrent to some of the most popular views in contemporary Nietzsche scholarship. For example, Katsafanas argues that “Nietzsche does not deny the causal (...)
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  76.  3
    Plato on the Metaphysical Foundation of Meaning and Truth by Blake E. Hestir. [REVIEW]Fink Jakob Leth - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):153-154.
    This study defends the view that Plato’s account of meaning and truth does not depend on strong Platonism. Strong Platonism is based, among other things, on the assumption that basic entities are pure and cannot mix with anything. In a semantic theory, such entities provide stability of reference to single terms and so keep the danger of fluctuating meanings at bay. Unfortunately, strong Platonism pays a heavy price for this stability in that it cannot explain how terms can be combined (...)
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  77.  2
    Hume's True Scepticism by Donald C. Ainslie.Miriam Schleifer McCormick - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):167-168.
    In this rigorous and thorough discussion of David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature 1.4, entitled “Of the sceptical and other systems of philosophy,” Donald Ainslie aims both to provide detailed textual exegeses of all seven sections, and to offer a way of understanding them as unified by the recurring theme of the dangers of “false” philosophy and a defense of “true” philosophy or “true scepticism.” To understand the compatibility of Hume’s skeptical conclusions and his philosophical ambitions, and so to (...)
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  78.  1
    French Philosophy, 1572–1675 by Desmond Clarke.Michael Moriarty - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):162-163.
    Desmond Clarke adopts a broad understanding of the term ‘philosophy,’ informed by close attention to historical context. He discusses the limitations of early modern philosophy as an academic discipline, plausibly connecting its tendency to conservatism with the fact that philosophy teachers were generally recent graduates, employed for quite short periods, and thus ill-equipped to develop the subject. On the other hand, as he observes, “what is now described as philosophical reasoning or analysis was widely distributed in the publications of lawyers, (...)
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  79.  8
    Toward a Humean True Religion: Genuine Theism, Moderate Hope, and Practical Morality by Andre C. Willis.Paul Russell - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):168-169.
    Andre Willis argues that although Hume is generally credited with being a “devastating critic” of religion, it is a mistake to view Hume solely in these terms or to present him as an “atheist.” This not only represents a failure to appreciate Hume’s “middle path” between “militant atheists and evangelical theists”, it denies us an opportunity to “enhance” our understanding and appreciation of the positive, constructive value of religion through a close study of Hume’s views. Willis’s study presents Hume as (...)
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  80.  5
    Circling to Scientia: Reading Descartes in Light of the Debate Between Stoic Dogmatists and Academic Skeptics.Stuchlik Joshua - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):55-81.
    At the end of the Fifth Meditation, Descartes has the Meditator proclaim: “the certainty and truth of all knowledge depends uniquely on my awareness of the true God, to such an extent that I was incapable of perfect knowledge [perfecte scire] of anything else until I became aware of him”. Not so, complained the Second Objectors, for it seems an atheist can know, in the sense of being “clearly and distinctly aware,” that the angles of a triangle are equal to (...)
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  81.  4
    A New Text of Apuleius: The Lost Third Book of the De Platone by Justin A. Stover.Harold Tarrant - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):158-159.
    The publication of a new text on ancient philosophy tends to be an exciting event, but there can be years between discovery and availability. This is an extreme case. Raymond Klibansky discovered the text in 1949 and transcribed it, making it available to friends who were under an obligation not to anticipate his publication of it—which failed to happen. It contains summaries, of very different lengths, of the doctrinal content of thirteen Platonic dialogues. I saw the transcription of this so-called (...)
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  82.  13
    Givenness and Cognition: Reply to Grüne and Chignell.Watkins Eric & Willaschek Marcus - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):143-152.
    stefanie grüne takes issue with our claim that for an object to be given, this object must exist. On her view, givenness, according to Kant, does not require the existence of the object, but only its real possibility. She develops her critique in three steps. First, she argues that the reason why Kant requires objects to be given in intuition is that otherwise our concepts would not have ‘objective reality’ and would thus not constitute cognitions. But since the objective reality (...)
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  83.  71
    Kant's Account of Cognition.Eric Watkins & Marcus Willaschek - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):83-112.
    kant’s critique of pure reason undertakes a systematic investigation of the possibility of synthetic cognition a priori so as to determine whether this kind of cognition is possible in the case of traditional metaphysics.1 While much scholarly attention has been devoted to the distinction between analytic and synthetic judgments as well as to that between the a priori and the a posteriori, less attention has been devoted to understanding exactly what cognition is for Kant. In particular, it is often insufficiently (...)
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  84.  4
    Aristotle on Female Animals: A Study of the Generation of Animals by Sophia M. Connell.Charlotte Witt - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):157-158.
    “How can it be that the female is both functional and a failure?”. Sophia Connell’s response comes in the form of a careful, thorough, and philosophically sensitive interpretation of Aristotle’s treatise on animal generation. By pursuing the topic of what Aristotle says about female animals and their role in reproduction, Connell casts light into many difficult corners of his theory: What does it mean to say that the male is the “hê archê [tês] kinêseos” of the generation? How should we (...)
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