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  1. The Disponent Power in Gilbert's De Magnete: From Attraction to Alignment.Laura Georgescu - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (2):149-176.
    In A Treatise of Artificial Magnets, John Michell observes, Not being aware of this property [i.e. the equality of attraction and repulsion], he [Gilbert] concluded from some experiments he had made, not very irationally [sic], that the Needle was not attracted by the magnet, but turned into its position by, what he calls, a disponent virtue […]. For Michell, the disponent virtue 1 is the underlying cause of magnetic phenomena in Gilbert’s treatment. He is not alone. Ridley and Carpenter also (...)
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  2.  1
    Anthropological Materials in the Making of Michael Polanyi's Metascience.Struan Jacobs & Phil Mullins - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (2):261-285.
    Anthropological discussions were important for Michael Polanyi in the middle phase of his intellectual career, in which he articulated in some detail his understanding of science, culture and society. This middle period commenced with his 1946 Riddell Memorial Lectures at Durham University in early 1946, published as Science, Faith and Society later that year, and extended through the publication of Personal Knowledge: Towards a Post-Critical Philosophy in 1958, based on Polanyi’s 1951 and 1952 Gifford Lectures. The Riddell Lectures gave Polanyi’s (...)
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  3. Representing Experimental Procedures Through Diagrams at CERN's Large Hadron Collider: The Communicatory Value of Diagrammatic Representations in Collaborative Research.Karaca Koray - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (2):177-203.
    In relatively recent years, quite a number of diverse case studies concerning the use of visual displays—such as graphs, diagrams, tables, pictures, drawings, etc.—in both the physical and biological sciences have been offered in the literature of the history and philosophy of science —see, e.g., Miller 1984; Lynch and Woolgar 1990; Baigrie 1996; Pauwels 2006. These case studies have shown that visual representations fulfill important functions in both the theoretical and experimental practices of science, thereby emphasizing the non-verbal dimension of (...)
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  4. There Is "Noise," and Noise.Eleonora Montuschi - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (2):204-225.
    What is noise? A tumultuous crowd is noisy or, more cheerfully, a group of students on holiday, or a flock of migrating birds. A loud conversation or loud laughter can be noisy if we are reading a philosophy article, or we are performing a physics experiment, or we are concentrating on a yoga exercise. In all such cases, noise is something that others do and that we unwillingly suffer, something that we perceive as an invasion of our perceptual space, or (...)
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  5. Epistemic Identities in Interdisciplinary Science.Lisa M. Osbeck & Nancy J. Nersessian - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (2):226-260.
    Confronting any science studies or learning sciences researcher in the 21st century is the reality of interdisciplinary science. New hybrid fields1 collaboratively build new concepts, combine models from two or more disciplines and forge inter-reliant relationships among specialists with different skill sets to solve new problems. This paper emerges from our recognition that inescapable psychological factors, including identity dynamics, must be described and analyzed in order to better understand the social and cognitive practices specific to interdisciplinary science. In analysis of (...)
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  6.  6
    The Disconnect Problem, Scientific Authority, and Climate Policy.Matthew J. Brown & Joyce C. Havstad - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (1):67-94.
    In this paper, we diagnose and explore one instance of a general phenomenon that we hereby dub “the disconnect problem.” Instances of the disconnect problem arise wherever there is ongoing and severe discordance between the scientific assessment of a politically relevant issue, and the politics and legislation of said issue. Because the disconnect problem involves significant conceptual, epistemic, and ethical discord, it is an especially relevant problem for socially responsible philosophers of science. Here, we focus on the disconnect problem as (...)
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  7. Trust Without Shared Belief: Pluralist Realism and Polar Bear Conservation.Jennifer Jill Fellows - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (1):36-66.
    Trust in an epistemic context is often understood in terms of shared beliefs. That is, if I trust you with regards to the knowledge claims you are making, then I accept and believe your knowledge claims as true. This model of trust building appears problematic for those who hold pluralist realism1 to be a conceptual possibility because the strength of pluralist accounts is often thought to be in the divergence of opinion, not the convergence on a shared belief. Thus, if (...)
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  8.  2
    A Social Epistemological Inquiry Into Biases in Journal Peer Review.Jukola Saana - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (1):124-148.
    Journal peer review is an essential part of academic practices.1 But how well does it serve its purpose and which factors have an influence on how close it comes to achieving its aims? Peer review has been widely discussed in empirical literature: it has been studied both qualitatively and quantitatively (e.g., by Cole, who in his 1992 book uses data on how grant applications submitted to National Science Foundation were...
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  9.  2
    Rethinking Sylva Sylvarum: Francis Bacon’s Use of Giambattista Della Porta’s Magia Naturalis.Doina-Cristina Rusu - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (1):1-35.
    The study of vegetables represents one of the main topics in Bacon’s Sylva sylvarum. Not only in quantitative terms, because plants occupy about a third of the entire book, but the centuries on plants are among the most structured, and this reveals Bacon’s particular interest for the topic. The key to understanding Bacon’s interest can be found in both his Sylva sylvarum and the Historia vitae et mortis, where Bacon explains how the results of studying certain processes in plants can (...)
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  10. An Internal Answer to the Experimenters’ Regress Through the Analysis of the Semantics of Experimental Results and Their Representational Content.Romina Zuppone - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (1):95-123.
    Despite the fact that reproduction of experiments by peers has traditionally been regarded as of the utmost importance in enabling the intersubjectivity of scientific practice, reproductions may yield discordant results and deciding which result should be favored may not be an easy task. According to Harry Collins, experimental disagreement is resolved by the action of social, political and economic factors, but not by means of epistemic and scientific, or so-called internal reasons. His motivation for such a claim is the presence (...)
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