38 found

Year:

  1.  59
    Peter Berkowitz, Nietzsche: The Ethics of An Immoralist. [REVIEW]Christa Davis Acampora - 1997 - Man and World 30 (4):490-496.
  2.  9
    Critique of the Unconscious: Kantian Influences in the Works of Lucian Blaga. [REVIEW]George G. Constandache - 1997 - Man and World 30 (4):445-452.
    Lucian Blaga was the creator of a speculative and metaphoric philosophical system that placed mystery at its very core. Mystery, according to Blaga, veils existence and represents both a stimulus and a brake for human knowledge. His articulation of this view is strongly indebted to Kant, whose transcendental philosophy he sought to extend by critically examining the forms of sensibility and categories of the understanding, not so much in relation to consciousness, but as they are duplicated, or doubled, in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  20
    Brice R. Wachterhauser: Hermeneutics and Truth. [REVIEW]Paul Fairfield - 1997 - Man and World 30 (4):500-504.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  16
    Marlène Zarander, La dette impensáe: Heidegger et l'héritage hébraïque.Wayne J. Froman - 1997 - Man and World 30 (4):497-500.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  43
    Platonism and Metaphor in the Texts of Mathematics: GöDel and Frege on Mathematical Knowledge. [REVIEW]Clevis Headley - 1997 - Man and World 30 (4):453-481.
    In this paper, I challenge those interpretations of Frege that reinforce the view that his talk of grasping thoughts about abstract objects is consistent with Russell's notion of acquaintance with universals and with Gödel's contention that we possess a faculty of mathematical perception capable of perceiving the objects of set theory. Here I argue the case that Frege is not an epistemological Platonist in the sense in which Gödel is one. The contention advanced is that Gödel bases his Platonism on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  44
    Dual and Non-Dual Ontology in Satre and MahāyāNa Buddhism.Derek K. Heyman - 1997 - Man and World 30 (4):431-443.
    This paper examines Sartre's dualistic ontology in the light of the non-duality asserted by Mahayana Buddhism. In the first section, I show, against the objection of Hazel E. Barnes, that Sartre and Buddhism have comparable theories of consciousness. The second section discusses Steven W. Laycock's use of Zen philosophy to solve the Sartrean metaphysical problem regarding the origin of being for-itself. This solution involves rejecting the ontological priority of being in-itself in favor of the Buddhist understanding of interdependent origination (pratitya-samutpada) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  8
    William Maker, Philosophy Without Foundations: Rethinking Hegel. [REVIEW]David Ingram - 1997 - Man and World 30 (4):483-489.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  27
    L. Brisson and F. Meyerstein: Inventing the Universe. [REVIEW]Pierre Kerszberg - 1997 - Man and World 30 (4):505-508.
  9.  70
    Heidegger's Formal Indication: A Question of Method in Being and Time. [REVIEW]Ryan Streeter - 1997 - Man and World 30 (4):413-430.
    For Heidegger, phenomenological investigation is carried out by formal indication, the name given to the methodical approach he assumes in Being and Time. This paper attempts to draw attention to the nature of formal indication in light of the fact that it has been largely lost upon American scholarship (mainly due to its inconsistent translation). The roots of the concept of formal indication are shown in two ways. First, its thematic treatment in Heidegger's 1921/22 Winter Semester course, Phenomenological Investigations into (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  10.  23
    Hermeneutics and the Natural Sciences.Robert P. Crease - 1997 - Man and World 30 (3):259-270.
  11.  34
    Achievements of the Hermeneutic-Phenomenological Approach to Natural Science A Comparison with Constructivist Sociology.Martin Eger - 1997 - Man and World 30 (3):343-367.
    The hermeneutic-phenomenological approach to the natural sciences has a special interest in the interpretive phases of these sciences and in the circumstances, cognitive and social, that lead to divergent as well as convergent interpretations. It tries to ascertain the role of the hermeneutic circle in research; and to this end it has developed, over the past three decades or so, a number of adaptations of hermeneutic and phenomenological concepts to processes of experimentation and theory-making. The purpose of the present essay (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  12. The Responsive Order: A New Empiricism. [REVIEW]E. T. Gendlin - 1997 - Man and World 30 (3):383-411.
    The uniqueness of logic is upheld and contrasted with twenty roles of a wider responsive order that includes us and our procedures. Empirical responses are precise, but different in different approaches. Procedures and findings are independent of (not separable from) their concepts. Two-way feedback obviates a top-down derivation of findings from assumptions, hypotheses, history, or language. The postmodern problems of interpretation, conditions of appearances and relativism involve the ancient error of making perception the model-instance of experience. Instead, bodily interaction functions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13.  27
    Understanding Sustainability.Bart Gremmen & Josette Jacobs - 1997 - Man and World 30 (3):315-327.
