Journal of Continental Philosophy

ISSNs: 2688-3554, 2688-3562

8 found

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  1.  31
    Woman Life Freedom.Debra Bergoffen - 2023 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 4 (1):71-91.
    Detailing the logic of Clausewitz’s depiction of war as the violent pursuit of the politics of submission, I read the recent protests in Iran as a feminist revolt against Iran’s fundamentalist Islamic war on women. This war is institutionalized in the war-like violence of veiling, gender apartheid, and marriage and family law. Rebelling under the slogan “Woman, Life, Freedom” the people of Iran tie the destiny of women to the destiny of all. The government has crushed the uprising. It has (...)
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  2.  18
    Hegel on Death and War.Gary Browning - 2023 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 4 (1):93-106.
    Hegel sees war as contributing positively to the experience of social and political life. Of course, his support for war is qualified in that the overall aim is to maintain peace and to mitigate the violence and destruc­tion of warfare. Nonetheless Hegel takes individual citizens to appreciate the achievement of social and political life in the light of war, and how the patriotism evidenced in war reinforces their recognition of the freedom and unity of public life. Hegel’s support for war (...)
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  3.  7
    Time and Catastrophe.Chris Fleming & Jean-Pierre Dupuy - 2023 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 4 (1):11-25.
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  4.  10
    The Scandal of the Body Politic.Gregory Fried - 2023 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 4 (1):107-130.
    Classical liberalism stipulates that individuals may only reliably escape a state of war by joining a body politic whose unity is consolidated and preserved by the formation of a sovereign government. Frederick Douglass, through his own experience of slavery and then as a radical abolitionist critiquing the racialized laws and society of the United States, shows that there is an inherent scandal, a schism in the very idea of a body politic. This scandal cannot be overcome, but Douglass enacts a (...)
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  5.  4
    Editor's Introduction.Peter J. Hutchings - 2023 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 4 (1):1-9.
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  6.  19
    Greek Civil War.Nicole Loraux, Alex Ling, Jean Andreau, Etienne Balibar, Eliane de Latour, Michel Dobry, Alain Guillerm, Alain Joxe, Denis Peschansky & Emmanuel Terray - 2023 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 4 (1):27-60.
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  7.  12
    All Other Time is PEACE.Nick Mansfield - 2023 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 4 (1):131-149.
    Nothing is more definitive of war than its relationship with peace. But what is peace? This paper investigates the problematic nature of peace in the philosophical discourse on war, by investigating two key strands of thinking. Firstly, Hobbes and Foucault see peace as the place where the impulses that give rise to war can be re-directed and even satisfied, often in disguise. Another strand, in Kant and Levinas, different but not fully separable from the first, sees peace as what lies (...)
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  8.  19
    Philosophy and the War.Fritz Mauthner & Thomas Hainscho - 2023 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 4 (1):61-70.
    Fritz Mauthner’s essay Die Philosophie und der Krieg, published in October 1914, is among the nationalist writings of Mauthner written during the First World War. The essay explores the question of returning to philosophy after the war. Asking this question, Mauthner examines the relationship between war and philosophy and argues that the two concepts do not share any substantial points of contact. During his discussion, an unspoken premise of the question about the return to philosophy is revealed: as the science (...)
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