Nursing Philosophy

ISSN: 1466-7681

25 found

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  1.  1
    Another nursing is possible: Ethics, political economies, and possibility in an uncertain world.Jess Dillard-Wright - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (3):e12484.
    Overtaxed by the realities laid bare in the pandemic, nursing has imminent decisions to make. The exigencies of pandemic times overextend a health care infrastructure already groaning under the weight of inequitable distribution of resources and care commodified for profit. We can choose to prioritise different values. Invoking philosopher of science Isbelle Stengers's manifesto for slow science, this is not the only nursing that is possible. With this paper, I pick up threads of nursing's historical ontology, drawing previous scholarship on (...)
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  2.  3
    Echoes of silence.Sharon Laver - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (3):e12481.
    Communication is an integral part of nursing practice—with patients and their relatives, other nurses and members of the healthcare team, and ancillary staff. Through interaction with the ‘other’, language and silence creates and recreates social realities. Acceptance, rejection or modification of social realities depends on what is expressed and by whom. Narratives that are offered can tell of some experiences and not others. Some nurses choose to be silent while others are silenced. In nursing situations recognising and allowing silence to (...)
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  3.  3
    Subjectivity through the lens of Guattari: A key concept for nursing.Jasmine Lavoie, Annie-Claude Laurin & Patrick Martin - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (3).
    Félix Guattari, a French philosopher and psychotherapist often recognized for his collaboration with Gilles Deleuze, also published important work of his own. The way he conceptualizes subjectivity and schizoanalysis (later developed into institutional analysis) can incite us to interpret our social contexts differently and to help frame an emancipatory path in nursing. At La Borde, a psychiatric clinic, subjectivity was seen as the real power that lies within the institutions; invisible and flowing through all levels of the hierarchal structure—like waves—each (...)
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  4.  3
    The ecology of human flourishing embodying the changes we want to see in the world.Brendan McCormack - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (3):e12482.
    Flourishing is the highest good of all persons, but hard to achieve in complex societal systems. This challenge is borne out through the lens of the global nursing shortages with its focus on the supply of nurses to meet health system demands. However, nurses and midwives spend a significant part of their lives at work and so the need to pay attention to the conditions that facilitate flourishing at work is important. Drawing on ancient and contemporary philosophies, as well as (...)
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  5.  10
    Nursing's professional character: A chimera?Martin Lipscomb - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (2):e12477.
    Does nursing possess a character? The idea that professions have characters is hard to sustain, and the possibility that nursing as a collectively or occupation lacks a character is worth considering. To this end it is argued that absent robust theoretical and/or evidential scaffolding it is implausible to suppose that nursing has an objectively real (reality describing) character, and if ‘nursing's character’ is chimeric or illusory, aspects of our conception of professionalism require reappraisal. Specifically, traits and values that attach to (...)
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  6.  10
    Well‐being and dignity in innovative digitally‐led healthcare for aged adults.Moonika Raja & Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (2):e12479.
    Dignity is a central value in care for aged adults, and it must be protected and respected. With demographic changes leading to an aging population, health ministries are increasingly investing in digitalization. However, using unfamiliar digital technology can be challenging and thus impact aged adults' dignity and well‐being. The INNOVATEDIGNITY project aims to research new, dignified ways of engaging with aged adults to shape digital developments in care delivery. This qualitative study aimed to explore how innovative digitally‐led healthcare have influenced (...)
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  7.  8
    A visionary platform for decolonization: The Red Deal.Mohamad H. Al-Chami, Wendy Gifford & Veldon Coburn - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12471.
    In this study, we discuss the colonial project as an eliminatory structure of indigenous ways of knowing and doing that is built into Canadian social and health institutions. We elaborate on the role nursing plays in maintaining systemic racism, marginalization and discrimination of Indigenous Peoples. Based on historical practices and present‐day circumstances, we argue that changing language in research and school curriculums turns decolonization into what Tuck and Yang call a ‘metaphor’. Rather, we propose decolonization as a political project where (...)
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  8.  8
    Examining the role of nurse executives in homecare through the lens of the Sociology of Ignorance and Critical Management Studies.Lisa Ashley & Amélie Perron - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12445.
    This article presents a novel theoretical approach to explore nurse executives’ paradoxical identity and agency of executive and nurse in homecare organizations. This complex phenomenon has yet to be well theorized or analyzed. Through a synthesis of literature, we demonstrate that Critical Management Studies, as informed by Foucault, and the Sociology of Ignorance, can create a different understanding of the complex interplay between knowledge and nonknowledge (ignorance) that positions nurse executives in both influential and precarious ways in homecare organizations. This (...)
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  9.  10
    Mongolian philosophical underpinnings of well‐being: Mythology, shamanism and Mongolian Buddhism (before the development of modern nursing).Buyandelger Batmunkh & Munguntuul Enkhbat - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12469.
    Mongolian philosophical underpinnings of well‐being were expressed in the form of mythology, shamanism and Mongolian Buddhism before the development of modern nursing in Mongolia. Among these forms, the philosophical underpinnings of well‐being, mythology and shamanism were formed as a result of the roots of Mongolian philosophy, whereas Buddhism spread relatively late. As a result of Mongolian mythology, an alternative approach called dom zasal was formed, and it remains one of the important foundations of the idea of well‐being among people. Among (...)
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  10.  6
    African philosophy and nursing: A potential twain that shall meet?Jonathan Bayuo - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12472.
    Undoubtedly, the discipline of nursing has been influenced extensively by both Western and Eastern/Asian philosophies. What remains unknown or, perhaps, poorly articulated is the potential influence of African philosophy on the onto‐epistemology of nursing. As a starting point, this article sought to examine the core claims of African philosophy and how they may offer new meanings to the metaparadigm domains of interest in the discipline of nursing. At the core of African philosophy is the notion of personhood (which is distinguished (...)
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  11.  10
    Beyond loss: An essay about presence and sparkling moments based on observations from life coexisting with a person living with dementia.Janne B. Damsgaard, Jette Lauritzen, Charlotte Delmar & Monica E. Kvande - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12425.
    This is an essay based on a story with observations, about present and sparkling moments from everyday life coexisting with a mother living with dementia. The story is used to begin philosophical underpinnings reflecting on ‘how it could be otherwise’. Dementia deploys brutal existential experiences such as cognitive deterioration, decline in mental functioning and often hurtful social judgements. The person living with dementia goes through transformation and changes of self. Cognitive decline progressively disrupts the foundations upon which social connectedness is (...)
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  12.  11
    Nursing as total institution.Jess Dillard-Wright & Danisha Jenkins - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12460.
    Healthcare under the auspices of late‐stage capitalism is a total institution that mortifies nurses and patients alike, demanding conformity, obedience, perfection. This capture, which resembles Deleuze's enclosure, entangles nurses in carceral systems and gives way to a postenclosure society, an institution without walls. These societies of control constitute another sort of total institution, more covert and insidious for their invisibility (Deleuze, 1992). While Delezue (1992) named physical technologies like electronic identification badges as key to understanding these societies of control, the (...)
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  13.  15
    Is it true that all human beings have dignity?Marcin Paweł Ferdynus - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12464.
    The discussion around dignity in nursing philosophy has been underway for many years. The literature still lacks philosophical arguments that would justify the thesis that all people have dignity. Scholars who defend dignity as an intrinsic value most often refer to Kant. However, Kant does not seem to be the most suitable candidate to defend the thesis that all human beings possess dignity. In this paper, I attempt to show that Aristotle's and Aquinas's views can help justify this thesis. To (...)
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  14.  9
    From informed to empowered consent.Chelsea O. P. Hagopian - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12475.
    Informed consent is ethically incomplete and should be redefined as empowered consent. This essay challenges theoretical assumptions of the value of informed consent in light of substantial evidence of its failure in clinical practice and questions the continued emphasis on autonomy as the primary ethical justification for the practice of consent in health care. Human dignity—rather than autonomy—is advanced from a nursing ethics perspective as a preferred justification for consent practices in health care. The adequacy of an ethic of obligation (...)
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  15.  76
    Older, self‐identifying gay men's conceptualisations of psychological well‐being (PWB): A Canadian perspective.Ingrid Handlovsky, Tessa Wonsiak & Anthony T. Amato - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12466.
    Many older gay men experience diminished psychological well‐being (PWB) due to unique circumstances including discrimination, living with HIV, and aging through the HIV/AIDS crisis. However, there remains ambiguity as to how older gay men define and understand PWB. Our team interviewed and analyzed the accounts of 26 older (50+) self‐identifying English‐speaking men living in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. We drew on tenets of constructivist grounded theory and intersectionality to account for unique contextual considerations and power relations. Semi‐structured Zoom interviews were (...)
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  16.  10
    Promoting moral imagination in nursing education: Imagining and performing.Darlaine Jantzen, Lorelei Newton, Kerry-Ann Dompierre & Sean Sturgill - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12427.
    Moral imagination is a central component of moral agency and person‐centred care. Becoming moral agents who can sustain attention on patients and their families through their illness and suffering involves imagining the other, what moral possibilities are available, what choices to make, and how one wants to be. This relationship between moral agency, moral imagination, and personhood can be effaced by a focus on task‐driven technical rationality within the multifaceted challenges of contemporary healthcare. Similarly, facilitating students' moral agency can also (...)
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  17.  14
    Poststructuralism and the construction of subjectivities in forensic mental health: Opportunities for resistance.Jim A. Johansson & Dave Holmes - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12440.
    Nurses working in correctional and forensic mental health settings face unique challenges in the provision of care to patients within custodial settings. The subjectivities of both patients and nurses are subject to the power relations, discourses and abjection encountered within these practice milieus. Using a poststructuralist approach using the work of Foucault, Kristeva, and Deleuze and Guattari, this paper explores how both patient and nurse subjectivities are produced within the carceral logic of this apparatus of capture. Recognizing that subjectivities are (...)
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  18.  3
    Can philosophy benefit nurses and/or nursing? Heidegger and Strauss, problems of knowledge and context.Martin Lipscomb - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):1-8.
    When researchers and scholars claim their work is based on a philosophical idea or a philosopher’s corpus of ideas (and theory/theorist can be substituted for philosophy/philosopher), and when “basing” signifies something significant rather than subsidiary or inconsequential, what level of understanding and expertise can readers reasonably expect authors to possess? In this paper some of the uses to which philosophical ideas and named philosophers (Martin Heidegger and Leo Strauss) are put in exegesis is critiqued. Considering problematic instances of idea-name use (...)
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  19.  11
    Defining dignity in higher education as an alternative to requiring ‘Trigger Warnings’.Gordon MacLaren - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12474.
    This article examines trigger warnings, particularly the call for trigger warnings on university campuses, and from a Levinasian and Kantian ethical perspective, and addresses the question: When, if ever, are trigger warnings helpful to student's learning? The nursing curriculum is developed with key stakeholders and regulatory bodies to ensure graduate nurses are competent to deliver a high standard of care to patients and clients. Practical teaching practice and published research has uncovered an increasing use of ‘Trigger Warnings’ before a topic (...)
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  20.  14
    Re‐examining the relationship between moral distress and moral agency in nursing.Georgina Morley & Lauren R. Sankary - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12419.
    In recent years, the phenomenon of moral distress has been critically examined—and for a good reason. There have been a number of different definitions suggested, some that claimed to be consistent with the original definition but in fact referred to different epistemological states. In this paper, we re‐examine moral distress by exploring its relationship with moral agency. We critically examine three conceptions of moral agency and argue that two of these conceptions risk placing nurses' values at the center of moral (...)
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  21.  12
    Emily's struggle for dignity: An idiographic case study of a woman with multiple sclerosis.Lucia Podolinská & Juraj Čáp - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12470.
    Dignity is one of the essential values and central concepts in nursing care. Dignity can be threatened due to radical life changes; therefore, this idiographic case study aimed to explore the sense of dignity experienced by a woman with multiple sclerosis. An interpretative phenomenological analysis was adopted, using data collected through a face‐to‐face semistructured interview with Emily, a 45‐year‐old woman. The study was approved by the local ethics committee. Six personal experiential themes were identified: To be ruled by a sick (...)
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  22.  11
    Lefebvre's production of space: Implications for nursing.Jacqueline A. Strus, Dave Holmes, Patrick O'Byrne & Chad Hammond - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12420.
    In this paper, we argue that nurses need to be aware of how the production of space in specific contexts – including health care systems and research institutions – perpetuates marginalized populations' state of social otherness. Lefebvre's idea regarding spatial triad is mobilized in this paper, as it pertains to two‐spirited, lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer populations (2SLGBTQ*). We believe that nurses can create counter‐spaces within health care systems and research institutions that challenge normative discourses. Lefebvre's work provides us (...)
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  23.  9
    The place of philosophy in nursing.Agness C. Tembo - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12473.
    Philosophy adds humanness to nursing and facilitates holistic care. Philosophies like Ubuntu which purports that a person is only a person through other people and emphasises community cohesion and caring for each other can add humanness to nursing. Because Ubuntu validates subjective experience and its meaning in the lifeworld, it exemplifies the basis of holistic and individualised caring in nursing. Although nurses can make their own philosophy through critical reflexivity, the convergent point is the goal of meaningful caring that is, (...)
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  24. The machine of caring: A book review of "Philosophy of Care" By Boris Groys. [REVIEW]Matthew Tieu - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12465.
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  25.  11
    Gender influences on caring, dignity and well‐being in older person care: A systematic literature review and thematic synthesis.Lamprini M. Xiarchi, Kristina Nässén, Lina Palmér, Fiona Cowdell & Elisabeth Lindberg - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12467.
    Globally, healthcare has become dominated by women nurses. Gender is also known to impact the way people are cared for in various healthcare systems. Considering gender from the perspective of how lived bodies are positioned through the structural relations of institutions and processes, this systematic review aims to explore the meaning of gender in the caring relationship between the nurse and the older person through a synthesis of available empirical data published from 1993 to 2022. CINAHL, PUBMED, EMBASE and Web (...)
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