    Proposed solutions to sustainability often bring different economic sectors into conflict; when a sustainable solution for one sector is non-sustainable for another it creates what we call the dilemma of sustainability. A recent example took place in the Columbia Basin of the Pacific Northwest, involving competing notions of sustainability by fisheries and the energy industry. Taking up some ideas of Eger and Lyotard, we criticize the constructivist approach which treats large ecosystems as constructions and the process of resolving conflicts of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  45
    Why a Hermeneutical Philosophy of the Natural Sciences?Patrick A. Heelan - 1997 - Man and World 30 (3):271-298.
    Why a hermeneutical philosophy of the natural sciences? It is necessary to address the philosophic crisis of realism vs relativism in the natural sciences. This crisis is seen as a part of the cultural crisis that Husserl and Heidegger identified and attributed to the hegemonic role of theoretical and calculative thought in Western societies. The role of theory is addressed using the hermeneutical circle to probe the origin of theoretic meaning in scientific cultural praxes. This is studied in Galileo's discovery (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  15.  23
    Thingly Hermeneutics/Technoconstructions.Don Ihde - 1997 - Man and World 30 (3):369-381.
    Within the Euro-American community of philosophers relating hermeneutics to science there is a considerable disagreement about where hermeneutics may be located. The older traditions hold that hermeneutics apply to and are limited to the social, cultural, and historical dimensions of science. But newer approaches claim that hermeneutics applies to the very praxis of science and to the constitution of scientific objects. This paper sides with the latter perspective and argues that a tendency to retain vestigial positivist interpretations of science keeps (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  33
    A Hermeneutics of the Natural Sciences? The Debate Updated.Theodore Kisiel - 1997 - Man and World 30 (3):329-341.
    The initial obstacle to the development of a hermeneutics of the natural sciences has been the inadequate translation, and thus misunderstanding, of the basic terms of Heidegger's ontological analysis ofthe protopractical human situation and its progressive technicization. Pragmatism's parallel analyses of the problem situation of scientists has promoted a more idiomatically English vocabulary. But 1) Gadamer's exclusion of domains and disciplines working with technical methods from his universal hermeneutics continues to be influential, this in spite of the genesis of his (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  38
    On the Hermeneutical Nature of Modern Natural Science.Joseph J. Kockelmans - 1997 - Man and World 30 (3):299-313.
    An effort is made in this essay to show the intrinsic hermeneutic nature of the natural sciences by means of a critical reflection on data taken from the history of classical mechanics and astronomy. The events which eventually would lead to the origin of Newton's mechanics are critically analyzed, with the aim of showing that and in what sense the natural sciences are essentially interpretive enterprises.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  28
    Margolis and the Philosophy of History.David Carr - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):139-144.
  19.  19
    Margolis on Interpretation.Edward S. Casey - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):127-138.
  20. Highway Bridges and Feasts: Heidegger and Borgmann on How to Affirm Technology. [REVIEW]Hubert L. Dreyus & Charles Spinosa - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):159-178.
    Borgmann's views seem to clarify and elaborate Heidegger's. Both thinkers understand technology as a way of coping with people and things that reveals them, viz. makes them intelligible. Both thinkers also claim that technological coping could devastate not only our environment and communal ties but more importantly the historical, world-opening being that has defined Westerners since the Greeks. Both think that this devastation can be prevented by attending to the practices for coping with simple things like family meals and footbridges. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  21.  37
    The Bacchanalian Revel: Hegel and Deconstruction.Andrew Haas - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):217-226.
    This text argues that Hegel's Concept, insofar as it has already deconstructed all opposed and fixed standpoints, supersedes deconstruction. Reducing the Logic and Phenomenology to the same kind of schematic formalism for which Hegel criticized his predecessors (Fichte and Schelling), Derrida misses the ways in which Absolute Spirit shows itself as the bacchanalian revel wherein no member is not drunk. Thus, this article defends Hegel against Derrida on Derrida's terms.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. The New Translation of Sein Und Zeit: A Grammatological Lexicographer's Commentary. [REVIEW]Theodore Kisiel - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):239-258.
  23.  18
    Remarks on History and Interpretation: Replies to Casey, Carr and Rockmore. [REVIEW]Joseph Margolis - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):151-157.
  24.  13
    Margolis and the Historical Turn.Tom Rockmore - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):145-149.
  25.  31
    "Let a Hundred Translations Bloom!" A Modest Proposal About Being and Time.Thomas Sheehan - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):227-238.
  26.  47
    The Origins and Crisis of Continental Philosophy.Anthony J. Steinbock - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):199-215.
    When contemporary continental philosophy dismisses, with the discourse of post-modernism, the role of origin, teleology, foundation, etc., it is forsaking its own style of thinking and as a consequence is no longer able to discern crises of lived-meaning or to engage in the transformation of historical life. I address this crisis by characterizing continental philosophy as a particular style of thinking, generative thinking. I then examine the meaning and origins of philosophical thinking by drawing, for strategic reasons, on Jacques Derrida's (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  8
    “This Project is Mad”: Descartes, Derrida, and the Notion of Philosophical Crisis. [REVIEW]Gary Steiner - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):179-198.
