Locke Studies

ISSN: 1476-0290

6 found

View year:

  1. The Reception of John Locke’s Writings at Christ Church, Oxford, c. 1690–1800.Jacob Donald Chatterjee - 2023 - Locke Studies 23:1-34.
    This article presents some overlooked evidence on the reception of John Locke’s writings at Christ Church, Oxford. It is intended to supplement a new article in the History of Universities on the surprisingly positive response to Locke’s Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689) at that bastion of late seventeenth-century high churchmanship. This evidence sheds new light on: the reception of Epicureanism at that college in the 1650s; Locke’s personal connections at Christ Church; book-holdings of Locke’s writings at the early eighteenth-century college; (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  40
    A Review of Locke on Persons and Personal Identity by Ruth Boeker. [REVIEW]Joshua Harry Haywood - 2023 - Locke Studies 23:1-4.
    A review of Ruth Boeker's recent book Locke on Persons and Personal Identity (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  17
    Locke on Prerogative.Philipp Schönegger & Henrik Sætra - 2023 - Locke Studies 23:1-26.
    John Locke’s role in the advent of modernity has been debated widely. His work has been (ab)used by those arguing from libertarian, democratic, communitarian, socialist, feminist, or postcolonial points of view, either portraying him as a forefather of their preferred political theory or as an antagonist to their avowed political and philosophical goals. In this paper, we are primarily concerned with highlighting the importance of the executive’s prerogative in Locke’s philosophy, as we argue that this concept, often banished to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  31
    Sameness, Persons, and the Resurrection.Anita van der Bos - 2023 - Locke Studies 23:1-19.
    According to Locke, scripture says nothing about the resurrection of the same body. We will be resurrected. But in what sense can resurrected Jane be the “same” as living Jane? Throughout his thinking, Locke holds that sameness of body and/or sameness of soul are not required for the resurrection of “the same Jane.” Sameness of person is required. Locke’s theory of personal identity was ground-breaking in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It was provoking and resulted in a wave of critical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  15
    Locke, Active Power, and a Puzzle about Ascription.Joshua Wood - 2023 - Locke Studies 23:1-23.
    Locke holds that the experience of voluntary action is the sole origin of the concept of causal power. What is it about this experience that compels Locke to draw this conclusion? I think this question should puzzle scholars a great deal more than it has. There are three existing interpretations of Locke’s position. The first explanation holds that Locke appeals to voluntary action because he takes this experience to reveal a necessary connection between volition and action; the second holds that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  37
    Wholly Useless and Unserviceable to Knowledge.David Https://Orcidorg Wörner - 2023 - Locke Studies 23:1-29.
    In this paper I examine Locke’s criticism of the view that some species of natural objects are determined by real essences, a view I call species realism. Most commentators have focused either on Locke’s putative objections to the realist’s claim that species determining real essences exist or on his semantic case against the assumption that our species terms can refer to real essences that determine species. I identify another objection, which, I argue, is independent from both of these lines of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues