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  1.  1
    Choosing Disability, Visualizing Care.Adams Rachel - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):301-321.
    Hanging in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC is a painting of Christopher Reeve in a massive power wheelchair. Where we might expect it to prioritize face and torso, instead it brings Reeve's lower legs and feet to the foreground so that his knees and shins appear monumental. Rosemarie Garland-Thomson has praised artist Sacha Newley for conferring his subject with "dignity and authority". To her, Reeve is a regal figure, his wheelchair a "throne," his respirator and shaved head appearing (...)
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  2.  1
    The Minority Body by Elizabeth Barnes.Ron Amundson - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):5-9.
    Professor Elizabeth Barnes has produced a tightly and carefully reasoned philosophical examination of the significance of disability. It provides a clear defense of certain core principles of the disability rights movement in contrast to the many professional philosophers who consider that movement to be ill-conceived. An example of this tradition can be seen in the volume From Choice to Chance: Genetics and Justice, coauthored by four of the most prominent bioethicists of the turn of the century. I confess to the (...)
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  3.  3
    Choosing Accommodations: Signed Language Interpreting and the Absence of Choice.Teresa Blankmeyer Burke - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):267-299.
    The ethical and philosophical issues of choosing disability accommodations, particularly regarding human service provider accommodations, have not received much attention in the academic literature. Signed language interpreting is an especially complex accommodation that requires assessment of the deaf person's language knowledge and facility in a society where the many varieties of deaf education have generated a continuum of American Sign Language and signed English. Signed language interpreters with variable levels of skill and proficiency flock to work in locations with high (...)
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  4.  46
    The Complicated Relationship of Disability and Well-Being.Stephen M. Campbell & Joseph A. Stramondo - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):151-184.
    Most people take it for granted that disability is a bad thing. They assume that, barring rare exceptions, having a disability is bad for or harmful to the person who is disabled. In other words, the common belief is that disability tends to have a negative impact on one's well-being. We follow Ron Amundson in calling this the Standard View.1 This view undergirds a range of significant practices in contemporary life, such as the allocation of funding for genetics research initiatives (...)
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  5.  1
    Disability Bioethics: From Theory to Practice.Rosemarie Garland-Thomson - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):323-339.
    What has come to be called critical disability studies is an emergent field of academic research, teaching, theory building, public scholarship, and something I'll call "educational advocacy." The critical part of critical disability studies suggests its alignment with areas of intellectual inquiry, sometimes awkwardly called identity studies, rooted in the political and social transformations of the mid-20th century brought forward by the broad civil and human rights movement. These movements pressed both the law and the social order toward an expansion (...)
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  6.  2
    The Wrong of Injustice: Dehumanization and its Role in Feminist Philosophy by Mari Mikkola.Kathryn Gillespie - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):1-5.
    Mari Mikkola identifies three primary forms of social injustice—oppression, domination, and discrimination—and asks what makes them wrong. She argues that feminist philosophy has thus far focused heavily on gender as a lens or anchor through which to understand and respond to injustice. In Mikkola's view, this orientation around gender is limiting feminist philosophers' theoretical engagement with the roots of injustice. To remedy this problem, she builds a case for moving toward a more broadly humanist conception of injustice. The humanist feminism (...)
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  7.  5
    How Not to Argue for Selective Reproductive Procedures.Eva Feder Kittay - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):185-215.
    Disability theorists have argued that the belief that we should prevent the birth of people with disabilities is prejudicial against disabled people. Particularly influential has been the Expressivity Objection to reproductive selective procedures aimed at eliminating disability. The Expressivity Objection in its strongest form says that to prevent the birth of a disabled child is to express the view that a disabled life is not worth living. In its weaker form, it says that to prevent the birth of a disabled (...)
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  8.  3
    Choosing Flourishing: Toward a More "Binocular" Way of Thinking About Disability.Erik Parens - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):135-150.
    It is hardly news to readers of this collection that in bioethics there has been a long-standing debate between people who can seem to be arguing "for" disability and people who can seem to be arguing "against" it. Those who have argued for have often been disability scholars and those who have argued against have often been philosophers of a utilitarian bent. At least since the mid 2000s, some disability scholars and some philosophers of a utilitarian bent have sought to (...)
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  9. Pathological, Disabled, Transgender: The Ethics, History, Laws, and Contradictions in Models That Best Serve Transgender Rights.Wahlert Lance & Gill Sabrina - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):249-266.
    In an October 2014 front-page story in the New York Times, multiple cultural critics, professors, and lesbian/gay/bisexual/trans/queer activists weighed in on the topic of gender-specific forms of federally sanctioned identification, particularly focusing on birth certificates. As Ron Rosenbaum has recently explained, contemporary science tells us that a sex binary does not exist. In fact, multiple factors, such as physical appearance, DNA analysis, and hormone production create a complicated spectrum of non-binary and intersecting sexual identities. Forcing people to prescribe to this (...)
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  10.  1
    Editorial Note.Lance Wahlert & Stephen M. Campbell - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):ix-xii.
    "I say that the strongest principle of growth lies in human choice."Reduced to its most basic task, bioethics is about choices. What is the ethical or unethical decision at a particular biomedical moment? What is most just or unjust for a disabled or infirmed loved one? What feels like the morally right or wrong decision in a healthcare moment? "Should we or shouldn't we" at a medical impasse?Understandably, the question of choice has found an especially prominent and ethically contentious place (...)
