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  1.  3
    Occasionalism: From Metaphysics to Science Ed. By Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero, Mariangela Priarolo, and Emanuela Scribano.Fred Ablondi - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):404-405.
    This volume consists of papers originally presented at the international conference "Occasionalism: History and Problems," held in Venice in 2015; it contains twelve chapters, nine of which are in English, three in French. In their introduction, the editors describe occasionalism as a theory that was viewed by Medieval Christian philosophers as a "dangerous and treacherous" threat, only later to be "proudly asserted" in the post-Descartes era. This raises the question of to what degree this transition should be seen as a (...)
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  2.  6
    True in Word and Deed: Plato on the Impossibility of Divine Deception.Nicholas R. Baima & Tyler Paytas - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):193-214.
    Since God is omnipotent, he cannot die, he cannot be deceived, nor can he lie; and, as the Apostle says, 'He cannot deny himself.'... For if he could die, he would not be omnipotent; if he could lie, be deceived, deceive, or act in any unjust way, he would not be omnipotent, because if this were in him, he would not have been be worthy to be omnipotent.By 'God' I mean the very being the idea of whom is within me, (...)
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  3.  2
    Locke's Science of Knowledge by Matthew Priselac.Martha Brandt Bolton - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):405-406.
    This interesting and challenging book addresses the apparent gap between the empiricist account of the origin of ideas and the theory of knowledge in the Essay concerning Human Understanding. Matthew Priselac makes an impressive argument that they are complementary parts of a coherent program. It consists of a naturalistic interpretation on which the Essay's main aim is to provide the kind of understanding of the mind, knowledge, and probability afforded by modern methods of natural scientific inquiry.On this view, the Essay (...)
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  4.  2
    On the Experience of Activity: William James's Late Metaphysics and the Influence of Nineteenth-Century French Spiritualism.Jeremy Dunham - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):267-291.
    is it possible to have a first-person experience of our own agency? In nineteenth-century France, this question was subject to intense philosophical debate. The two figures primarily associated with each side of the debate were Maine de Biran and Charles Renouvier. Biran developed powerful objections to Hume's arguments that purported to prove the impossibility of the experience of one's inner causal force. These objections were the match that lit this philosophical fire, and formed the foundation of the philosophy of the (...)
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  5.  3
    An Inventory of the Extant Correspondence of Elisabeth of Bohemia, Princess Palatine.Sabrina Ebbersmeyer - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):325-398.
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  6.  8
    The Cambridge History of Moral Philosophy Ed. By Sacha Golob and Jens Timmermann.T. H. Irwin - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):415-419.
    Given its scope and the size of many Cambridge Histories, this volume is short. It is 751 pages long. The main text consist of 54 chapters of between 12 and 14 pages each. For comparison, The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy is 968 pages long. One might ask why the present volume could not be allowed a similar length. 200 more pages could have made for a much more useful book, as I will suggest below.The brevity of the chapters makes (...)
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  7.  3
    Avicenna's Outsourced Rationalism.Jari Kaukua - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):215-240.
    in a seminal and highly influential study, Werner Jaeger presented the development of Aristotle, or Aristotelianism, as the emergence of an empiricist alternative to the rationalist fold of Plato and Platonism.1 Pitting perceived phenomena against the recollection of innate ideas, Aristotle founded knowledge on the perception of universal features and regularities in concrete things instead of an intuitive access to a separate world of incorporeal forms. In close analysis, such a straightforward opposition is forced, of course, and sets aside a (...)
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  8.  3
    Aristotle on Earlier Greek Psychology: The Science of the Soul by Jason W. Carter.Colin Guthrie King - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):400-401.
    Once upon a time in the twentieth century, it was considered good sense by some to think that Aristotle began his De anima with a series of very Aristotelian theories about the soul, and that the function of its first book was to eristically taunt his predecessors for failing to appreciate hylomorphism, or patronizingly praise them for getting the odd bit right. Jason Carter deserves our thanks for showing how wrong-headed this reading of Aristotle is. His book begins with the (...)
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  9.  4
    The Death of Consciousness? James's Case Against Psychological Unobservables.Alexander Klein - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):293-323.
