6 found

Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  44
    Lilly M. Russow (forthcoming). Merleau-Ponty and the Myth Of Bodily Intentionality. Noûs 22:35-47.
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  2.  32
    Andrew Bacon (forthcoming). Tense and Relativity. Noûs.
    Those inclined to positions in the philosophy of time that take tense seriously have typically assumed that not all regions of space-time are equal: one special region of space-time corresponds to what is presently happening. When combined with assumptions from modern physics this has the unsettling consequence that the shape of this favored region distinguishes people in certain places or people traveling at certain velocities. In this paper I shall attempt to avoid this result by developing a tensed picture of (...)
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  3.  84
    Martin Lin (forthcoming). Leibniz on the Modal Status of Absolute Space. Noûs.
  4.  43
    Alex Madva & Michael Brownstein (forthcoming). Stereotypes, Prejudice, and the Taxonomy of the Implicit Social Mind. Noûs.
    How do cognition and affect interact to produce action? Research in intergroup psychology illuminates this question by investigating the relationship between stereotypes and prejudices about social groups. Yet it is now clear that many social attitudes are implicit (roughly, nonconscious or involuntary). This raises the question: how does the distinction between cognition and affect apply to implicit mental states? An influential view—roughly analogous to a Humean theory of action—is that “implicit stereotypes” and “implicit prejudices” constitute two separate constructs, reflecting different (...)
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  5.  58
    Lee Walters (forthcoming). Are the Statue and the Clay Mutual Parts? Noûs.
    Are a material object, such as a statue, and its constituting matter, the clay, parts of one another? One wouldn't have thought so, and yet a number of philosophers have argued that they are. I review the arguments for this surprising claim showing how they all fail. I then consider two arguments against the view concluding that there are both pre-theoretical and theoretical considerations for denying that the statue and the clay are mutual parts.
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  6. R. J. Gómez (forthcoming). Review of the Second Edition of Scientific Progress. [REVIEW] Noûs.
     
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