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  1.  3
    Online Identity Crisis Identity Issues in Online Communities.Selene Arfini, Lorenzo Botta Parandera, Camilla Gazzaniga, Nicolò Maggioni & Alessandro Tacchino - 2021 - Minds and Machines 31 (1):193-212.
    How have online communities affected the ways their users construct, view, and define their identity? In this paper, we will approach this issue by considering two philosophical sets of problems related to personal identity: the “Characterization Question” and the “Self-Other Relations Question.” Since these queries have traditionally brought out different problems around the concept of identity, here we aim at rethinking them in the framework of online communities. To do so, we will adopt an externalist and cognitive point of view (...)
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  2.  5
    Correction To: Online Identity Crisis: Identity Issues in Online Communities.Selene Arfni, Lorenzo Botta Parandera, Camilla Gazzaniga, Nicolò Maggioni & Alessandro Tacchino - 2021 - Minds and Machines 31 (1):213-213.
    An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article.
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  3.  63
    The Machine Scenario: A Computational Perspective on Alternative Representations of Indeterminism.Vincent Grandjean & Matteo Pascucci - 2021 - Minds and Machines 31 (1):59-74.
    In philosophical logic and metaphysics there is a long-standing debate around the most appropriate structures to represent indeterministic scenarios concerning the future. We reconstruct here such a debate in a computational setting, focusing on the fundamental difference between moment-based and history-based structures. Our presentation is centered around two versions of an indeterministic scenario in which a programmer wants a machine to perform a given task at some point after a specified time. One of the two versions includes an assumption about (...)
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  4.  27
    Algorithmic Fairness in Mortgage Lending: From Absolute Conditions to Relational Trade-Offs.Michelle Seng Ah Lee & Luciano Floridi - 2021 - Minds and Machines 31 (1):165-191.
    To address the rising concern that algorithmic decision-making may reinforce discriminatory biases, researchers have proposed many notions of fairness and corresponding mathematical formalizations. Each of these notions is often presented as a one-size-fits-all, absolute condition; however, in reality, the practical and ethical trade-offs are unavoidable and more complex. We introduce a new approach that considers fairness—not as a binary, absolute mathematical condition—but rather, as a relational notion in comparison to alternative decisionmaking processes. Using US mortgage lending as an example use (...)
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  5.  5
    Information and Diagrammatic Reasoning: An Inferentialist Reading.Bruno Ramos Mendonça - 2021 - Minds and Machines 31 (1):99-120.
    In current philosophy of information, different authors have been supporting the veridicality thesis. According to this thesis, an epistemically-oriented concept of information must have truth as one of its necessary conditions. Two challenges can be raised against VT. First, some philosophers object that veridicalists erroneously ignore the informativeness of false messages. Secondly, it is not clear whether VT can adequately explain the information considered in hypothetical reasoning. In this sense, logical diagrams offer an interesting case of analysis: by manipulating a (...)
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  6.  9
    Descriptive Complexity, Computational Tractability, and the Logical and Cognitive Foundations of Mathematics.Markus Pantsar - 2021 - Minds and Machines 31 (1):75-98.
    In computational complexity theory, decision problems are divided into complexity classes based on the amount of computational resources it takes for algorithms to solve them. In theoretical computer science, it is commonly accepted that only functions for solving problems in the complexity class P, solvable by a deterministic Turing machine in polynomial time, are considered to be tractable. In cognitive science and philosophy, this tractability result has been used to argue that only functions in P can feasibly work as computational (...)
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  7.  10
    The Computational Origin of Representation.Steven T. Piantadosi - 2021 - Minds and Machines 31 (1):1-58.
    Each of our theories of mental representation provides some insight into how the mind works. However, these insights often seem incompatible, as the debates between symbolic, dynamical, emergentist, sub-symbolic, and grounded approaches to cognition attest. Mental representations—whatever they are—must share many features with each of our theories of representation, and yet there are few hypotheses about how a synthesis could be possible. Here, I develop a theory of the underpinnings of symbolic cognition that shows how sub-symbolic dynamics may give rise (...)
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  8.  11
    Synthetic Deliberation: Can Emulated Imagination Enhance Machine Ethics?Robert Pinka - 2021 - Minds and Machines 31 (1):121-136.
    Artificial intelligence is becoming increasingly entwined with our daily lives: AIs work as assistants through our phones, control our vehicles, and navigate our vacuums. As these objects become more complex and work within our societies in ways that affect our well-being, there is a growing demand for machine ethics—we want a guarantee that the various automata in our lives will behave in a way that minimizes the amount of harm they create. Though many technologies exist as moral artifacts, the development (...)
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  9.  15
    Accountability and Control Over Autonomous Weapon Systems: A Framework for Comprehensive Human Oversight.Ilse Verdiesen, Filippo Santoni de Sio & Virginia Dignum - 2021 - Minds and Machines 31 (1):137-163.
    Accountability and responsibility are key concepts in the academic and societal debate on Autonomous Weapon Systems, but these notions are often used as high-level overarching constructs and are not operationalised to be useful in practice. “Meaningful Human Control” is often mentioned as a requirement for the deployment of Autonomous Weapon Systems, but a common definition of what this notion means in practice, and a clear understanding of its relation with responsibility and accountability is also lacking. In this paper, we present (...)
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