    Ame, vie, souffle, qui saurait bien les distinguer exactement?1like heartburn, a pronounced discomfort with the very idea of consciousness followed the early days of experimental psychology. Received wisdom has it that psychologists came to mistrust consciousness for largely behaviorist reasons—they are supposed to have worried about the alleged impossibility of performing quantifiable, repeatable measurements on an essentially private phenomenon.2 But this is a historical distortion, one that obscures some interesting and earlier philosophical concerns about the scientific study of consciousness.Behaviorists rejected (...)
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  10.  4
    Health and Hedonism in Plato and Epicurus by Kelly Arenson.David Konstan - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):401-402.
    Epicurus had a distinctive position on pleasure: the greatest possible pleasure consists in the absence of pain. The pain in question may be physical or psychological. Not to be hungry, cold, or otherwise distressed is the greatest pleasure that the body can know; to be free of fear, particularly the kind of vague, undirected anxiety that Lucretius called cura, is the most pleasant state that the mind can achieve. As Lucretius exclaims, "Do you not see that our nature cries out (...)
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  11.  1
    Aristotle's Science of Matter and Motion by Christopher Byrne.Mary Krizan - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):399-400.
    Seventeenth-century advancements in physical science are often presented as overthrowing the Aristotelian tradition; perhaps Aristotle's emphasis on formal and final causes left little room for a physical theory grounded in material and efficient causes. In Aristotle's Science of Matter and Motion, Christopher Byrne argues that Aristotle is not to blame, as he indeed possessed a unified theory of matter and motion. In contrast to traditional interpretations, which place an undue explanatory burden on formal and final causes, Byrne argues that Aristotle's (...)
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  12.  5
    Character and Causation: Hume's Philosophy of Action by Constantine Sandis.David Landy - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):406-407.
    Constantine Sandis's suggestive new book consists of a series of discrete studies of aspects of Hume's philosophical system that culminate in an argument for the conclusion that "on Hume's view... we are only morally responsible for that subset of actions that have been motivated by our character traits". That final conclusion is the end of a wide-ranging and systematic argument that feels too compressed in the scant one-hundred and twenty-three pages in which it is presented, especially since the philosophical and (...)
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  13.  1
    The Golden Age of Philosophy of Science, 1945 to 2000: Logical Reconstruction, Descriptivism, Normative, Naturalism, and Foundationalism by John Losee. [REVIEW]Daniel J. McKaughan - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):413-414.
    Should philosophers of science offer methodological prescriptions about how science ought to be practiced, or should they rest content with describing ways it has actually been practiced over time? Do the standards by which good science is assessed remain stable over time? How should rival philosophies of science be evaluated, and what role ought history of science play in such assessments? This book engages such questions while introducing a range of key ideas and debates by examining the four positions named (...)
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  14.  7
    The Emergence of Autonomy in Kant's Moral Philosophy Ed. By Stefano Bacin and Oliver Sensen.Kate A. Moran - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):407-409.
    Kant introduces autonomy in the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals as "the characteristic of the will by which it is a law to itself". Autonomy is Kant's solution to a puzzle about how to describe and account for moral obligation, which binds necessarily and cannot, therefore, be derived from any independent desire or interest. But Kant's pithy description of autonomy raises more questions than it settles. How is self-legislation possible in the first place? How is autonomy related to the (...)
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  15.  2
    Pessimism in Kant's Ethics and Rational Religion by Dennis Vanden Auweele.Karin Nisenbaum - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):409-410.
    In this book, Dennis Vanden Auweele explores the tension between pessimism and optimism in Kant's ethics and philosophy of religion. Going against a long tradition of interpretation that groups Kant together with other classic philosophers of hope, he aims to highlight the latent pessimism in Kant's works, and show that the full-blown pessimism of post-Kantian philosophers such as Schopenhauer can be read as the attempt to "think Kant's project through to its natural end". What Vanden Auweele means by 'pessimism' is (...)
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  16. Reading Wittgenstein with Anscombe, Going Onto Ethics by Cora Diamond.Peg O'Connor - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):412-413.
    In many ways, this is a difficult and important book about a difficult and important book about a difficult and important book. It is also much more, as Diamond highlights Anscombe's work on ethics and action as she moves to engage metaethical questions about relativism and truth. One of the unifying threads is the matter of thinking about thinking, especially the ways we respond to thinking that has gone astray. Thinking that does go astray traverses paths with "dangerous spots," as (...)
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  17.  2
    Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform by Laura Papish. [REVIEW]Francey Russell - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):410-411.
    Iris Murdoch wrote that we should always ask about any philosopher: "what are they afraid of?". One of Kant's most acute anxieties is the human tendency to motivated illusion and self-deception. For Kant, not only is it the case that "the depths of the human heart are unfathomable", but we human beings actively undermine our own efforts to know it, we "throw dust in our own eyes". In her book, Laura Papish offers a rich, holistic account of the Kantian person—not (...)
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  18.  1
    The Political Morality of the Late Scholastics: Civil Life, War and Conscience by Daniel Schwartz.Rudolf Schuessler - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):402-404.
    How should a crisis sparked by migration of the poor be dealt with? How should tax evasion be addressed? What is the appropriate response to manipulation of elections? Daniel Schwartz's book illustrates that moralists, lawyers, political decision makers, and society at large already contended with these issues some four hundred years ago. The underlying problems and their normative implications were thoroughly analyzed by scholastic authors at the time, many of whom wrote with an eye on influencing the emerging interested public, (...)
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  19. Emotion, Reason and Action in Kant by Maria Borges.Krista K. Thomason - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):411-412.
    Despite the fact that emotions have become an important part of Kant scholarship in the last thirty years and counting, few books are devoted to the topic. Borges's book remedies this lacuna. Kant scholars who are familiar with her work will be happy to see her account of emotions connected to other discussions of Kantian moral psychology.The book begins with a general account of actions, reasons, and causes. Given this background, Borges then raises the question: what role do emotions play (...)
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  20.  86
    Locke's Natural and Religious Epistemology.Shelley Weinberg - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):241-266.
    in their famous correspondence, Stillingfleet objects that Locke's definition of knowledge, by limiting certainty to the perception of the agreement or disagreement of ideas, lessens the credibility of faith. Locke replies that his definition of knowledge does not affect the credibility of an article of faith at all, for faith and knowledge are entirely different cognitive acts: The truth of the matter of fact is in short this, that I have placed knowledge in the perception of the agreement or disagreement (...)
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  21.  3
    Editorial Announcements.Jack Zupko - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):i-i.
    The JHP Board of Directors awards an annual prize of $5,000 for the best book in the history of philosophy published in the previous year. On the Board's behalf, I am pleased to announce that the winner of the prize for 2019 is Richard T. W. Arthur's Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads Through Leibniz's Labyrinth.The JHP Board of Directors also awards an annual prize of $1,500 for the best contribution to the Articles section of the Journal. On the Board's (...)
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  22.  24
    Mary Shepherd on Mind, Soul, and Self.Deborah Boyle - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):93-112.
    the philosophical writings ofx Lady Mary Shepherd were apparently well regarded in her own time, but dropped out of view in the mid-nineteenth century.1 Some historians of philosophy have recently begun attending to the distinctive arguments in Shepherd's two books, but the secondary literature that exists so far has largely focused on her critiques of Hume and Berkeley. However, many other themes and arguments in Shepherd's writings have not yet been explored. This paper takes up one such issue, what Shepherd (...)
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  23.  4
    Augustine and Wittgenstein Ed. By John Doody, Alexander E. Eodice, and Kim Paffenroth.Sarah Byers - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):186-187.
    Forty years ago in this journal, Herbert Spiegelberg examined Wittgenstein's direct references to Augustine in the works that were available to the public at that time. Although there are many allusions to Augustine in the portions of the Nachlass to which Spiegelberg did not have access, Wittgenstein read only the Confessions and his interest lay in a small set of topics for which certain sentences from Augustine served him as repeated proof texts. Given these facts and given how fundamentally Wittgenstein (...)
