Year:

  1. Editorial Note.Rebecca Kukla - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):ix-xi.
    How can we conceptualize and promote agential choices in a complicated social world—one in which institutional, cultural, and marketing pressures convey values and norms that may not be in the best interest of individual patients? In this issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, Eric Racine and his colleagues explore this difficult question in the context of “preclinical” Alzheimer’s disease and complementary and alternative medicines. This is an especially murky and vexed context in which to think about patient agency, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  1
    The Duty to Rescue and Investigators' Obligations.Douglas MacKay & Tina Rulli - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):71-105.
    The duty to rescue is a highly plausible and powerful ethical principle. It requires agents to assist others in extreme need in cases where doing so does not conflict with some weighty moral aim; requires little personal sacrifice; and is likely to significantly benefit the recipients.1 As a general obligation, it binds all persons simply qua persons, and it is owed to all persons simply qua persons. Clinical investigators working in low-income countries frequently encounter sick or destitute people to whom (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  2
    Becoming Human: The Ontogenesis, Metaphysics, and Expression of Human Emotionality by Jennifer Greenwood.Odenbaugh Jay - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):1-4.
    Becoming Human by Jennifer Greenwood is one of the most thought-provoking books on emotion and its expression I have read. At its core, it attempts to provide an account of the development of full human emotionality and in so doing argues the emotions are “transcranial.” Emotions are radically realized outside our nervous systems and beyond our skin. As children, we are functionally integrated affectively with our mothers; so much so that in a sense our emotions are not ours alone. Regardless (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Contextualized Autonomy and Liberalism: Broadening the Lenses on Complementary and Alternative Medicines in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease.Eric Racine, John Aspler, Cynthia Forlini & Jennifer A. Chandler - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):1-41.
    Concerns about the possibility of a sharp rise in the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in Western nations have led to both the significant deployment of resources and the development of national research and healthcare plans. Although often focused on treatment, substantial efforts have also been dedicated toward preventing or delaying AD onset. As a result, recent technological and biomedical advances have greatly improved the understanding of AD pathophysiology. While some new tests can assess only risk ), some tests for certain (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Public Reasoning and Health-Care Priority Setting: The Case of NICE.Benedict Rumbold, Albert Weale, Annette Rid, James Wilson & Peter Littlejohns - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):107-134.
    Health systems that provide for universal patient access through a scheme of prepayments—whether through taxes, social insurance, or a combination of the two—need to make decisions on the scope of coverage that they secure. Such decisions are inherently controversial, implying, as they do, that some patients will receive less than comprehensive health care, or less than complete protection from the financial consequences of ill-heath, even when there is a clinically effective therapy to which they might have access.Controversial decisions of this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Death or Disability: The Carmentis Machine and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children by Dominic Wilkinson.Wasserman David - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):4-11.
    Dominic Wilkinson, a neonatal physician and medical ethicist, has written a searching, moving, and philosophically sophisticated book about the ethics of life and death decision making in the neonatal intensive care unit. Although I will devote much of this review to criticism, I want to say at the outset that Death or Disability represents interdisciplinary work at its very best. Wilkinson’s exposition is both rich in detail and uncompromising in its ethical analysis. He spares the reader none of the clinical, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Guardianship and Clinical Research Participation: The Case of Wards with Disorders of Consciousness.Megan S. Wright, Michael R. Ulrich & Joseph J. Fins - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):43-70.
    Incapacitated adults with a legally appointed guardian or conservator may be recruited for or involved with medical, behavioral, or social science research. Much of the research in which such persons participate is aimed at evaluating medical interventions for them, or contributing to general knowledge about disorders from which they may suffer. In this paper we will consider how the appointment of guardians for patients with disorders of consciousness —severe brain injuries that affect a patient’s level of arousal and ability to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues