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  1.  10
    Like a Cypress among Pliant Shrubs. Kabbalah and Reformed Orthodoxy in the Philologia Sacra of Jacob Rhenferd (1654–1712). [REVIEW]Marcello Cattaneo - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):261-292.
    Jacob Rhenferd (1654–1712), professor of Hebrew and Oriental languages at the University of Franeker in the United Provinces, is a mostly forgotten figure. This article analyses his theological and historical scholarship, with special attention to his use of Jewish mystical texts. It argues that Rhenferd’s conception of philologia sacra was profoundly shaped by kabbalistic insights and that a recourse to Kabbalah provided him with an idiom to articulate anew some foundational Reformed doctrines. Conversely, a comparison with the kabbalistic studies of (...)
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  2.  11
    Pico’s Conclusions. Setting, Structure, Text, Sources and Aims.Brian P. Copenhaver - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):57-107.
    Giovanni Pico della Mirandola had his 900 Conclusions printed late in 1486, just a few weeks before Pope Innocent VIII attacked thirteen of them. Did Pico intend to provoke the Vatican? If not, what was his aim, what were his means and what was the product? The Conclusions looks like a miscellany, just as Pico described it. But disorder was only on the surface, in line with a purpose explicitly stated: keeping the holiest truths hidden. Pico’s informants about esoteric wisdom (...)
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  3.  12
    Identifying and Censoring Improper Artworks in Carlo Borromeo’s Diocese. The Sixteenth-Century Index of Profane Paintings in the Milan Diocesan Archives.Lea Debernardi - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):159-191.
    Due to the elusive nature of the surviving documentation, it is often difficult to assess in what areas and to what extent the Tridentine prescriptions on sacred images led to acts of censorship directed at works of art. The Milanese diocese at the time of Archbishop Carlo Borromeo (1564–84) stands out as a rare case for which policies concerning the control of sacred art and their practical implementation are relatively well documented. This article examines Borromeo’s legislation on religious artworks and (...)
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  4.  17
    One Ring to Find Them All. John of Northampton’s Anulus(c. 1348) and the Culture of Calendrical Reckoning in Fourteenth-Century Europe. [REVIEW]C. P. E. Nothaft - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):35-55.
    This article investigates a little-known computational and mnemonic device invented in c. 1348 by the English Carmelite friar John of Northampton, the details of which are known from a treatise written in or before 1394 by Richard Maidstone, a theologian and fellow member of the Carmelite Order. John’s anulus took the form of a metal finger ring whose wearer could use the complex arrangement of its alphanumeric inscriptions to make a range of calendrical calculations as well as predict the times (...)
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  5.  8
    Traces on a Rhodian Shore. The Humanist Origins of a Scientific Metaphor.Mordechai Feingold - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):1-34.
    The present article explores the productive afterlife of the Vitruvian anecdote concerning Aristippus’s shipwreck on the shore of Rhodes. Known to several medieval scholars, the anecdote came into vogue during the Renaissance, when it was transformed into a potent metaphor mobilised by moralists, educators and religious authors. Not until the sixteenth century, however, did mathematicians come to recognise the value in appropriating the metaphor as a means to elevate the dignity of their discipline. Two centuries later, having accomplished their mission, (...)
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  6.  14
    On the Spelling of ‘Author’.Stephanie Ann Frampton - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):333-345.
    The reason for the lexical transformation of classical Latin auctor and auctoritas into Neo-Latin author and authoritas has remained obscure outside of specialist literature. This note offers a consolidated account of the matter in English. Based on a minor misreading of Priscian’s Institutiones grammaticae by glossators active at the turn of the thirteenth century, a back-formation of Latin author by analogy with Greek αὐθέντης and αὐθεντία was proposed by humanist scholars in the sixteenth century. Once introduced, the Neo-Latin fricative th (...)
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  7.  9
    From Hogarth to Nosferatu. The Iconographic History of the Madman’s Wall Motif.Tomáš Kolich - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):293-331.
    The film Nosferatu (1922) has graffiti created by the character of the madman Knock on the walls of his cell. This motif, which I call the ‘madman’s wall’, has accompanied depictions of lunatics since the beginning of the eighteenth century. This article examines the origin, transformations and functions of this motif. The popularisation of the motif originates with the longitude diagram in the last plate of A Rake’s Progress (1735) by William Hogarth, which subsequently found its way into the works (...)
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  8.  9
    ‘A Spring of Immortal Colours’. Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues (c. 1533–1588) and Picturing Plants in the Sixteenth Century. [REVIEW]Monique Kornell & Dániel Margócsy - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):109-157.
    The Huguenot refugee artist Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues is traditionally known for his observations of North America and as the author of numerous albums of floral drawings. This article reassesses the attribution of several of these albums to Le Moyne based on documentary and stylistic evidence. It identifies the sixteenth-century Huguenot nobleman and diplomat Jacques de Morogues as the owner of one of the albums, and it discusses the production and early use of these albums as luxury gifts in (...)
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  9.  5
    Cardinal Nephews and Ottomans in Two Thesis Prints by Giovanni Luigi Valesio.Karen Lloyd - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):231-260.
    Bolognese painter and printmaker Giovanni Luigi Valesio’s varied output included engravings featuring heraldic imagery coupled with allegorical figures and, in some cases, perplexing narratives. Their erudite, panegyric character is typical of thesis prints, elaborate ephemera made for the festive academic defences that flourished in early modern colleges. This essay establishes the heretofore unknown subject of one thesis print and offers a note on the dedicatee and art historical significance of another likely ‘conclusione’. Both prints were dedicated to cardinal nephews, Scipione (...)
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  10.  8
    Building a Ludovisian Monument. The Apparato of the Arts in the Cornerstone Ceremony of the Church of Sant’Ignazio di Loyola in Rome.Eneko Ortega Mentxaka - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):193-229.
    This article discusses the foundation ceremony of the church of Sant’Ignazio di Loyola in Rome, the new chapel of the Collegio Romano. The ceremony was held in the Collegio’s existing smaller chapel, dedicated to the Annunziata, in 1626. The ceremony was led by the sponsor of the new church, Cardinal Ludovico Ludovisi, the nephew of the late Pope Gregory XV and one of the greatest art collectors of his time. The extraordinary apparato of the foundation ceremony focussed on the personifications (...)
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  11.  9
    The Painted Fly and the Connoisseur in Eighteenth-Century British Literature.Robert G. Walker - 2023 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 86 (1):347-354.
    The ‘musca depicta’ trope is well known to art historians, with a history going back to Pliny. It flourished in the Renaissance, but in eighteenth-century England the meaning of the trope was altered greatly when employed in popular culture, both in live theatrical presentations (by George Alexander Stevens) and in published poetry (by James Robertson, comedian of York). Originally, the trope signalled the virtuosity of the painter, who was able to fool the eye by depicting flies so real that the (...)
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