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  24.  3
    Physical Action, Species, and Matter: The Debate Between Roger Bacon and Peter John Olivi.Dominique Demange & Yael Kedar - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):49-69.
    did roger bacon and peter john olivi ever meet? We suggest a positive answer to this question. After he became a Franciscan in 1257, Roger Bacon spent ten years at the Franciscan Paris convent. In those years he wrote the De multiplicatione specierum —his most thought-out piece—the Opus majus, Opus minus, and Opus tertium, which he completed by early 1268. It is not clear whether Bacon returned to England after 1268, or remained in Paris until 1280.1 Peter John Olivi wrote (...)
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  25.  3
    Jewish Philosophy in the Middle Ages: Science, Rationalism, and Religion by Tamar M. Rudavsky.James A. Diamond - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):171-172.
    Tamar Rudavsky's erudite survey of Jewish philosophy during the Middle Ages is the latest compendium of a wide array of thinkers who profoundly constructed bridges between the two worlds of Jewish beliefs informed by the Hebrew Bible and its rabbinic overlay at one end, and of science and philosophy dominated by Aristotelian physics and metaphysics at the other. Jewish philosophers, like their Islamic and Christian counterparts, tirelessly exerted themselves to reconcile the two into a unified system. The very title of (...)
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  26.  12
    The Heart of Flesh: Nietzsche on Affects and the Interpretation of the Body.Christopher Fowles - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):113-139.
    in a nachlass fragment of 1888, Nietzsche refers to psychology as "Affektenlehre"—the doctrine or theory of the affects.1 Given his contention elsewhere that psychology represents the "path to the fundamental problems", it should come as no surprise that Nietzsche makes reference to affects in numerous prominent passages, and throughout some of his most important works.2 Yet, as Peter Poellner has claimed, one might "feel that not much is gained by [Nietzsche's] assertions in the absence of a detailed account of what (...)
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  27.  88
    Conviction, Priority, and Rationalism in Aristotle's Epistemology.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):1-27.
    In this paper I argue against rationalist readings of Aristotle's epistemology, on which our scientific understanding is justified on the basis of certain demonstrative first principles that are themselves justified only by some brute form of rational intuition. I then investigate the relationship between our intuition of principles and the broadly perceptual knowledge from which it derives. I argue that, for Aristotle, perceptual knowledge helps justify our intuition of principles, and also serves as an authority against which these principles and (...)
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  28.  5
    The Elements of Avicenna's Physics: Greek Sources and Arabic Innovations by Andreas Lammer.Bilal Ibrahim - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):168-170.
    In this timely and outstanding contribution, Andreas Lammer tackles central concepts and problems in Avicenna's Physics of the Healing. The analysis provides a wide-ranging but cohesive study of Avicenna's approach and ideas. The philological and philosophical analysis of the historical context of Avicenna's arguments pays dividends. Avicenna's—often radical—reworking of Aristotle's approach in the Physics critically engages a long tradition of Peripatetic and Neoplatonic philosophy in Greek and Arabic. Lammer's contribution, based on his doctoral dissertation, lays fertile ground for future work. (...)
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  29.  32
    "All in Their Nature Good": Descartes on the Passions of the Soul.Marie Jayasekera - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):71-92.
    Descartes claims that the passions of the soul are “all in their nature good” even though they exaggerate the value of their objects, have the potential to deceive us, and often mislead us. What, then, can he mean by this? In this paper, I argue that these effects of the passions are only problematic when we incorrectly take their goodness to consist in their informing us of harms and benefits to the mind-body composite. Instead, the passions are good in their (...)
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  30.  18
    Kant on the Sources of Metaphysics: The Dialectic of Pure Reason by Marcus Willaschek. [REVIEW]Markus Kohl - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):181-182.
    This book is about the Transcendental Dialectic in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Unlike most other treatments of this subject matter, it does not focus on Kant's criticisms of metaphysical arguments. Rather, it considers Kant's account of why "metaphysical speculation about the unconditioned"—for instance, about objects like God or the entire world—"arises naturally and inevitably out of the very structure of human reason".Willaschek posits "a three-part template underlying" Kant's account of how we are led to make unwarranted metaphysical judgments: " (...)
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  31.  10
    Hobbes and the Two Faces of Ethics by Arash Abizadeh.S. A. Lloyd - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):174-175.
    Arash Abizadeh's main thesis is that Hobbes severed juridical obligation—a covenant-created practice of second-personal accountability—from allegedly prudential natural law, marking a "watershed" separation of the right from the good. Daniel Eggers, Mark Peacock, and David D. Raphael fruitfully explored that thesis. The proposed independence is doubtful because natural law both underwrites and constrains covenant: "a...
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  32.  4
    Kant and His German Contemporaries, Volume II: Aesthetics, History, Politics, and Religion Ed. By Daniel O. Dahlstrom.Gualtiero Lorini - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):179-180.
    In continuity with the first volume of the series, edited by Corey W. Dyck and Falk Wunderlich, whose focus was on "Logic, Mind, Epistemology, Science and Ethics," this collection of essays carries on an impressive project in the history of thought and ideas that, due to its breadth and depth of analysis, can be compared to Dieter Henrich's monumental Konstellationen. Probleme und Debatten am Ursprung der idealistischen Philosophie. Yet, while the latter's program aimed at tracing the personal and intellectual relations (...)
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  33.  7
    The Problem of Universals From Boethius to John of Salisbury by Roberto Pinzani.John Marenbon - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):170-171.
    Roberto Pinzani has written a closely-argued, highly original, valuable but difficult book. The Problem of Universals, indeed, is—and has been for nearly two centuries—the most frequently treated topic in medieval philosophy, and solutions to it proposed by two of the philosophers discussed here, Boethius and Abelard, have been examined countless times. But no one has before tried to cover the whole period, from circa 500 to circa 1150, looking in detail at a whole variety of writers. Moreover, what Pinzani has (...)
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  34.  3
    Peirce on Realism and Idealism by Robert Lane.Rosa Maria Mayorga - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):184-185.
    Traditionally considered opposing views, realism and idealism were both endorsed by Charles Peirce, founder of pragmatism. Robert Lane proposes to defend the underlying consistency of Peirce's views on these two issues by tracing their evolution and the coextensive effect on the rest of his innovative philosophy. This is no easy task, as anyone who has attempted to study Peirce's vast oeuvre can confirm. Among the many challenges to this undertaking is the fact that much of Peirce's thought, which covers the (...)
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  35.  4
    La Vision Politique de Malebranche by Raffaele Carbone.Denis Moreau - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):177-178.
    Le jugement qu'on portera sur ce livre dépendra en grande partie de la façon dont on évaluera son contenu en fonction des attentes créées par son titre. Si l'on espère une mise au jour—qui, de fait, serait novatrice—d'une pensée précise, développée et systématique de Malebranche sur les thèmes cardinaux de la philosophie politique classique, on sera déçu: ce livre ne contient rien de tel, sinon, dans une certaine mesure, en sa troisième partie. Si l'on compte lire une monographie informée offrant (...)
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  36.  5
    Richard A. "Red" Watson, 1930–2019.Steven Nadler - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):vii-ix.
    On September 18, 2019, the Cartesian scholar Richard A. Watson, known to his family, friends, and colleagues as "Red," passed away at the age of 88.watson was born in 1930 in new market, Iowa, where he met his wife Patty Jo in middle school. He went on to earn a Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Iowa, studying under Richard H. Popkin. After a brief stint teaching at the University of Michigan, Watson spent most of his career at Washington (...)
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  37.  4
    Aristotle's Theory of Bodies by Christian Pfeiffer.Scott O'Connor - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):167-168.
    Aristotle uses 'body' to describe the matter of animals, the elements and what they compose, as well as magnitudes extended in three-dimensions. These last bodies belong to the category of quantity, alongside surfaces and lines. It is this notion of body that interests Christian Pfeiffer, who presents Aristotle's various discussions of it as one exhaustive theory of body. According to this theory, magnitudes are form-matter composites, where boundaries are forms and extensions are matter. The boundary of a body is its (...)
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  38.  7
    Another Mind-Body Problem: A History of Racial Non-Being by John Harfouch.Susan Peppers-Bates - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):183-184.
    Despite ideals of philosophical objectivity, who speaks is as important as what is said, and those who fall outside the Eurocentric male norm often are not heard or invited to participate in theorizing. New work chronicling and challenging the creation of white supremacist ideology in philosophy is needed greatly. In this important book, Another Mind-Body Problem: A History of Racial Non-Being, John Harfouch reveals the hermeneutical injustice that obscures how professional philosophers understand the mind-body problem today and how the terms (...)
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  39.  4
    L'Empreinte Cartésienne: L'interaction Psychophysique, Débats Classiques Et Contemporains by Sandrine Roux.Andrew Platt - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):175-177.
    Sandrine Roux's L'Empreinte cartésienne addresses what she describes as one of the "persistent problems" in philosophy, namely, the mind-body problem raised by Descartes's substance dualism. Her book carefully lays out the various puzzles, both real and perceived, raised by Descartes's theory of humans as a mind-body union. She distinguishes clearly between the way these problems are understood by Descartes, and the way they were seen by some of his seventeenth-century followers, especially the occasionalists, Louis de La Forge, Géraud de Cordemoy, (...)
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  40.  6
    Aesthetic Reason and Imaginative Freedom: Friedrich Schiller and Philosophy Ed. By María Del Rosario Acosta López and Jeffrey L. Powell.Sabine Roehr - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):178-179.
    In the past, Schiller has often been underestimated as a philosopher in his own right. Fortunately, this has been changing, beginning with the bicentennial commemoration of his death in 2005, which has since then produced a fair number of volumes, mostly in French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Unfortunately, Frederick Beiser's 2005 Schiller the Philosopher: A Re-Examination, one of the still rare book-length treatments by a single author, has failed to lead to a similar "new wave" in the English-speaking world. Thus, (...)
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  41.  5
    Hobbes on Politics and Religion Ed. By Laurens van Apeldoorn and Robin Douglass.Monicka Tutschka - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):172-174.
    It is refreshing to read fifteen erudite articles written by seasoned experts and promising young scholars who engage the wide-ranging question of the intersection of religion and politics in Hobbes's works. The free standing arguments are not framed by Hobbes's alleged religious sincerity, or by a priori conceptions of natural law, or some modernization thesis. This work is therefore a must-read for scholars yearning to explore Hobbes's religious politics in new ways. I hope it inspires more volumes, possibly organized around (...)
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  42.  7
    Schlick and Wittgenstein: The Theory of Affirmations Revisited.Thomas Uebel - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):141-166.
    the ready availability of wittgenstein's previously unpublished writings from his so-called middle period of 1929 to 1936 has greatly enriched our understanding of the development of his thought. For obvious reasons, however, it has had little effect on the interpretation of Wittgenstein's contemporaries. At the time, few, even amongst those who had by then taken note of the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, were apprised of the new avenues Wittgenstein's thought had begun to take. One such rare exception was Moritz Schlick, the nominal (...)
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  43.  6
    Metaphysics of Freedom? Kant's Concept of Cosmological Freedom in Historical and Systematic Perspective Ed. By Christian Krijnen.Reed Winegar - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):182-183.
    This volume of essays, written in English and German, focuses primarily on Kant's concept of transcendental freedom. The first Critique famously introduces this concept of freedom in the third antinomy, where Kant examines the apparent tension between the world's need for an uncaused cause and the world's thorough causal determination. Thus, Kant's concept of transcendental freedom is, as this volume emphasizes, a cosmological conception of freedom. Although the volume claims to consider Kant's conception of cosmological freedom from both historical and (...)
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  44. Comprehension, Demonstration, and Accuracy in Aristotle.Breno Zuppolini - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):29-48.
    according to aristotle's posterior analytics, scientific expertise is composed of two different cognitive dispositions. Some propositions in the domain can be scientifically explained, which means that they are known by "demonstration", a deductive argument in which the premises are explanatory of the conclusion. Thus, the kind of cognition that apprehends those propositions is called "demonstrative knowledge".1 However, not all propositions in a scientific domain are demonstrable. Demonstrations are ultimately based on indemonstrable principles, whose knowledge is called "comprehension".2 If the knowledge (...)
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