19 found

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  1. More Than a Decade On: Mapping Today’s Regulatory and Policy Landscapes Following the Publication of Nanoscience and Nanotechnologies: Opportunities and Uncertainties.M. Bowman Diana - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (2):169-186.
    It is now more than a decade since the release of the Royal Society and Royal Academy of Engineering’s seminal report on nanosciences and nanotechnologies. The report, for the first time, brought together the spectrum of scientific and societal issues underpinning the emergence of the technology. In articulating 21 recommendations, the RA/RAEng provided the United Kingdom Government—and others—with an agenda on how they could, and should, deal with the disparate aspects of the technology. The report provides a baseline to measure (...)
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  2. Staff’s Views From One Canadian Organ Procurement Organization on Organ Donation and Organ Transplant Technologies: A Content Analysis.Jennifer Cheung & Gregor Wolbring - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (2):187-202.
    Advancements in scientific research and technological development influence the practice of organ donation and organ transplantation. Many SRTD governance discourses put forward the need for multi-stakeholder engagements. We posit that staff employed by organ procurement organizations have a stake in the discussions around SRTD applicable to ODOT because SRTD is one factor that shapes ODOT and because staff are involved in ODOT education and awareness raising while acting as a nexus between donors and the public. Therefore, we performed a content (...)
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  3.  3
    Whose Future is It Anyway?Christopher Coenen - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (2):123-126.
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  4. Futures Perfect and Visioneering: A Re-Assessment.William Patrick McCray - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (2):203-207.
    In this essay, I review the concept of visioneering as I developed it and consider the ways in which other scholars have deployed it.
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  5. Nanoethics, Science Communication, and a Fourth Model for Public Engagement.Miah Andy - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (2):139-152.
    This paper develops a fourth model of public engagement with science, grounded in the principle of nurturing scientific agency through participatory bioethics. It argues that social media is an effective device through which to enable such engagement, as it has the capacity to empower users and transforms audiences into co-producers of knowledge, rather than consumers of content. Social media also fosters greater engagement with the political and legal implications of science, thus promoting the value of scientific citizenship. This argument is (...)
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  6.  3
    Building Better Humans? Refocusing the Debate on Transhumanism.Devan Stahl - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (2):209-212.
  7. Creating Golems: Uses of Golem Stories in the Ethics of Technologies.Thorstensen Erik - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (2):153-168.
    People tell stories. In stories, the narrator and the receiver can perceive meanings. These meanings can be analyzed again through larger interpretative framings. In this article, different ethical uses of the golem story are analyzed by making use of some of Jörn Rüsen’s ideas concerning historical thinking and narration and with a focus on the uses of the golem myth in studies and discussions on new and emerging science and technology.
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  8.  1
    Reflection as a Deliberative and Distributed Practice: Assessing Neuro-Enhancement Technologies Via Mutual Learning Exercises.Hub Zwart, Jonna Brenninkmeijer, Peter Eduard, Lotte Krabbenborg, Sheena Laursen, Gema Revuelta & Winnie Toonders - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (2):127-138.
    In 1968, Jürgen Habermas claimed that, in an advanced technological society, the emancipatory force of knowledge can only be regained by actively recovering the ‘forgotten experience of reflection’. In this article, we argue that, in the contemporary situation, critical reflection requires a deliberative ambiance, a process of mutual learning, a consciously organised process of deliberative and distributed reflection. And this especially applies, we argue, to critical reflection concerning a specific subset of technologies which are actually oriented towards optimising human cognition. (...)
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  9. Changing Me Softly: Making Sense of Soft Regulation and Compliance in the Italian Nanotechnology Sector.Simone Arnaldi - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):3-16.
    Soft regulation has increased its importance in science and technology governance. Despite such indisputable significance, the literature on technology policy and regulation so far seems to have dedicated only a limited attention to a systematic understanding of the factors affecting compliance with these soft rules. This article addresses this limitation. By way of a literature scoping exercise, we propose a taxonomy of the mechanisms affecting compliance with soft regulation. We subsequently apply the taxonomy as a guide to examine the opinions (...)
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  10.  2
    Ethical Assessment of Emerging Technologies. Appraising the Moral Plausibility of Technological Visions. [REVIEW]Rosangela Barcaro - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):17-18.
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  11.  2
    Guiding Orientation Processes as Possibility to Give Direction for System Innovations—the Use of Resilience and Sustainability in the Energy Transition.Urte Brand & Arnim von Gleich - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):31-45.
    Challenges like finite fossil fuels, impacts of climate change, and risks of nuclear energy require a transformation of energy systems which implies risks itself, e.g. technical or socio-economic risks or still unknown and unexpected surprises. Nevertheless, in order to follow the direction desired by the transformation, the question arises how the direction of the transformation processes of socio-technical energy systems can be influenced. Guiding orientation processes could represent such a possibility to give direction where desired directions are taken up with (...)
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  12. Visions Making Sense of the Present and Co-Creating the Future.Coenen Christopher - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):1-2.
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  13.  1
    The Logic of Digital Utopianism.Sascha Dickel & Jan-Felix Schrape - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):47-58.
    With the Internet’s integration into mainstream society, online technologies have become a significant economic factor and a central aspect of everyday life. Thus, it is not surprising that news providers and social scientists regularly offer media-induced visions of a nearby future and that these horizons of expectation are continually expanding. This is true not only for the Web as a traditional media technology but also for 3D printing, which has freed modern media utopianism from its stigma of immateriality. Our article (...)
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  14. One Site—Multiple Visions: Visioneering Between Contrasting Actors’ Perspectives.Franziska Engels, Anna Verena Münch & Dagmar Simon - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):59-74.
    Visions of and narratives about the future energy system influence the actual creation of innovations and are thus accompanying the current energy transition. Particularly in times of change and uncertainty, visions gain crucial relevance: imagining possible futures impacts the current social reality by both creating certain spaces of action and shaping technical artifacts. However, different actors may express divergent visions of the future energy system and its implementation. Looking at a particular innovation site involving multiple stakeholders over an 8-year period, (...)
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  15.  2
    How Smart Grid Meets In Vitro Meat: On Visions as Socio-Epistemic Practices.Arianna Ferrari & Andreas Lösch - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):75-91.
    The production, manipulation and exploitation of future visions are increasingly important elements in practices of visioneering socio-technical processes of innovation and transformation. This becomes obvious in new and emerging science and technologies and large-scale transformations of established socio-technical systems. A variety of science and technology studies provide evidence on correlations between expectations and anticipatory practices with the dynamics of such processes of change. Technology assessment responded to the challenges posed by the influence of visions on the processes by elaborating methodologies (...)
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  16.  4
    Into Blue Skies—a Transdisciplinary Foresight and Co-Creation Method for Adding Robustness to Visioneering.Gudowsky Niklas & Sotoudeh Mahshid - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):93-106.
    Expectations play a distinctive role in shaping emerging technologies and producing hype cycles when a technology is adopted or fails on the market. To harness expectations, facilitate and provoke forward-looking discussions, and identify policy alternatives, futures studies are required. Here, expert anticipation of possible or probable future developments becomes extremely arbitrary beyond short-term prediction, and the results of futures studies are often controversial, divergent, or even contradictory; thus they are contested. Nevertheless, such socio-technical imaginaries may prescribe a future that seems (...)
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  17.  1
    The Vision of “Industrie 4.0” in the Making—a Case of Future Told, Tamed, and Traded.Sabine Pfeiffer - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):107-121.
    Since industrial trade fair Hannover Messe 2011, the term “Industrie 4.0” has ignited a vision of a new Industrial Revolution and has been inspiring a lively, ongoing debate among the German public about the future of work, and hence society, ever since. The discourse around this vision of the future eventually spread to other countries, with public awareness reaching a temporary peak in 2016 when the World Economic Forum’s meeting in Davos was held with the motto “Mastering the Fourth Industrial (...)
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  18.  1
    Visioneering Socio-Technical Innovations — a Missing Piece of the Puzzle.Martin Sand & Christoph Schneider - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):19-29.
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  19.  1
    Review Of: Ethics in Technology: A Philosophical Study: Topi Heikkerö 2012 (Lanham MD, Lexington Books) ISBN 978073995918. 246 Pp. [REVIEW]Giovanni De Grandis - 2017 - NanoEthics:1-4.
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