Minds and Machines

ISSNs: 0924-6495, 1572-8641

8 found

View year:

  1.  32
    From Monitors to Monitors: A Primitive History.Troy K. Astarte - 2024 - Minds and Machines 34 (1):51-71.
    As computers became multi-component systems in the 1950s, handling the speed differentials efficiently was identified as a major challenge. The desire for better understanding and control of ‘concurrency’ spread into hardware, software, and formalism. This paper examines the way in which the problem emerged and was handled across various computing cultures from 1955 to 1985. In the machinic culture of the late 1950s, system programs called ‘monitors’ were used for directly managing synchronisation. Attempts to reframe synchronisation in the subsequent algorithmic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  20
    A Pragmatic Theory of Computational Artefacts.Alessandro G. Buda & Giuseppe Primiero - 2024 - Minds and Machines 34 (1):139-170.
    Some computational phenomena rely essentially on pragmatic considerations, and seem to undermine the independence of the specification from the implementation. These include software development, deviant uses, esoteric languages and recent data-driven applications. To account for them, the interaction between pragmatics, epistemology and ontology in computational artefacts seems essential, indicating the need to recover the role of the language metaphor. We propose a User Levels (ULs) structure as a pragmatic complement to the Levels of Abstraction (LoAs)-based structure defining the ontology and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  37
    Limits of Optimization.Cesare Carissimo & Marcin Korecki - 2024 - Minds and Machines 34 (1):117-137.
    Optimization is about finding the best available object with respect to an objective function. Mathematics and quantitative sciences have been highly successful in formulating problems as optimization problems, and constructing clever processes that find optimal objects from sets of objects. As computers have become readily available to most people, optimization and optimized processes play a very broad role in societies. It is not obvious, however, that the optimization processes that work for mathematics and abstract objects should be readily applied to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  21
    True Turing: A Bird’s-Eye View.Edgar Daylight - 2024 - Minds and Machines 34 (1):29-49.
    Alan Turing is often portrayed as a materialist in secondary literature. In the present article, I suggest that Turing was instead an idealist, inspired by Cambridge scholars, Arthur Eddington, Ernest Hobson, James Jeans and John McTaggart. I outline Turing’s developing thoughts and his legacy in the USA to date. Specifically, I contrast Turing’s two notions of computability (both from 1936) and distinguish between Turing’s “machine intelligence” in the UK and the more well-known “artificial intelligence” in the USA. According to my (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  22
    Leibniz and the Stocking Frame: Computation, Weaving and Knitting in the 17th Century.Michael Friedman - 2024 - Minds and Machines 34 (1):11-28.
    The comparison made by Ada Lovelace in 1843 between the Analytical Engine and the Jacquard loom is one of the well-known analogies between looms and computation machines. Given the fact that weaving – and textile production in general – is one of the oldest cultural techniques in human history, the question arises whether this was the first time that such a parallel was drawn. As this paper will show, centuries before Lovelace’s analogy, such a comparison was made by Gottfried Wilhelm (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  29
    Computing Cultures: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives.Juan Luis Gastaldi - 2024 - Minds and Machines 34 (1):1-10.
  7.  10
    Three Early Formal Approaches to the Verification of Concurrent Programs.Cliff B. Jones - 2024 - Minds and Machines 34 (1):73-92.
    This paper traces a relatively linear sequence of early research approaches to the formal verification of concurrent programs. It does so forwards and then backwards in time. After briefly outlining the context, the key insights from three distinct approaches from the 1970s are identified (Ashcroft/Manna, Ashcroft (solo) and Owicki). The main technical material in the paper focuses on a specific program taken from the last published of the three pieces of research (Susan Owicki’s): her own verification of her _Findpos_ example (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  34
    Informational Equivalence but Computational Differences? Herbert Simon on Representations in Scientific Practice.David Waszek - 2024 - Minds and Machines 34 (1):93-116.
    To explain why, in scientific problem solving, a diagram can be “worth ten thousand words,” Jill Larkin and Herbert Simon (1987) relied on a computer model: two representations can be “informationally” equivalent but differ “computationally,” just as the same data can be encoded in a computer in multiple ways, more or less suited to different kinds of processing. The roots of this proposal lay in cognitive psychology, more precisely in the “imagery debate” of the 1970s on whether there are image-like (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues