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  1.  6
    Colloquium 4 Epicureans on Pity, Slavery, and Autonomy.Kelly E. Arenson - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):119-136.
    Diogenes Laertius reports that the Epicurean sage will pity slaves rather than punish them. This paper considers why a hedonistic egoist would feel pity for her subordinates, given that pity can cause psychological pain. I argue that Epicureans feel bad for those who lack the natural good of security, and that Epicureans’ concern for others is entirely consistent with their hedonistic egoism: they will endure the pain of pity in order to achieve the greater pleasure of social cohesion and to (...)
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  2.  1
    Colloquium 1 Commentary on Horan.Darren Gardner - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):33-40.
    This commentary examines several key points in David Horan’s paper “The Argu­mentative Unity of Plato’s Parmenides.” First, I discuss the general view of the paper, which engages with the first two hypotheses and in particular, the thought experiment passage in hypothesis 2 that is seen as a key to resolving the dilemma of participation. I consider the proposed view that hypothesis 1 takes up from its premise a strictly unitary, or non-multiple “one,” and hypothesis 2 takes up from its premise (...)
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  3.  2
    Colloquium 1 The Argumentative Unity of Plato’s Parmenides.David Horan - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):1-32.
    This paper argues that the resolution of the dilemma of participation presented in the first part of Plato’s Parmenides is a central purpose of the arguments of the first hypothesis and the beginning of the second hypothesis in the second part of the dialogue. I maintain that the training demonstrated by Parmenides in the first and second hypotheses, by shifting the consideration away from sense objects to intelligible objects and away from forms to the one, enables Parmenides to develop an (...)
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  4.  1
    Colloquium 5 Commentary on Szaif.Colin Guthrie King - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):179-186.
    In this response I consider the implications of Jan Szaif’s suggestion that there is a tight “conceptual affinity” between Books I and X of the Nicomachean Ethics. I argue against one view which could claim such a thesis as an ally: the view which maintains that the Nicomachean Ethics is based upon the kind of conceptual cohesion supplied by a supposed metaphysical foundation for claims about happiness.
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  5.  3
    Colloquium 3 Commentary on Schindler.Max J. Latona - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):109-115.
    This essay responds to D.C. Schindler’s “Language as Technē vs. Language as Technology,” which argues that, for Plato, language is a craft that has for its subject matter being itself. While Schindler’s thesis is consistent with what we know as the Platonic philosophical project, it raises several questions. First, does being, as the subject matter of language, constitute a determinate subject matter, such as is required by all crafts? Second, does the ordinary language user meet the epistemic bar of a (...)
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  6.  11
    Colloquium 3 Language as Technē Vs. Language as Technology: Plato’s Critique of Sophistry.D. C. Schindler - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):85-108.
    This essay argues that the difference between philosophy and sophistical rhetoric that Plato presents in the Gorgias turns most fundamentally on different conceptions of the nature of language. After presenting some of the decisive moments in the debate between Socrates and Polus, Gorgias, and Callicles, this essay draws on the discussion of technē in Republic I to elucidate the “precise” sense of technē: namely, technē is ordered to the benefit of that over which it is set. The essay also draws (...)
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  7.  10
    Colloquium 2 Genesis and the Priority of Activity in Aristotle’s Metaphysics IX.8.Mark Sentesy - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):43-70.
    This paper clarifies the way Aristotle uses generation to establish the priority of activity in time and in being. It opens by examining the concept of genetic priority. The argument for priority in beinghood has two parts. The first part is a synthetic argument that accomplishment is the primary kind of source, an argument based on the structure of generation. The second part engages three critical objections to the claim that activity could be an accomplishment: activity appears to lack its (...)
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  8.  3
    Colloquium 2 Commentary on Sentesy.Daniel Shartin - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):71-78.
    As Aristotle’s treatments of substance and change develop from the Categories through the middle books of the Metaphysics, his interest in living things as the best examples of substances becomes more evident. Reading Metaphysics IX.8 against the background of these developments can help us better understand that chapter’s discussion of the priority of actuality to potentiality.
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  9.  1
    Colloquium 4 Commentary on Arenson.Susan A. Stark - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):137-146.
    This commentary raises questions about the moral value of feeling pity. Whereas Professor Arenson asks whether an Epicurean hedonist can rightly feel pity given that feeling pity may be unpleasant, I ask whether feeling pity may be morally problematic for other reasons. In particular, I argue that feeling pity involves an endorsement of a morally problematic hierarchy between pitier and pitied. Because of this, I believe that we should draw a little-made distinction between compassion and pity and that individuals should (...)
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  10.  10
    Colloquium 5 Aristotle on What to Praise and What to Prize: An Interpretation of Nicomachean Ethics I.12.Jan Szaif - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):149-178.
    This essay offers an analysis and interpretation of the rarely commented-on chapter I.12 of the Nicomachean Ethics. Aristotle’s goal in this chapter is to prove that human happiness belongs to the class of prized goods, also characterized as divine goods, whereas virtue ranks lower, being a merely praiseworthy good. It is not easy to see why this chapter is placed at the end of Aristotle’s general discussion of the highest human good in Book I or why he included it at (...)
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