Year:

  1.  2
    Ghost-Managed Medicine: Big Pharma’s Invisible Hands by Sergio Sismondo. [REVIEW]Leemon B. McHenry - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29.
    Ghost-Managed Medicine exposes the conspiracy to conceal all of the players in the marketing of drugs, including ghostwriters, key opinion leaders, patient advocacy organizations, contract research organizations, publication planners, and even medical journal editors and publishers. The credibility of the claims conveyed by the industry depends on the invisibility of these players.
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  2.  6
    Being and Owning: The Body, Bodily Material, and the Law by Jesse Wall. [REVIEW]Sean Aas - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):13-16.
    Jesse Wall's Being and Owning: The Body, Bodily Material, and the Law addresses the legal status of 'bodily material'; items which used to be, but are no longer, part of a living human organism: especially, 'separated' materials like gametes or tissue samples, and cadavers and other mortal remains. Wall's discussion, however, ranges widely across jurisprudential and philosophical issues concerning our relation to our bodies and our rights in them. His central, plausible contention is that body rights, though a kind of (...)
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  3.  3
    Navigating the Perfect Storm: Ethical Guidance for Conducting Research Involving Participants with Multiple Vulnerabilities.Andrew M. Childress & Christopher R. Thomas - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):451-478.
    The development of ethical guidelines and regulations regarding human subjects research has focused upon protection of vulnerable populations by relying on a limited typology of vulnerabilities. This results in several challenges: First, Institutional Review Boards struggle to interpret and apply the regulations because they are often vague and inconsistent. Second, applying the regulations to subjects who fit within multiple categories of vulnerability can lead to contradictions and the rejection of research that would be permissible if only one category were applicable. (...)
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  4.  5
    Microaggressions in Clinical Medicine.Lauren Freeman & Heather Stewart - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):411-449.
    Damon Tweedy is a psychiatrist, lawyer, and writer. He's also Black. While in his first year as a medical student at Duke University, one of his professors approached him in the classroom and asked why the light bulb in the room hadn't been changed, as requested. Tweedy realized that his professor assumed he was a maintenance worker, not a student. Tweedy never took up this incident with the professor, nor did the professor ever apologize. Tweedy recounts that his best "revenge" (...)
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  5.  3
    Toward a Small Family Ethic: How Overpopulation and Climate Change Are Affecting the Morality of Procreation by Travis Rieder.Trevor Hedberg - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):8-13.
    The global human population is currently about 7.6 billion people, and our numbers are still increasing. Although human population growth has not been a popular topic to discuss in the last quarter-century, its contribution to various environmental problems is becoming harder and harder to ignore. Travis Rieder's Toward a Small Family Ethic confronts the effects of population growth and addresses what individual procreative obligations might follow from it.This short book consists of five chapters. Rieder begins with a description of the (...)
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  6. Editorial Note.Rebecca Kukla - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):ix-xi.
    This issue's lead article, Alison Reiheld's "Rightly or For Ill: The Ethics of Individual Memory," takes up a topic that is manifestly deserving of philosophical analysis, and routinely important in our private and public interactions, and yet as far as I know it has never before received systematic treatment: the ethics of memory. That is, Reiheld asks, when are we morally blameworthy or praiseworthy for remembering, forgetting, or encoding a memory in a specific way, and what are the ethical principles (...)
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  7.  6
    Bioethicists Are More Like Bricoleurs Than Engineers: Reflections on Fredrik Svenaeus' Phenomenological Bioethics.Erik Parens - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):479-486.
    In America in the 1960s, ethics was out of fashion. Scientists tended to think it was as wooly and "ideological" as religion, and many philosophers agreed. But advances in the biosciences and biotechnologies made the need for ethical reflection hard to ignore. Ethics needed what today we would call rebranding.The new field devoted to questions arising with advances in the biosciences and biotechnologies would be called "bioethics." As theologian Warren Reich put it when reflecting back on the birth of bioethics (...)
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  8.  2
    Rightly or for Ill: The Ethics of Individual Memory.Alison Reiheld - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):377-410.
    And lest things which should be remembered perish with time and vanish from the memory of those who are to come after us, I, seeing so many evils and the whole world, as it were, placed within the grasp of the Evil One, waiting among the dead for death to come, have put into writing all the things that I have witnessed.In this investigation, I focus primarily on individual memory behaviors for which we commonly blame and praise each other. Alas, (...)
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  9.  2
    Sex Itself: The Search for Male and Female in the Human Genome by Sarah S. Richardson.Maayan Sudai - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):1-8.
    Following the tradition of feminist philosophers and scholars of science from the 1980s onward such as Evelyn Fox-Keller, Helen Longino, Anne Fausto-Sterling, and others who revealed how popular notions of masculinity and femininity infiltrated and shaped the content of scientific knowledge, Sarah S. Richardson's book Sex Itself: The Search for Male and Female in the Human Genome deserves a place on the shelf with this canonical literature. It addresses one of the most celebrated symbols of biological sex binary: the X (...)
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