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  11.  2
    Better Parenting Through Biomedical Modification: A Case for Pluralism, Deference, and Charity.David Wasserman - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):217-247.
    The moral limits on how, and how much, parents may attempt to shape their children depend on what the moral project of parenthood is all about. A great deal has been written in the past forty years on the moral functions of parents and families and the acquisition and character of parental duties and rights. There has also been a great deal of philosophical writing on the use of technologies to create, select, and modify children, with such seminal works as (...)
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  12.  2
    Responsibility From the Margins by David Shoemaker.Robin Zheng - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):9-17.
    David Shoemaker's highly innovative and intricately argued new book brings much of his previous work together with substantial original material to form a detailed and cohesive treatment of responsibility. The book is engaging, crisp, and admirably clear. It is marvelously ambitious in its strategy and framework, engagement with multiple literatures, and decidedly novel approach to Strawsonian theory. Moral philosophers, psychologists, clinicians and practitioners, and anyone who has ever wondered about "marginal agents"—people with dementia, autism, depression, OCD, and psychopathy—will find much (...)
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  13. Editorial Note.Rebecca Kukla - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):ix-xi.
    How can we conceptualize and promote agential choices in a complicated social world—one in which institutional, cultural, and marketing pressures convey values and norms that may not be in the best interest of individual patients? In this issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, Eric Racine and his colleagues explore this difficult question in the context of “preclinical” Alzheimer’s disease and complementary and alternative medicines. This is an especially murky and vexed context in which to think about patient agency, (...)
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  14.  4
    The Duty to Rescue and Investigators' Obligations.Douglas MacKay & Tina Rulli - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):71-105.
    The duty to rescue is a highly plausible and powerful ethical principle. It requires agents to assist others in extreme need in cases where doing so does not conflict with some weighty moral aim; requires little personal sacrifice; and is likely to significantly benefit the recipients.1 As a general obligation, it binds all persons simply qua persons, and it is owed to all persons simply qua persons. Clinical investigators working in low-income countries frequently encounter sick or destitute people to whom (...)
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  15.  3
    Becoming Human: The Ontogenesis, Metaphysics, and Expression of Human Emotionality by Jennifer Greenwood.Odenbaugh Jay - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):1-4.
    Becoming Human by Jennifer Greenwood is one of the most thought-provoking books on emotion and its expression I have read. At its core, it attempts to provide an account of the development of full human emotionality and in so doing argues the emotions are “transcranial.” Emotions are radically realized outside our nervous systems and beyond our skin. As children, we are functionally integrated affectively with our mothers; so much so that in a sense our emotions are not ours alone. Regardless (...)
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  16.  2
    Contextualized Autonomy and Liberalism: Broadening the Lenses on Complementary and Alternative Medicines in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease.Eric Racine, John Aspler, Cynthia Forlini & Jennifer A. Chandler - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):1-41.
    Concerns about the possibility of a sharp rise in the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in Western nations have led to both the significant deployment of resources and the development of national research and healthcare plans. Although often focused on treatment, substantial efforts have also been dedicated toward preventing or delaying AD onset. As a result, recent technological and biomedical advances have greatly improved the understanding of AD pathophysiology. While some new tests can assess only risk ), some tests for certain (...)
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  17.  1
    Public Reasoning and Health-Care Priority Setting: The Case of NICE.Benedict Rumbold, Albert Weale, Annette Rid, James Wilson & Peter Littlejohns - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):107-134.
    Health systems that provide for universal patient access through a scheme of prepayments—whether through taxes, social insurance, or a combination of the two—need to make decisions on the scope of coverage that they secure. Such decisions are inherently controversial, implying, as they do, that some patients will receive less than comprehensive health care, or less than complete protection from the financial consequences of ill-heath, even when there is a clinically effective therapy to which they might have access.Controversial decisions of this (...)
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  18.  1
    Death or Disability: The Carmentis Machine and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children by Dominic Wilkinson.Wasserman David - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):4-11.
    Dominic Wilkinson, a neonatal physician and medical ethicist, has written a searching, moving, and philosophically sophisticated book about the ethics of life and death decision making in the neonatal intensive care unit. Although I will devote much of this review to criticism, I want to say at the outset that Death or Disability represents interdisciplinary work at its very best. Wilkinson’s exposition is both rich in detail and uncompromising in its ethical analysis. He spares the reader none of the clinical, (...)
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  19. Guardianship and Clinical Research Participation: The Case of Wards with Disorders of Consciousness.Megan S. Wright, Michael R. Ulrich & Joseph J. Fins - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):43-70.
    Incapacitated adults with a legally appointed guardian or conservator may be recruited for or involved with medical, behavioral, or social science research. Much of the research in which such persons participate is aimed at evaluating medical interventions for them, or contributing to general knowledge about disorders from which they may suffer. In this paper we will consider how the appointment of guardians for patients with disorders of consciousness —severe brain injuries that affect a patient’s level of arousal and ability to (...)
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  20.  13
    Trump is Gross: Taking the Politics of Taste (and Distaste) Seriously.Shelley M. Park - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal.
    This paper advances the somewhat unphilosophical thesis that “Trump is gross” to draw attention to the need to take matters of taste seriously in politics. I begin by exploring the slipperiness of distinctions between aesthetics, epistemology, and ethics, subsequently suggesting that we may need to pivot toward the aesthetic to understand and respond to the historical moment we inhabit. More specically, I suggest that, in order to understand how Donald Trump was elected President of the United States and in order (...)
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