    In “Cogito and the History of Madness,” Derrida maintains that crisis is endemic to philosophy rather than being, as Husserl forcefully argued, a temporary condition that can and must be overcome through the resources of reason. A reflection on the place of madness in Descartes's Meditations serves as the point of departure for demonstrating that Derrida has done an injustice to philosophy; and a comparison of Derrida's views with the thought of Husserl, Heidegger, and Nietzsche reveals that Derrida's position in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  5
    “Im Anfang liegt alles beschlossen”: Hannah Arendts politisches Denken im Schatten eines Heideggerschen Problems.Grossmann Andreas - 1997 - Man and World 30 (1):35-47.
    The article seeks to understand Hannah Arendt's political thinking by relating it to an issue which is crucial to the thinking of the later Heidegger, i.e., the problem of originality and history. In opposition to Hegel's thesis of the “end of art,” Heidegger envisages in “great art” such as Hölderlin's poetry a new origin of thinking and history. The end of art, which Hegel holds to be necessary, is in Heidegger's view to be overcome precisely because art, for him, entails (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  8
    “Im Anfang Liegt Alles Beschlossen”: Hannah Arendts Politisches Denken Im Schatten Eines Heideggerschen Problems. [REVIEW]Andreas Grossmann - 1997 - Man and World 30 (1):35-47.
    The article seeks to understand Hannah Arendt's political thinking by relating it to an issue which is crucial to the thinking of the later Heidegger, i.e., the problem of originality ( Anfänglichkeit) and history. In opposition to Hegel's thesis of the “end of art,” Heidegger envisages in “great art” such as Hölderlin's poetry a new origin of thinking and history. The end of art, which Hegel holds to be necessary, is in Heidegger's view to be overcome precisely because art, for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  24
    James L. Marsh: Critique, Action, and Liberation. [REVIEW]Steven Hendley - 1997 - Man and World 30 (1):122-126.
  31.  96
    The Progression and Regression of Slave Morality in Nietzsche's Genealogy: The Moralization of Bad Conscience and Indebtedness. [REVIEW]David Lindstedt - 1997 - Man and World 30 (1):83-105.
    With the advent of slave morality and the belief system it entails, human beings alone begin to advance to a level beyond that of simple, brute, animal nature. While Christianity and its belief system generate a progression, however, allowing human beings to become interesting for the first time, Nietzsche also maintains in the Genealogy that slave morality is a regression, somehow lowering or bringing them down from a possible higher level. In this paper I will argue that this is not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  35
    Levinas, Substitution and Transcendental Subjectivity.Philip J. Maloney - 1997 - Man and World 30 (1):49-64.
    The task of this paper is to clarify the status and implications of Levinas's insistence on the necessity of subjectivity to the ethical relation. Focusing in particular on the discussion of substitution in Otherwise than Being, it is argued that the description of subjectivity as substitution enables Levinas to articulate the necessity of the subject to the approach of the other in a manner which avoids the transcendental character which such claims to necessity usually embody. This argument proceeds from an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  16
    Ronald E. Santoni: Bad Faith, Good Faith. [REVIEW]Phyllis Sutton Morris - 1997 - Man and World 30 (1):115-122.
  34.  15
    Remembrances of Werner Marx.Tom Nenon - 1997 - Man and World 30 (1):1-3.
  35. Husserl's Debate with Heidegger in the Margins of Kant and the Problem of Metaphysics.Richard E. Palmer - 1997 - Man and World 30 (1):5-33.
    Husserl received from Martin Heidegger a copy of his Kant and the Problem of Metaphysics in the summer of 1929 not long before Husserl had determined to reread Heidegger's writings in order to arrive at a definitive position on Heidegger's philosophy. With this in view, Husserl reread and made extensive marginal comments in Being and Time and Kant and the Problem of Metaphysics. This essay by the translator of the remarks in KPM offers some historical background and comment on the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  20
    An Interview with John Sallis: Double Truths. [REVIEW]Outi Pasanen - 1997 - Man and World 30 (1):107-114.
  37.  35
    Given Time and the Gift of Life.John Protevi - 1997 - Man and World 30 (1):65-82.
    Given Time and the Gift of Life explores the following nexus in Derrida's thought: the gift, the mother, and life. The first section examines life within the trajectory of the gift, the excess of gift over return in the gift of life, and the rewriting of Aristotelian generation in differantial species-being. The second section shows the quasi-transcendental nature of Derrida's thought. The conclusion sketches some of the political consequences of the gift of life thought as the quasi-transcendental gift of differantial (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Ronald E. Santoni, Bad Faith, Good Faith, and Authenticity in Sartre's Early Philosophy.P. Sutton Morris - 1997 - Man and World 30:115-112.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues