29 found

Year:

  1.  5
    Rethinking Human Enhancement: Social Enhancement and Emergent Technologies.Francesco Paolo Adorno - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):247-250.
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  2.  1
    Responsibility and Human Enhancement.Simone Arnaldi - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):251-255.
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  3.  2
    Retooling Techno-Moral Scenarios. A Revisited Technique for Exploring Alternative Regimes of Responsibility for Human Enhancement.Simone Arnaldi - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):283-300.
    The techno-moral scenarios approach has been developed to explore the interplay between technology, society and morality. Focused on new and emerging sciences and technologies, techno-moral scenarios can be used to inform and enhance public deliberation on the desirability of socio-technical trajectories. The article presents an attempt to hybridise this scenario tool, complementing the focus on ethics with an explicit acknowledgement of the multiple meanings of responsibility and of the plurality of its regimes, i.e. the institutional arrangements presiding over the assumption (...)
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  4.  4
    “Just Carbon”: Ideas About Graphene Risks by Graphene Researchers and Innovation Advisors.Rickard Arvidsson, Max Boholm, Mikael Johansson & Monica Lindh de Montoya - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):199-210.
    Graphene is a nanomaterial with many promising and innovative applications, yet early studies indicate that graphene may pose risks to humans and the environment. According to ideas of responsible research and innovation, all relevant actors should strive to reduce risks related to technological innovations. Through semi-structured interviews, we investigated the idea of graphene as a risk held by two types of key actors: graphene researchers and innovation advisors at universities, where the latter are facilitating the movement of graphene from the (...)
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  5.  2
    Giving Voice to Patients: Developing a Discussion Method to Involve Patients in Translational Research.Marianne Boenink, Lieke van der Scheer, Elisa Garcia & Simone van der Burg - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):181-197.
    Biomedical research policy in recent years has often tried to make such research more ‘translational’, aiming to facilitate the transfer of insights from research and development to health care for the benefit of future users. Involving patients in deliberations about and design of biomedical research may increase the quality of R&D and of resulting innovations and thus contribute to translation. However, patient involvement in biomedical research is not an easy feat. This paper discusses the development of a method for involving (...)
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  6.  5
    Visions of In Vitro Meat Among Experts and Stakeholders.Inge Böhm, Arianna Ferrari & Silvia Woll - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):211-224.
    In vitro meat is presented by innovators as the most realistic and sustainable solution to the problems of current meat production and consumption. The innovators argue that in vitro meat could be more environmentally friendly, animal friendly, healthier, and safer than conventional meat. The paper elaborates different reactions of experts and stakeholders from science, civil society, economy, and politics to the innovators’ reasoning. The semi-structured interviews were conducted for the project “Visions of in vitro meat. Analysis of technical and societal (...)
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  7. Giving Voice to Patients: Developing a Discussion Method to Involve Patients in Translational Research.Simone Burg, Elisa Garcia, Lieke Scheer & Marianne Boenink - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):181-197.
    Biomedical research policy in recent years has often tried to make such research more ‘translational’, aiming to facilitate the transfer of insights from research and development to health care for the benefit of future users. Involving patients in deliberations about and design of biomedical research may increase the quality of R&D and of resulting innovations and thus contribute to translation. However, patient involvement in biomedical research is not an easy feat. This paper discusses the development of a method for involving (...)
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  8.  1
    Improving Responsibility, Responsible Improvements.Christopher Coenen - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):177-180.
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  9.  4
    Responsible Research and Innovation and the Governance of Human Enhancement.Guido Gorgoni - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):257-267.
    This article aims to explore the debate on human enhancement from the perspective of the evolutions of responsibility paradigms, and in particular from the perspective of the so-called Responsible Research and Innovation approach. The aim is not to explore the arguments pro or contra the ethical legitimacy and/or technical feasibility of human enhancement, but rather exploring if, and how, the RRI perspective can shape the debate on human enhancement.In particular, the human enhancement debate will be read through the lenses of (...)
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  10.  1
    The Over-Extended Mind? Pink Noise and the Ethics of Interaction-Dominant Systems.Darian Meacham & Miguel Prado Casanova - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):269-281.
    There is a growing recognition within cognitive enhancement and neuroethics debates of the need for greater emphasis on cognitive artefacts. This paper aims to contribute to this broadening and expansion of the cognitive-enhancement and neuroethics debates by focusing on a particular form of relation or coupling between humans and cognitive artefacts: interaction-dominance. We argue that interaction-dominance as an emergent property of some human-cognitive artefact relations has important implications for understanding the attribution and distribution of causal and other forms of responsibility (...)
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  11.  1
    Animal Disenhancement in Moral Context.Korinn N. Murphy & William P. Kabasenche - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):225-236.
    To mitigate animal suffering under industrial farming conditions, biotechnology companies are pursuing the development of genetically disenhanced animals. Recent advances in gene editing biotechnology have brought this to reality. In one of the first discussions of the ethics of disenhancement, Thompson argued that it is hard to find compelling reasons to oppose it. We offer an argument against disenhancement that draws upon parallels with human disenhancement, ecofeminism’s concern with the “logic of domination,” and a relational ethic that seeks to preserve (...)
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  12.  4
    Are Better Workers Also Better Humans? On Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement in the Workplace and Conflicting Societal Domains.Tony Pustovrh, Franc Mali & Simone Arnaldi - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):301-313.
    The article investigates the sociocultural implications of the changing modern workplace and of pharmacological cognitive enhancement as a potential adaptive tool from the viewpoint of social niche construction. We will attempt to elucidate some of the sociocultural and technological trends that drive and influence the characteristics of this specific niche, and especially to identify the kind of capabilities and adaptations that are being promoted, and to ascertain the capabilities and potentialities that might become diminished as a result. In this context, (...)
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  13.  3
    Human Enhancement and the Anthropology of the “Entire Human Being”.Richard Saage - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):237-246.
    About one and a half decades ago, two prominent reports were published in the United States which strongly influenced subsequent international discussions on the topic of human enhancement: a 2002 report on “converging technologies for improving human performance”, based on a workshop which was organised by the US National Science Foundation and the US Department of Commerce in December 2001, and the first report of US President George W. Bush’s Council on Bioethics, published in October 2003 with the title Beyond (...)
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  14. Response to Article 309.Mark Booth - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):173-175.
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  15.  3
    Models of Public Engagement: Nanoscientists’ Understandings of Science–Society Interactions.Regula Valérie Burri - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):81-98.
    This paper explores how scientists perceive public engagement initiatives. By drawing on interviews with nanoscientists, it analyzes how researchers imagine science–society interactions in an early phase of technological development. More specifically, the paper inquires into the implicit framings of citizens, of scientists, and of the public in scientists’ discourses. It identifies four different models of how nanoscientists understand public engagement which are described as educational, paternalistic, elitist, and economistic. These models are contrasted with the dialog model of public engagement promoted (...)
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  16.  2
    Assembling Upstream Engagement: The Case of the Portuguese Deliberative Forum on Nanotechnologies.António Carvalho & João Arriscado Nunes - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):99-113.
    This article analyzes a deliberative forum on nanotechnologies, organized in Portugal within the scope of the research project DEEPEN—Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies. This event included scientists, science communicators and members of the “lay public”, and resulted in a position document which summarizes collective aspirations and concerns related to nano. Drawing upon our previous experience with focus groups on nanotechnologies—characterized by methodological innovations that aimed at suspending epistemological inequalities between participants—this paper delves into the performativity of the (...)
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  17.  1
    Science, Technology and the Public.Christopher Coenen - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):79-80.
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  18. Frame Reflection Lab: A Playful Method for Frame Reflection on Synthetic Biology.Frank Kupper, Jacqueline Broerse, Anouk Heltzel & Marjoleine Meij - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):155-172.
    Synthetic biology is an emerging technology that asks for inclusive reflection on how people frame the field. To unravel how we can facilitate such reflection, this study evaluates the Frame Reflection Lab. Building upon playfulness design principles, the FRL comprises a workshop with video-narratives and co-creative group exercises. We studied how the FRL facilitated frame reflection by organizing workshops with various student groups. Analysis of 12 group conversations and 158 mini-exit surveys yielded patterns in first-order reflection as well as patterns (...)
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  19.  4
    Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products: The Challenges with Regard to Current Legal Frameworks and Consumer Exposure.Homero Pastrana, Alba Avila & Candace S. J. Tsai - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):123-137.
    Nanotechnology-enabled cosmetic products have been accessible in the market for the last 30 years. More than 250 products have been commercialized in the global market potentially exposing two billion people. These products are present in all formulations including creams, powders, lotions, and sprays. These involve contact with all body especially skin and mucosae; other tissues like airways and gastrointestinal tract can be reached by accidental exposure. Due to the size, NCPs exhibit an increased surface area volume ratio and biodistribution that (...)
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  20.  1
    Nanotechnology Governance: From Risk Regulation to Informal Platforms.Antoni Roig - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):115-121.
    Current nanotechnology regulation is focussed on risks. On the other hand, technical guidelines and other soft law tools are increasingly replacing hard law. This risk reduction approach does not seem to be fully aligned with open principles like sustainable nanotechnology. Indeed, risk optimization tends to be rather a continuous process than a way to settle ultimate lists of risks. There is therefore a need for a more dynamic view: Life cycle assessment contributes to add momentum and context to the models. (...)
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  21.  2
    The Power of Analogies for Imagining and Governing Emerging Technologies.Claudia Schwarz-Plaschg - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):139-153.
    The emergence of new technologies regularly involves comparisons with previous innovations. For instance, analogies with asbestos and genetically modified organisms have played a crucial role in the early societal debate about nanotechnology. This article explores the power of analogies in such debates and how they could be effectively and responsibly employed for imagining and governing emerging technologies in general and nanotechnology in particular. First, the concept of analogical imagination is developed to capture the explorative and anticipatory potential of analogies. Yet (...)
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  22.  1
    Frame Reflection Lab: A Playful Method for Frame Reflection on Synthetic Biology.Marjoleine G. Van der Meij, Anouk A. L. M. Heltzel, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse & Frank Kupper - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):155-172.
    Synthetic biology is an emerging technology that asks for inclusive reflection on how people frame the field. To unravel how we can facilitate such reflection, this study evaluates the Frame Reflection Lab. Building upon playfulness design principles, the FRL comprises a workshop with video-narratives and co-creative group exercises. We studied how the FRL facilitated frame reflection by organizing workshops with various student groups. Analysis of 12 group conversations and 158 mini-exit surveys yielded patterns in first-order reflection as well as patterns (...)
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  23.  4
    Discussions of Risk and New Approaches to Responsible Research and Innovation.Christopher Coenen - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (1):1-3.
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  24.  16
    Review Of: Ethics in Technology: A Philosophical Study: Topi Heikkerö 2012 (Lanham MD, Lexington Books) ISBN 978073995918. 246 Pp. [REVIEW]Giovanni De Grandis - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (1):75-78.
  25.  4
    Governing with Ignorance: Understanding the Australian Food Regulator’s Response to Nano Food.Kristen Lyons & Naomi Smith - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (1):27-38.
    This paper examines regulatory responses to the presence of previously undetected and unlabelled nanoparticles in the Australian food system. Until 2015, the Australian regulatory body Food Standards Australia New Zealand denied that nanoparticles were present in Australian food. However, and despite repeated claims from Australia’s food regulator, research commissioned by civil society group Friends of the Earth has demonstrated that nanoparticles are deliberately included as ingredients in an array of food available for sale in Australia. This paper critically examines how (...)
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  26.  6
    How to Address the Policy and Ethical Issues Emerging with New Technology. The Case of Synthetic Biology in a Small Country.Franc Mali - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (1):61-73.
    Synthetic biology is rather a new field of science and technology. Societal, regulatory, legal, ethical, safety and security aspects of this field have already been analysed in much detail and discussed very widely in recent years. There is, however, a dearth of empirical studies on the points of view of relevant stakeholders in countries where SB is still in the process of emergence. Slovenia is one of them, and accordingly, the article analyses the situation of SB in this small country, (...)
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  27.  3
    Decision Support for International Agreements Regulating Nanomaterials.Ineke Malsch, Martin Mullins, Elena Semenzin, Alex Zabeo, Danail Hristozov & Antonio Marcomini - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (1):39-54.
    Nanomaterials are handled in global value chains for many different products, albeit not always recognisable as nanoproducts. The global market for nanomaterials faces an uncertain future, as the international dialogue on regulating nanomaterials is still ongoing and risk assessment data are being collected. At the same time, regulators and civil society organisations complain about a lack of transparency about the presence of nanomaterials on the market. In the project on Sustainable Nanotechnologies, a Decision Support System has been developed, primarily for (...)
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  28.  3
    Nanotechnology and Risk Governance in the European Union: The Constitution of Safety in Highly Promoted and Contested Innovation Areas.Hannot Rodríguez - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (1):5-26.
    The European Union is strategically committed to the development of nanotechnology and its industrial exploitation. However, nanotechnology also has the potential to disrupt human health and the environment. The EU claims to be committed to the safe and responsible development of nanotechnology. In this sense, the EU has become the first governing body in the world to develop nanospecific regulations, largely due to legislative action taken by the European Parliament, which has compensated for the European Commission’s reluctance to develop special (...)
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  29.  3
    Person Skilled in the Art in Synthetic Biology From Iraqi and Malaysian Perspectives.Zinatul Ashiqin Zainol & Nabeel Mahdi Althabhawi - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (1):55-60.
    This article presents the problem of a person skilled in the field of synthetic biology. The person skilled in the art is one of the notions which have to be revisited due to the multidisciplinary nature of synthetic biology which involves numerous fields. The article studies this problem from the perspectives of Iraqi and Malaysian patent laws. First, it conceptualizes synthetic biology and person skilled in the art. The Iraqi and Malaysian attitudes regarding person skilled in the art are then (...)
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